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Re: [nslu2-linux] Re: Which drives do you recommend?

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  • Brian Wood
    ... At some point, if your spun-down time is short enough, you are actually damaging the planet more by spinning down as the startup surge might exceed the
    Message 1 of 16 , May 2, 2007
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      Drew Gibson wrote:
      >>
      > I like to let mine run, spin them down to save battery life or the
      > planet only.

      At some point, if your spun-down time is short enough, you are actually
      damaging the planet more by spinning down as the startup surge might
      exceed the savings.
    • Philip Pemberton
      ... Seconded - I ve got a pair of the 400GB drives in a RAID1 config - they re very nice. Well, except for the fact that you need to hit the power switch to
      Message 2 of 16 , May 2, 2007
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        MrE wrote:
        > I'm using a Seagate Pushbutton Backup 350 GB drive, which is *very*
        > quiet and spins down by itself; I didn't need to make any config changes
        > to get it to spin down.

        Seconded - I've got a pair of the 400GB drives in a RAID1 config - they're
        very nice. Well, except for the fact that you need to hit the power switch to
        turn 'em on if the power fails. If I can find a way to get them apart without
        breaking them, I'll install a power-on mod of some kind in them. Warranty,
        what warranty? :P

        --
        Phil. | (\_/) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny
        ygroups@... | (='.'=) into your signature to help him gain
        http://www.philpem.me.uk/ | (")_(") world domination.
      • Chris Watts
        ... Perhaps the Maxtor drives were so unrealiable that Seagate replaced them with their own drives but retained the Maxtor name on the usb case? Just don t
        Message 3 of 16 , May 3, 2007
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          >Brian Wood wrote:
          >
          >
          >I got three of the 500GB Maxtor units very cheap on sale. I have removed
          >the PATA drives from 2 of them for internal use in other machines. They
          >were both Seagate drives, their "best" consumer perpendicular-type >units.

          >Perhaps it is the USB case that "gave up the ghost"? Ive had no problems
          >with the drives, but they are in properly-cooled cases now, not those
          >strange things with the psychedelic lights on the front.

          Perhaps the Maxtor drives were so unrealiable that Seagate replaced them with their own drives but retained the Maxtor name on the usb case? Just don't buy a old one off ebay or make sure you don't get old stock that been sitting on a self for ages then!
        • Brian Wood
          ... That s the problem with buying external USB units, you never really know what s inside. Usually you can t even tell if it is a SATA or a PATA drive, but
          Message 4 of 16 , May 3, 2007
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            Chris Watts wrote:
            >
            >
            >>Brian Wood wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >>I got three of the 500GB Maxtor units very cheap on sale. I have removed
            >>the PATA drives from 2 of them for internal use in other machines. They
            >>were both Seagate drives, their "best" consumer perpendicular-type >units.
            >
            >>Perhaps it is the USB case that "gave up the ghost"? Ive had no problems
            >>with the drives, but they are in properly-cooled cases now, not those
            >>strange things with the psychedelic lights on the front.
            >
            > Perhaps the Maxtor drives were so unrealiable that Seagate replaced them
            > with their own drives but retained the Maxtor name on the usb case? Just
            > don't buy a old one off ebay or make sure you don't get old stock that
            > been sitting on a self for ages then!


            That's the problem with buying external USB units, you never really know
            what's inside. Usually you can't even tell if it is a SATA or a PATA
            drive, but that matters only if you're going to rip it out I guess.

            I've often seen external units selling for less than a same-sized bare
            drive. I think the reason is the makers can throw whatever they sweep up
            off the floor into those cheap USB cases and the buyers will be happy as
            long as the capacity is close to what's on the box. Issues like speed,
            latency etc. are all made academic by the USB interface.

            Also, the market seems to want SATA units these days, and the external
            boxes are a way to get rid of excess PATA drives.

            I tried to buy a 20 or 40 GB the other day, all I really needed was 2GB
            to hold an OS. Of course the smallest I could easily find was 160GB.

            Of course if you want to buy a *real* hard drive (Ultra-320 SCSI at
            15,000 RPM) you still pay through the nose. Quality always costs, but is
            usually worth it in the end.
          • mattvillago
            ... i like seagate because most of their products have a 5 year warranty.
            Message 5 of 16 , May 3, 2007
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              --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "pezmannen_77" <pezmannen_77@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi
              >
              > I'm gonna buy the nslu2 next week. First i decided to by a MyBook
              > 500gb from WD, but reading the Wiki and here has made be reconsider.
              > Looks to me that nobody has managed to spindown these drives?
              >

              i like seagate because most of their products have a 5 year warranty.
            • Phil Endecott
              ... That s true, but only just. Here are some numbers from a Seagate datasheet; I suspect that other drives are similar: Idle: 7.2 W Peak: 33.6 W How long
              Message 6 of 16 , May 3, 2007
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                > At some point, if your spun-down time is short enough, you are actually
                > damaging the planet more by spinning down as the startup surge might
                > exceed the savings.

                That's true, but only just. Here are some numbers from a Seagate
                datasheet; I suspect that other drives are similar:

                Idle: 7.2 W
                Peak: 33.6 W

                How long does it take to spin up? Let's say 3 seconds. 3 x 33.6 is
                near enough 100 J, which is about what it takes during about 14 seconds
                idling. So you save power overall as long as your average period of
                time spun down is greater than about 14 seconds. Surely no-one would
                set a spin-down time short enough to see that sort of average behaviour.

                The Seagate datasheet also quotes "50,000 contact start-stops" in its
                "reliability" section; I don't really know what that means, but maybe
                it means spin down/up cycles. If you want the drive to last 5 years of
                24/7 operation, that's about one start-stop per hour.

                If I were still using disks (which I'm not - no moving parts here
                except the keyboard and the printer) I would probably choose a spin
                down period of the order of 10 to 30 minutes.


                Phil.
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