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Re: [nslu2-general] How can I gain full access to NSLU2 formatted drive when connnecting it directly to a LinuxPC

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  • Fajar A. Nugraha
    ... That seems to be your main problem. I assume you re using GUI. Either: - login as root (if you ve set the password), or - open terminal (menu -
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
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      On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 9:05 PM, sledgebeast <sledgebeast@...> wrote:
      > I am a novice when it comes to issuing commands in Linux

      That seems to be your main problem. I assume you're using GUI. Either:
      - login as root (if you've set the password), or
      - open terminal (menu -> accessories -> terminal), type "gksu nautilus"

      --
      Fajar
    • Sledge Hammer
      OK In terminal I typed gksu nautilus.... Now what. I still cant write to the External Hard Drive. Is what your telling me to do only the first step or what?
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
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        OK

        In terminal I typed gksu nautilus.... Now what. I still cant write to the External Hard Drive. Is what your telling me to do only the first step or what?
        Theres got to be more to it.
        I would assume the drive has access rights created by the NSLU2 that are preventing me from mounting the drive read/write.

        I am logged into UBUNTU with my administrator account. I have full access. Just not on the NSLU2 formatted hard drive.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Fajar A. Nugraha" <fajar@...>
        To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:04:44 PM
        Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] How can I gain full access to NSLU2 formatted drive when connnecting it directly to a LinuxPC






        On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 9:05 PM, sledgebeast < sledgebeast@... > wrote:
        > I am a novice when it comes to issuing commands in Linux

        That seems to be your main problem. I assume you're using GUI. Either:
        - login as root (if you've set the password), or
        - open terminal (menu -> accessories -> terminal), type "gksu nautilus"

        --
        Fajar



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sledge Hammer
        Skip my last reply. I am in as root and now can write to the NSLU2 drive. Next stupid question.... Is there a way to make my origional account able to write to
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
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          Skip my last reply. I am in as root and now can write to the NSLU2 drive.

          Next stupid question.... Is there a way to make my origional account able to write to this drive without having to login as root?


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Fajar A. Nugraha" <fajar@...>
          To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:04:44 PM
          Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] How can I gain full access to NSLU2 formatted drive when connnecting it directly to a LinuxPC






          On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 9:05 PM, sledgebeast < sledgebeast@... > wrote:
          > I am a novice when it comes to issuing commands in Linux

          That seems to be your main problem. I assume you're using GUI. Either:
          - login as root (if you've set the password), or
          - open terminal (menu -> accessories -> terminal), type "gksu nautilus"

          --
          Fajar



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Fajar A. Nugraha
          On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 11:41 AM, Sledge Hammer ... Did a new nautilus (a.k.a file manager ) window show up? ... You should. Since the nautilus you opened has
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
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            On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 11:41 AM, Sledge Hammer
            <sledgebeast@...> wrote:
            > OK
            >
            > In terminal I typed gksu nautilus.... Now what.

            Did a new nautilus (a.k.a "file manager") window show up?

            > I still cant write to the External Hard Drive. Is what your telling me to do only the first step or what?

            You should. Since the nautilus you opened has root privileges. But
            only in that particular window.

            > Theres got to be more to it.
            > I would assume the drive has access rights created by the NSLU2 that are preventing me from mounting the drive read/write.

            That's what "gksu" is for.

            There are cases when a drive is force-mounted read-only, like when it
            has unrecoverable errors. I can't think of any "newbie-friendly" way
            to test or fix it though. My best advice at this point:
            - make sure you try the operation (copy, etc.) from the gksu-ed
            window, not from your normal nautilus window
            - type "mount" from your terminal window, make sure the drive is not
            mounted read-only for some reason. And make sure it's ext3 (instead of
            some read-only fileystem like squashfs or whatever)
            - get your local linux expert (or at least, someone who knows about
            filesystems and permissions) to help

            --
            Fajar
          • Fajar A. Nugraha
            On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Sledge Hammer ... Yes, but it s not recommended. See: - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_permission -
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
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              On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Sledge Hammer
              <sledgebeast@...> wrote:
              > Skip my last reply. I am in as root and now can write to the NSLU2 drive.
              >
              > Next stupid question.... Is there a way to make my origional account able to write to this drive without having to login as root?

              Yes, but it's not recommended.

              See:
              - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_permission
              - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chown
              - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chmod

              a relatively "safe" way (maybe. I never tested it on nslu) is to run
              chown or chmod only on the directory you're interested in. Something
              like:
              - chown -R your_username /media/nslu-drive/path/to/where/your/folders/will/be
              - chmod -R 777 /media/nslu-drive/path/to/where/your/folders/will/be

              The key here is to ONLY change owner or permission of a particular
              folder, NOT the whole nslu drive.

              --
              Fajar
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