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RE: [nslu2-linux] Re: Native Compile

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  • Gregg C Levine
    Hello from Gregg C Levine No. That is a bad idea. Do not do that. There are distributions of Linux out there that are targeted towards the population who want
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 29, 2005
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      Hello from Gregg C Levine
      No. That is a bad idea. Do not do that. There are distributions of
      Linux out there that are targeted towards the population who want to
      use Linux, but still need that operating system around.
      ---
      Gregg C Levine hansolofalcon@...
      ---
      "Remember the Force will be with you. Always." Obi-Wan Kenobi

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of David Wheeler
      > Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2005 2:18 AM
      > To: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [nslu2-linux] Re: Native Compile
      >
      > Ah, now I understand. I've a Windows background with a small enough
      > Linux experience to make dangerous assumptions: I assumed that
      because
      > I was located in the same directory as the compiled program that
      > typing the name would be good enough. Using the full pathname or
      > ./a.out works. Adding ./ to the PATH works as well (but is it
      right?)
      >
      > Dave.
      >
      > --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Gregg C Levine"
      > <hansolofalcon@w...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello from Gregg C Levine
      > > It also means that he's trying to run a program, and did not
      specify
      > > the path that the program is roosting in. For example at a prompt,
      if
      > > I were to try to run a program in a directory that I created,
      which is
      > > not part of the normal Linux path of directories, I too would see
      that
      > > error message. Unless the program was prefaced with a
      #./<filename>
      > > where the # is the root prompt, and ./ characters mean that you
      want
      > > to run that program right there. And of course <filename> means
      the
      > > name of the file in question.
      > >
      > > As for my comment regarding a.out stuff, that is an intermediate
      step
      > > in making a program from source code. Typically we humans then
      rename
      > > it to the name we want to run it as. In my case I would typically
      > > type, #gcc -o helloworld.c helloworld and end up with what he
      wanted.
      > >
      > > Again folks please note that my NSLU2 is currently "on order"
      > > according to my jobber, and that my experiences in Intel based
      Linux
      > > is what's being discussed and presented here.
      > > ---
      > > Gregg C Levine hansolofalcon@w...
      > > ---
      > > "Remember the Force will be with you. Always." Obi-Wan Kenobi
      > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com
      > > [mailto:nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com] On
      > > > Behalf Of Inge B. Arnesen
      > > > Sent: Wednesday, December 28, 2005 12:43 PM
      > > > To: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: RE: [nslu2-linux] Native Compile
      > > >
      > > > > That one you see isn't really meant to be run.
      > > >
      > > > Que? Care to elaborate on that?
      > > >
      > > > And BTW: Notice that his error message is "No such file or
      > > > directory" which points to a FS or path error.
      > > >
      > > > best,
      > > >
      > > > -- Inge
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