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Re: [nslu2-linux] Re: How to access the slug -using openssh-from outside the network

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  • Brian Wood
    ... Well they don t offer telnet either, just the web interface. Not really surprising, it s a consumer product and few consumers know anything about the
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 3, 2006
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      On Dec 3, 2006, at 4:28 AM, martienl wrote:

      > Smashing, it works guys! Port forwarding does it the trick.
      >
      > I'm now very happy with the Slug, smashing product, strange only that
      > Linksys does not offer openssh from the start.

      Well they don't offer telnet either, just the web interface.

      Not really surprising, it's a consumer product and few consumers know
      anything about the command line or would want to use it if they did.

      If they had consumers trying to configure samba from a CLI I'd guess
      their support lines would be *very* busy :-)
    • Brian Wood
      ... Also: Be aware that your slug is now open to the world. Although SSH is a lot more secure than telnet it is not perfect, especially if you are using
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 3, 2006
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        On Dec 3, 2006, at 4:28 AM, martienl wrote:

        > Smashing, it works guys! Port forwarding does it the trick.
        >
        > I'm now very happy with the Slug, smashing product, strange only that
        > Linksys does not offer openssh from the start.
        >


        Also: Be aware that your slug is now open to the world. Although SSH
        is a lot more secure than telnet it is not perfect, especially if you
        are using password authentication and not requiring key exchange.

        Even the web interface is a potential security risk. Things such as
        buffer overflow attacks could get the intruder to a prompt.

        From the slug an intruder could conceivably get to any machine on
        your network. I would not, for example, store any plans for World
        Domination anywhere on your network :-))

        Nothing is totally secure once you have connected to the outside world.
      • macnet83
        Hi guys With this information I managed to access the NSLU2 over the Internet. Thanks a lot! I d like to know in which folder my files are stored. I see the
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 15, 2008
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          Hi guys

          With this information I managed to access the NSLU2 over the Internet.
          Thanks a lot!

          I'd like to know in which folder my files are stored. I see the usual
          directory tree of a Linux system but don't know where my files are
          stored.(files transfered to the Slug on Windows)

          I have a pen drive attached to port2.

          When I attach another drive to port1 how will I access those files too?

          Thank you very much.

          Best Regards
          Jorge
        • John
          ... You could check the samba configuration to find out. Or, if you know the name of any one of those files, you could use a handy brute force method. From a
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 15, 2008
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            On Fri, Feb 15, 2008 at 05:25:30PM -0000, macnet83 wrote:
            > I'd like to know in which folder my files are stored. I see the usual
            > directory tree of a Linux system but don't know where my files are
            > stored.(files transfered to the Slug on Windows)

            You could check the samba configuration to find out. Or, if you
            know the name of any one of those files, you could use a handy
            brute force method. From a shell on the slug, type:

            find / -name fullname.ext

            After a few moments (this searches the entire disk), it will tell
            you where every file with that name resides on your disk. If you
            don't know the case of your file name and the 'find' on your slug
            supports it, you can try:

            find / -iname fullname.ext

            The '-iname' option specifies a case-insensitive search. 'Find'
            has a lot of features (read the docs) and should be your first
            resource for lost files.

            On a fully configured system, you can find files faster with the
            'locate' command. Unfortunately, some slug distributions come with
            buggy versions of updatedb/locate.

            Regards,

            John
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