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Re: [nslu2-general] What next?

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  • Thomas Reitmayr
    Hi Peter, if you want a device with more power (CPU, memory, network) and support by Debian, then I can recommend a NAS device by QNAP. I bought a TS-109 (at a
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 10, 2009
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      Hi Peter,
      if you want a device with more power (CPU, memory, network) and support
      by Debian, then I can recommend a NAS device by QNAP. I bought a TS-109
      (at a local store in Europe) a while ago and run Angstrom on it, but
      Debian is well-supported for this type of devices, see
      http://www.cyrius.com/debian/ .

      The TS-109/119 can be used with one internal + one external drive, the
      TS-209/219 is the version with two internal drives. Putting the HDs to
      sleep works fine for me. The power consumption is also ok, I guess - did
      not measure mine, but data sheet of TS-109 says 6.6 W in sleep mode.
      The devices are a bit more expensive than a Slug though.

      The above link also lists similar devices by other manufacturers but I
      do not have any personal experience with them.
      Regards,
      -Thomas

      Am Sonntag, den 09.08.2009, 11:52 +0200 schrieb Peter Lohmann:
      >
      > Hi!
      >
      > I am currently using a SLUG with one harddrive as a debian box hosting
      > an SVN
      > repository for my private document management system. It works quite
      > OK, but I
      > would like some more power when it comes to data throughput and fancy
      > some other
      > features.
      >
      > Do you guys know of any hardware that
      > - can house two drives (external or internal)
      > - can spin down the drives (my external drive cannot spin down
      > currently)
      > [--> the WD mybook series can do that on their own, right?]
      > - does have a little bit more power than the nslu2 (for example to run
      > a VPN
      > server)
      > - does have moderate to low power consumption
      > - debian can be installed upon
      > - is available in Europe?
      >
      > Thanks and best regards,
      >
      > Peter
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • lxs4eu
      Perhaps take a look at the Viglen MPC-L? http://www.viglen.co.uk/viglen/Products_Services/Product_Range/Product_file.aspx?eCode=XUBUMPCL basic vitals: 400MHz
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 11, 2009
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        Perhaps take a look at the Viglen MPC-L?

        http://www.viglen.co.uk/viglen/Products_Services/Product_Range/Product_file.aspx?eCode=XUBUMPCL

        basic vitals:
        400MHz AMD Geode processor, 512MB RAM, 80GB hard disk,
        6 USB ports, and low-power consumption at 10W

        - - - -

        For folks in UK: can be sourced for only £79 incl. VAT
        ...also includes keyboard, mouse, 1 year on-site support + delivery!
        This special offer price is available to listeners of @uupc (http://podcast.ubuntu-uk.org/)

        - a quick web search should offer you more info -
        http://lmgtfy.com/?q=viglen+mpc-l
      • CORNELIU DOBAN
        Hi Peter, The SheevaPlug is more powerful (1GHz ARM9) and in the same price range ($99) as the NSLU2, but it has only one USB. Comes with Ubuntu 9.04
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 11, 2009
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          Hi Peter,

          The SheevaPlug is more powerful (1GHz ARM9) and in the same price range ($99) as the NSLU2, but it has only one USB.

          Comes with Ubuntu 9.04 pre-installed in the 512MB NAND flash and has 512MB DDR2 to play.

          Take a look:
          http://www.marvell.com/products/embedded_processors/developer/kirkwood/sheevaplug.jsp

          I got mine a few months ago and I'm happy with it.

          Regards,
          Corneliu

          --- On Mon, 8/10/09, Thomas Reitmayr <treitmayr@...> wrote:

          From: Thomas Reitmayr <treitmayr@...>
          Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] What next?
          To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: "Peter Lohmann" <email@...>
          Date: Monday, August 10, 2009, 6:08 PM






           





          Hi Peter,

          if you want a device with more power (CPU, memory, network) and support

          by Debian, then I can recommend a NAS device by QNAP. I bought a TS-109

          (at a local store in Europe) a while ago and run Angstrom on it, but

          Debian is well-supported for this type of devices, see

          http://www.cyrius com/debian/ .



          The TS-109/119 can be used with one internal + one external drive, the

          TS-209/219 is the version with two internal drives. Putting the HDs to

          sleep works fine for me. The power consumption is also ok, I guess - did

          not measure mine, but data sheet of TS-109 says 6.6 W in sleep mode.

