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is it easy to add /dev/hda4?

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  • stopcastingporosity
    Hi, I m new here and actually know little about the nuts and bolts of linux though I briefly played with it maybe eight years ago. I ve been following the
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 12, 2004
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      Hi,

      I'm new here and actually know little about the nuts and bolts of
      linux though I briefly played with it maybe eight years ago.

      I've been following the mt-daapd development and have even gotten it
      running (barely) on my NSLU2.

      One thing I wanted to be able to do was to have a fat32 partition
      mounted under my music directory so that I could have access to my
      music both via mt-daapd and also when the hard drive is plugged
      directly into my (or any) windows computer. Needless to say, I'd be
      able to add music to the hard drive too.

      So, I figured how to add a fat32 partition in a complicated and ugly
      manner, but the NSLU2 doesn't seem to have a /dev/hda4 or /dev/hdb4
      so
      I can't just add a new mount point in fstab.

      Is this a simple thing to add? Rather, is this something I can add
      via
      a telnet session or would I have to compile a new kernel or something?
      Right now I don't even have linux installed (besides a cd bootdisk)
      much less a compiler and toolchain.

      Thanks,
      -mark
    • casper_theghostwriter
      ... ... ugly ... Try mknod /dev/sda4 b 8 4 to create an entry in the device table. This will create a block device driver of
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 12, 2004
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        --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "stopcastingporosity"
        <stopcastingporosity@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > One thing I wanted to be able to do was to have a fat32 partition
        > mounted under my music directory so that I could have access to my
        > music both via mt-daapd and also when the hard drive is plugged
        > directly into my (or any) windows computer. Needless to say, I'd be
        > able to add music to the hard drive too.
        >
        > So, I figured how to add a fat32 partition in a complicated and
        ugly
        > manner, but the NSLU2 doesn't seem to have a /dev/hda4 or /dev/hdb4
        > so
        > I can't just add a new mount point in fstab.
        >

        Try "mknod /dev/sda4 b 8 4" to create an entry in the device table.
        This will create a block device driver of Major ID 8 and minor ID 4.
        The other three partitions, /dev/sda1, sda2, sda3, are minor
        devices 1, 2 & 3 respectively so you'll want the 4th partition to have
        minor number 4.
        Do an "ls -l /dev/sda* to make sure that the major/minor numbers
        match what I wrote for your system.

        Now that you've got an entry in the /dev directory, it's time to see
        if you can use it. I went to /proc and did a "cat /proc/filesystems"
        to see what was supported. Apparently they only support EXT2, EXT3
        and VFAT. VFAT can handle FAT32 filesystems.

        You'll also need a mount point -- i.e. an empty directory to serve
        as the "top" of the drive. You can either use one of the three
        sub-directories in the /mnt directory, or create your own in the
        /share directory. I'd prefer the latter since it's consistent with the
        other disk mounting points. So "mkdir /share/iTunes"

        Finally, you have to mount your partition. Do this via:
        "mount -t vfat /dev/sda4 /share/iTunes"

        Just for kicks, I thought I'd try out a USB flash drive I had sitting
        around. I plugged it in, and it mounted/unmounted it via
        "mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /mnt/tmpmnt" and everything works
        fine.

        Good luck.

        Chris Pikus
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