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Re: Problem after trying dd to clone new drive - wont boot on old disk

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  • montyny1
    Thanks. I ended up installing one of the drives in to an older PC, connecting the other with USB ( I should really invest in eSATA) and used the Parted Magic
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 9, 2009
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      Thanks. I ended up installing one of the drives in to an older PC, connecting the other with USB ( I should really invest in eSATA) and used the Parted Magic live CD to first use clonezilla, then gparted to resize the new disk.

      After that, I reconnected the drive and the slug was quite happy. At this time everything seems to be working perfectly!

      --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Westerhof (mwester)" <mwester@...> wrote:
      >
      > docbillnet wrote:
      > >> Don't use dd to copy filesystems - it only works in very specific
      > >> situations. You are far better off to format the target partition,
      > >>
      > >
      > > That statement is completely absurd.
      >
      > Thanks for your polite response. Note that after that very strong
      > statement you make, you then go on to (correctly) identify the very
      > specific situations where dd *does* actually work.
      >
      > Thanks for your commentary.
      >
      > -Mike (mwester)
      >
      > > "dd" always works when copying filesystems, provided you use the correct block sizes. System administrators have been doing this to backup filesystems for more than 30 years. I have personally been doing it for more than 15 years, and I have never had problems.
      > >
      > > That said, chances are the problem is not copying the filesystem, but the disk image. e.g.
      > >
      > > dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/dev/sdb1 bs=2048
      > >
      > > works ok. But
      > >
      > > dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb bs=2048
      > >
      > > will only work if both hard drives have the same physical partitioning.
      > >
      > > However, you can still recover the data by dd'ing back to the original drive if you erased it...
      > >
      > > That said, I do NOT advice using dd to copy filesystems unless they contain features not supported by higher level programs. Usually "rsync" is both faster and better. However, a common exception to this rule is when copying the root partition of a file system with SELinux enabled. "dd" will preserve all the SELinux settings, "rsync" even with the appropriate settings might not be able to.
      > >
      > > I also tend to use "dd" when backing up windows partitions. The reason being is I've yet to find a linux method of copying windows file systems that preserves windows ACL's and such. Meaning if I want C: drive to boot and start, I better copy it with dd.
      > >
      > > Bill
      > >
      >
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