          The devices are a bit more expensive than a Slug though.



          The above link also lists similar devices by other manufacturers but I

          do not have any personal experience with them.

          Regards,

          -Thomas



          Am Sonntag, den 09.08.2009, 11:52 +0200 schrieb Peter Lohmann:

          >

          > Hi!

          >

          > I am currently using a SLUG with one harddrive as a debian box hosting

          > an SVN

          > repository for my private document management system. It works quite

          > OK, but I

          > would like some more power when it comes to data throughput and fancy

          > some other

          > features.

          >

          > Do you guys know of any hardware that

          > - can house two drives (external or internal)

          > - can spin down the drives (my external drive cannot spin down

          > currently)

          > [--> the WD mybook series can do that on their own, right?]

          > - does have a little bit more power than the nslu2 (for example to run

          > a VPN

          > server)

          > - does have moderate to low power consumption

          > - debian can be installed upon

          > - is available in Europe?

          >

          > Thanks and best regards,

          >

          > Peter

          >

          >

          >

          >































          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Urban Cubbage
          Greetings, Well I had taken a good look at where I wanted to go when my slug died in March. Looked at lots of NAS and home server boxes. Decided that I
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 11, 2009
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            Greetings,

            Well I had taken a good look at where I wanted to go when my slug died in
            March. Looked at lots of NAS and home server boxes. Decided that I wanted
            to get a home server setup since I had 3 desktops, 2 portables, Xbox360 and
            two Tivo boxes. What I wanted to do was get a central backup, media server,
            media storage/conversion etc. I finally sat down and wrote up a list of
            requirements for this new box, went through several editions before final
            version was printed. I now have a Windows Home Server with 8 TB of hard
            drive storage. Got a box from Tranquil PC out of UK, a SQA-5A. Love the
            system, storage and being able to finally have backups of everything.

            Urban

            -----Original Message-----
            From: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of Peter Lohmann
            Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 2:53 AM
            To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [nslu2-general] What next?

            Hi!

            I am currently using a SLUG with one harddrive as a debian box hosting an
            SVN
            repository for my private document management system. It works quite OK, but
            I
            would like some more power when it comes to data throughput and fancy some
            other
            features.

            Do you guys know of any hardware that
            - can house two drives (external or internal)
            - can spin down the drives (my external drive cannot spin down currently)
            [--> the WD mybook series can do that on their own, right?]
            - does have a little bit more power than the nslu2 (for example to run a
            VPN
            server)
            - does have moderate to low power consumption
            - debian can be installed upon
            - is available in Europe?

            Thanks and best regards,

            Peter


            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Gregg C Levine
            Hello! I agree with you Corneliu regarding the Sheeva plug. I might also add that my Linux distribution Slackware has been successfully ported to the thing. My
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 11, 2009
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              Hello!
              I agree with you Corneliu regarding the Sheeva plug. I might also add that
              my Linux distribution Slackware has been successfully ported to the thing.

              My only problem is that the thing is wearing only one USB port for the
              drive. This is because I am also a follower of and user of the One-Wire
              hardware from Maxim/Dallas Semiconductor and Linux runs rather well with
              these things via OWFS and I'm involved with that as well.

              My plug is currently not really on order but will be ordered from them RSN
              so enough on that.
              --
              Gregg C Levine hansolofalcon@...
              "The Force will be with you always." Obi-Wan Kenobi
               


