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Re: Detecting Optware

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  • Narendra
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 4, 2012
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      --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Takata <htwiz2002@...> wrote:
      >
      > Oh! If all you're doing is testing for writeability, just see if you can
      > "touch" said file. If it exists afterward, use it, otherwise use /opt :)
      > On Oct 28, 2012 8:29 AM, "Ron Guerin" <ron@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > On 10/27/2012 12:37 AM, Anthony Takata wrote:
      > > > Going out on a limb, but looking for the /opt directory is typically a
      > > good
      > > > way, or doing a "which ipkg" and see if it exists.
      > >
      > > /opt is on everything[*]. That would only be useful as a test to see if
      > > you were running on a Unix, Linux or BSD system of some sort. That
      > > could be anything from a mainframe to a clip-on music player though.
      > >
      > > The test for /opt/bin/ipkg-opt seems like it's a better choice, but the
      > > more I've been thinking about it, it really isn't a very good test for
      > > Optware either, as while ipkg is used by Optware, it's not actually part
      > > of Optware. In fact, ipkg has been abandoned by its authors, so it's
      > > highly probable that Optware will switch to something else (likely opkg)
      > > in the foreseeable future, provided Optware doesn't become abandoned
      > > itself.
      > >
      > > It may however that looking for /opt/bin/ipkg-opt is as good an
      > > indicator as I'm going to get. In the end I'm really trying to figure
      > > out if I'm on an embedded device where /etc is part of a read-only file
      > > system and that because of this, I should prefer /opt/etc over /etc for
      > > locating my config file. I haven't found any remotely sane way of doing
      > > that, and since my scripts require things that a non-developer user on
      > > an Optware-capable device would only have gotten from Optware, I thought
      > > I'd try to find a reliable way of detecting Optware instead. It seems
      > > there's no way to do that either though.
      > >
      > > - Ron
      > >
      > > [*] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_directory_structure
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesystem_Hierarchy_Standard
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Narendra
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 4, 2012
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        --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Ron Guerin <ron@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 10/27/2012 06:17 AM, oddballhero wrote:
        > > On 10/26/2012 09:10 AM, Ron Guerin wrote:
        > >> I'm writing some scripts I plan to release and it would be helpful to
        > >> know when I'm running on a device with Optware as opposed to a
        > >> conventional server or desktop. Is there any reliable way to detect
        > >> when you're running on an Optware-enabled device?
        >
        > > Well, they're usually smaller......
        >
        > What is? The physical size of the unit? ;)
        >
        > > They have a bunch of stuff under /opt .......
        >
        > So do lots of systems that aren't running Optware.
        >
        > > You can type ipkg and it will like it .............
        >
        > I was thinking of testing for the existence of /opt/bin/ipkg-opt,
        > because it seems unlikely that you'd find something called ipkg-opt in
        > /opt/bin anywhere except on an Optware system. I was hoping there'd be
        > something else though, partly because it seems that ipkg is apparently
        > abandoned software. It wouldn't surprise me if at some point in the not
        > distant future, ipkg got replaced with opkg or something else.
        >
        > - Ron
        >
      • Narendra
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 4, 2012
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          --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Ron Guerin <ron@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 10/27/2012 12:37 AM, Anthony Takata wrote:
          > > Going out on a limb, but looking for the /opt directory is typically a good
          > > way, or doing a "which ipkg" and see if it exists.
          >
          > /opt is on everything[*]. That would only be useful as a test to see if
          > you were running on a Unix, Linux or BSD system of some sort. That
          > could be anything from a mainframe to a clip-on music player though.
          >
          > The test for /opt/bin/ipkg-opt seems like it's a better choice, but the
          > more I've been thinking about it, it really isn't a very good test for
          > Optware either, as while ipkg is used by Optware, it's not actually part
          > of Optware. In fact, ipkg has been abandoned by its authors, so it's
          > highly probable that Optware will switch to something else (likely opkg)
          > in the foreseeable future, provided Optware doesn't become abandoned itself.
          >
          > It may however that looking for /opt/bin/ipkg-opt is as good an
          > indicator as I'm going to get. In the end I'm really trying to figure
          > out if I'm on an embedded device where /etc is part of a read-only file
          > system and that because of this, I should prefer /opt/etc over /etc for
          > locating my config file. I haven't found any remotely sane way of doing
          > that, and since my scripts require things that a non-developer user on
          > an Optware-capable device would only have gotten from Optware, I thought
          > I'd try to find a reliable way of detecting Optware instead. It seems
          > there's no way to do that either though.
          >
          > - Ron
          >
          > [*] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_directory_structure
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesystem_Hierarchy_Standard
          >
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