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Re: [nslu2-general] Re: Size limit listing files in a directory with ls from cron but not command line

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  • Carl Lowenstein
    ... I m sure that the answer is that /bin/ls is just a link to busybox, and /opt/bin/ls is the real thing. Busybox is somewhat crippled to keep its size
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 16, 2011
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      On Sun, Jan 16, 2011 at 2:02 AM, redgshost <redgshost@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you very much. This works perfectly.
      >
      > If you know I'd be interested to know why the /bin/ls utility is crippled in this way but either way you have an answered an question that has troubled me for a long time and done so very quickly. Thanmk you very much.
      >
      > Red
      >
      > --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "rolandkbs" <roland.krebs@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I suppose you have installed the coreutils. When you are logged in, your path shows to /opt/bin/ls first, but cron uses /bin/ls, which has the 2GB limit.
      > > Simply change your script to use '/opt/bin/ls -l' instead of just 'ls -l'.
      > >

      I'm sure that the answer is that /bin/ls is just a link to busybox,
      and /opt/bin/ls is the real thing. Busybox is somewhat crippled to
      keep its size down.

      carl
      --
      carl lowenstein  <clowenstein@...>
    • Mike Westerhof
      ... One of the coolest tools in the embedded and small-system Linux space is busybox -- it combines in a single executable a lot of the basic Linux utilities.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 16, 2011
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        redgshost wrote:
        > Thank you very much. This works perfectly.
        >
        > If you know I'd be interested to know why the /bin/ls utility is crippled in this way

        One of the coolest tools in the embedded and small-system Linux space is
        busybox -- it combines in a single executable a lot of the basic Linux
        utilities. Busybox has had full support for files > 2GB in size for a
        long time, but not back at the time Linksys was creating the NSLU2. In
        order to maintain full compatibility with the Linksys firmware (and fit
        in the same small flash space), Unslung keeps some of those same basic
        Busybox limitations. Optware doesn't have to live in the onboard flash
        of the NSLU2, and is how you get around the limitations of the built-in
        utilities.

        As the adage goes, the wonder is not in how *well* the bear dances, but
        rather that it dances at all.

        -Mike (mwester)
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