              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com]
              On
              > Behalf Of CORNELIU DOBAN
              > Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2009 6:36 PM
              > To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] What next?
              >
              > Hi Peter,
              >
              > The SheevaPlug is more powerful (1GHz ARM9) and in the same price range
              ($99) as the
              > NSLU2, but it has only one USB.
              >
              > Comes with Ubuntu 9.04 pre-installed in the 512MB NAND flash and has 512MB
              DDR2 to
              > play.
              >
              > Take a look:
              >
              http://www.marvell.com/products/embedded_processors/developer/kirkwood/sheev
              aplug.js
              > p
              >
              > I got mine a few months ago and I'm happy with it.
              >
              > Regards,
              > Corneliu
              >
              > --- On Mon, 8/10/09, Thomas Reitmayr <treitmayr@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Thomas Reitmayr <treitmayr@...>
              > Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] What next?
              > To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
              > Cc: "Peter Lohmann" <email@...>
              > Date: Monday, August 10, 2009, 6:08 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi Peter,
              >
              > if you want a device with more power (CPU, memory, network) and support
              >
              > by Debian, then I can recommend a NAS device by QNAP. I bought a TS-109
              >
              > (at a local store in Europe) a while ago and run Angstrom on it, but
              >
              > Debian is well-supported for this type of devices, see
              >
              > http://www.cyrius com/debian/ .
              >
              >
              >
              > The TS-109/119 can be used with one internal + one external drive, the
              >
              > TS-209/219 is the version with two internal drives. Putting the HDs to
              >
              > sleep works fine for me. The power consumption is also ok, I guess - did
              >
              > not measure mine, but data sheet of TS-109 says 6.6 W in sleep mode.
              >
              > The devices are a bit more expensive than a Slug though.
              >
              >
              >
              > The above link also lists similar devices by other manufacturers but I
              >
              > do not have any personal experience with them.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > -Thomas
              >
              >
              >
              > Am Sonntag, den 09.08.2009, 11:52 +0200 schrieb Peter Lohmann:
              >
              > >
              >
              > > Hi!
              >
              > >
              >
              > > I am currently using a SLUG with one harddrive as a debian box hosting
              >
              > > an SVN
              >
              > > repository for my private document management system. It works quite
              >
              > > OK, but I
              >
              > > would like some more power when it comes to data throughput and fancy
              >
              > > some other
              >
              > > features.
              >
              > >
              >
              > > Do you guys know of any hardware that
              >
              > > - can house two drives (external or internal)
              >
              > > - can spin down the drives (my external drive cannot spin down
              >
              > > currently)
              >
              > > [--> the WD mybook series can do that on their own, right?]
              >
              > > - does have a little bit more power than the nslu2 (for example to run
              >
              > > a VPN
              >
              > > server)
              >
              > > - does have moderate to low power consumption
              >
              > > - debian can be installed upon
              >
              > > - is available in Europe?
              >
              > >
              >
              > > Thanks and best regards,
              >
              > >
              >
              > > Peter
            • doll_oliver
              All, ... I m also considering to replace my SLUG with a SheevaPlug. Though following the link to the marvel site I get a bit confused thus please allow a few
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 12, 2009
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                All,

                --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, CORNELIU DOBAN wrote:
                > The SheevaPlug is more powerful (1GHz ARM9) and in the same price range ($99) as the NSLU2 [...]

                I'm also considering to replace my SLUG with a SheevaPlug. Though following the link to the marvel site I get a bit confused thus please allow a few questions:

                o which version would be the right choice: PogoPlug or ShivaPlug Dev Kit?

                o there's also an EU version. I guess this just has an EU jack (instead of the US one), but the EU connector can be removed in the same way as the US jack to give access for a power cord?

                o are there any recommendations for a source ordering in Europe (to avoid custom trouble)?
                --
                thx & cheers
                Oliver
              • Hanneke & Paul Brandt
                Hi there, I d suggest the fit-PC2, a tiny but very complete system: CPU: Intel Atom Z510 or 530 (1.1 / 1.6GHz), Memory: 1GB DDR2 Display: DVI up to 1920x1080
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 25, 2009
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                  Hi there,

                  I'd suggest the fit-PC2, a tiny but very complete system:
                  CPU: Intel Atom Z510 or 530 (1.1 / 1.6GHz),
                  Memory: 1GB DDR2
                  Display: DVI up to 1920x1080
                  Audio: High definition 2.0
                  LAN: 1000 BaseT Ethernet
                  USB: 6 USB
                  IR Receiver
                  miniSD socket
                  12V power supply
                  And all that with only 8W power usage on full CPU load, less than 1W on
                  standby. WLAN and internal harddisk 160G are optional. In my opinion a great
                  platform for home appliances. It's available through amazon, hence
                  worldwide. There are resellers in the netherlands. see for full specs:
                  http://www.fit-pc2.com The fit-pC2 is the top of a range of three. Its
                  smallest cousin, the fit-pc1, is on sale now. In between the two is the
                  fit-pc slim. Smaller and less performing, still more horsepower than the
                  nslu (that is otherwise perfectly able to cope with the more basic home
                  appliances).

                  If anyone has some second thoughts about the fit-PC2, please let us know!
                  regards
                  Paul



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • DaylanDarby
                  Used Nslu2, ~$50 +/- New fit-pC2, $315, $369, $409
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                    Used Nslu2, ~$50 +/-
                    New fit-pC2, $315, $369, $409



                    Hanneke & Paul Brandt wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi there,
                    >
                    > I'd suggest the fit-PC2, a tiny but very complete system:
                    > CPU: Intel Atom Z510 or 530 (1.1 / 1.6GHz),
                    > Memory: 1GB DDR2
                    > Display: DVI up to 1920x1080
                    > Audio: High definition 2.0
                    > LAN: 1000 BaseT Ethernet
                    > USB: 6 USB
                    > IR Receiver
                    > miniSD socket
                    > 12V power supply
                    > And all that with only 8W power usage on full CPU load, less than 1W on
                    > standby. WLAN and internal harddisk 160G are optional. In my opinion a
                    > great
                    > platform for home appliances. It's available through amazon, hence
                    > worldwide. There are resellers in the netherlands. see for full specs:
                    > http://www.fit-pc2.com <http://www.fit-pc2.com> The fit-pC2 is the top
                    > of a range of three. Its
                    > smallest cousin, the fit-pc1, is on sale now. In between the two is the
                    > fit-pc slim. Smaller and less performing, still more horsepower than the
                    > nslu (that is otherwise perfectly able to cope with the more basic home
                    > appliances).
                    >
                    > If anyone has some second thoughts about the fit-PC2, please let us know!
                    > regards
                    > Paul
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                  • docbillnet
                    ... Seems to me a poor choice. The price is rather high for use as a server, and the CPU speed is to slow to be a good media player. Granted there are some
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                      --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "Hanneke & Paul Brandt" <brandt.dominicus@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi there,
                      >
                      > I'd suggest the fit-PC2, a tiny but very complete system:
                      > CPU: Intel Atom Z510 or 530 (1.1 / 1.6GHz),
                      > Memory: 1GB DDR2
                      > Display: DVI up to 1920x1080
                      > Audio: High definition 2.0
                      > LAN: 1000 BaseT Ethernet
                      > USB: 6 USB
                      > IR Receiver
                      > miniSD socket
                      > 12V power supply
                      > And all that with only 8W power usage on full CPU load, less than 1W on
                      > standby. WLAN and internal harddisk 160G are optional. In my opinion a great
                      > platform for home appliances. It's available through amazon, hence
                      > worldwide. There are resellers in the netherlands. see for full specs:
                      > http://www.fit-pc2.com The fit-pC2 is the top of a range of three. Its
                      > smallest cousin, the fit-pc1, is on sale now. In between the two is the
                      > fit-pc slim. Smaller and less performing, still more horsepower than the
                      > nslu (that is otherwise perfectly able to cope with the more basic home
                      > appliances).
                      >
                      > If anyone has some second thoughts about the fit-PC2, please let us know!
                      > regards
                      > Paul
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      Seems to me a poor choice. The price is rather high for use as a server, and the CPU speed is to slow to be a good media player. Granted there are some good media players with slower CPU's, but they have the hardware acceleration chips to make-up for it. Even then, you can't run a standard Linux distribution and expect them to keep up playing your mkv files, rather you need optimized firmware that uses the acceleration chips and all the tricks the developers can throw at them.

                      Bill
                    • docbillnet
                      ... That is not to say there aren t some good uses for a fit-PC2. For example, we recently were considering using a fit-PC2 connected to an LCD TV as a score
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                        --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "docbillnet" <yahoo@...> wrote:
                        > Seems to me a poor choice. The price is rather high for use as a server, and the CPU speed is to slow to be a good media player. Granted there are some good media players with slower CPU's, but they have the hardware acceleration chips to make-up for it. Even then, you can't run a standard Linux distribution and expect them to keep up playing your mkv files, rather you need optimized firmware that uses the acceleration chips and all the tricks the developers can throw at them.
                        >
                        > Bill
                        >

                        That is not to say there aren't some good uses for a fit-PC2. For example, we recently were considering using a fit-PC2 connected to an LCD TV as a score board.

                        Bill
                      • docbillnet
                        Sorry I read the fit-PC hardware specifications, and looked at the price list for the fit-PC2. As far as a media player goes, this might be a good choice if
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                          Sorry I read the fit-PC hardware specifications, and looked at the price list for the fit-PC2. As far as a media player goes, this might be a good choice if you wish to build your own system. I personally prefer a ready to use solution like a popcorn hour, but building your own does give you more flexibility.

                          Bill

                          --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "docbillnet" <yahoo@...> wrote:
                          > Seems to me a poor choice. The price is rather high for use as a server, and the CPU speed is to slow to be a good media player. Granted there are some good media players with slower CPU's, but they have the hardware acceleration chips to make-up for it. Even then, you can't run a standard Linux distribution and expect them to keep up playing your mkv files, rather you need optimized firmware that uses the acceleration chips and all the tricks the developers can throw at them.
                          >
                          > Bill
                          >
                        • Peter Chant
                          ... I wonder if there are any other light weight low power alternatives, I ve played with midge running on an edimax router board, but I wondered if there is
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 9, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            On Wednesday 12 August 2009, Gregg C Levine wrote:
                            > Hello!
                            > I agree with you Corneliu regarding the Sheeva plug. I might also add that
                            > my Linux distribution Slackware has been successfully ported to the thing.
                            >

                            I wonder if there are any other light weight low power alternatives, I've
                            played with midge running on an edimax router board, but I wondered if there
                            is something even lighter weight for those of us who really ought to be using
                            micro controllers but would like the luxury of ethernet and usb and
                            programming in python or tcl rather than C or machine code. For mains
                            connected applications Sheeva plug must be it, but not so useful for batter
                            power perhaps?

                            Pete


                            --
                            Peter Chant
                            http://www.petezilla.co.uk
                          • CORNELIU DOBAN
                            Gumstix Overo is the smallest you can get, but I don t see a network module for it at this time. You can get it with WiFi and BT: http://www.gumstix.com/ ...
                            Message 13 of 15 , Sep 9, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Gumstix Overo is the smallest you can get, but I don't see a network module for it at this time. You can get it with WiFi and BT:

                              http://www.gumstix.com/

                              --- On Wed, 9/9/09, Peter Chant <pete@...> wrote:

                              From: Peter Chant <pete@...>
                              Subject: Re: [nslu2-general] What next?
                              To: nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 3:18 PM






                               





                              On Wednesday 12 August 2009, Gregg C Levine wrote:

                              > Hello!

                              > I agree with you Corneliu regarding the Sheeva plug. I might also add that

                              > my Linux distribution Slackware has been successfully ported to the thing.

                              >



                              I wonder if there are any other light weight low power alternatives, I've

                              played with midge running on an edimax router board, but I wondered if there

                              is something even lighter weight for those of us who really ought to be using

                              micro controllers but would like the luxury of ethernet and usb and

                              programming in python or tcl rather than C or machine code. For mains

                              connected applications Sheeva plug must be it, but not so useful for batter

                              power perhaps?



                              Pete



                              --

                              Peter Chant

                              http://www.petezill a.co.uk





























                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • sevensins777
                              For a really low power solution (electronic hobby, etc), sort of a micro-controller on steroids with support to Linux please checkout Bifferboard:
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 10, 2009
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                                For a really low power solution (electronic hobby, etc), sort of a micro-controller on steroids with support to Linux please checkout Bifferboard:

                                http://bifferos.bizhat.com/
                                http://sites.google.com/site/bifferboard/ (wiki)

                                You can run it with OpenWrt (Linux distro used for routers), alternative OSs such as SlackWare, etc, and Special Light OS that will run from 1MB Flash.

                                I've done some nice things with OpenWrt, now trying to use it with the On-Board Flash Linux, making some simple C apps to communicate with external chips, getting both worlds together, Electronics and micro-controllers with Linux apps!

                                Regards,
                                Nelson.

                                --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Peter Chant <pete@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > On Wednesday 12 August 2009, Gregg C Levine wrote:
                                > > Hello!
                                > > I agree with you Corneliu regarding the Sheeva plug. I might also add that
                                > > my Linux distribution Slackware has been successfully ported to the thing.
                                > >
                                >
                                > I wonder if there are any other light weight low power alternatives, I've
                                > played with midge running on an edimax router board, but I wondered if there
                                > is something even lighter weight for those of us who really ought to be using
                                > micro controllers but would like the luxury of ethernet and usb and
                                > programming in python or tcl rather than C or machine code. For mains
                                > connected applications Sheeva plug must be it, but not so useful for batter
                                > power perhaps?
                                >
                                > Pete
                                >
                                >
                                > --
                                > Peter Chant
                                > http://www.petezilla.co.uk
                                >
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