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Re: [nslu2-general] Cloning & Restoring SLUG using Norton Ghost

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  • Ingo Flaschberger
    Dear alvin, ... easier way: connect new hd to the slug fdisk /dev/sdb (create partition) mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1 mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt tar cflp - . | ( cd /mnt ;
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 4, 2009
      Dear alvin,

      > Has anyone tried using Norton Ghost 2003 to Clone your SLUG partition and successfully port it to another Hard disk? I'm
      > thinking of using Norton Ghost to clone my old 250GB HDD (Connected to SLUG) to a new 1TB HDD. Is it possible and any
      > experiences? Your sharing will be greatly appreciated

      easier way:
      connect new hd to the slug
      fdisk /dev/sdb (create partition)
      mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
      mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
      tar cflp - . | ( cd /mnt ; tar xfvlp - )

      wait till finished, powerdown, unplug first disk, poweron

      Kind regards,
      Ingo Flaschberger
    • docbillnet
      I ve never had much luck with Norton Ghost and Linux partitions. You are probably just better off to use dd to copy, and then resize the partition to fill the
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 4, 2009
        I've never had much luck with Norton Ghost and Linux partitions. You are probably just better off to use dd to copy, and then resize the partition to fill the space.

        Be aware, there appears to be a 2TB limit on partition sizes.

        Bill

        --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "alvindustin" <alvindustin@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > Has anyone tried using Norton Ghost 2003 to Clone your SLUG partition and successfully port it to another Hard disk? I'm thinking of using Norton Ghost to clone my old 250GB HDD (Connected to SLUG) to a new 1TB HDD. Is it possible and any experiences? Your sharing will be greatly appreciated
        >
        > -alvin
        >
      • docbillnet
        While there are many people who use tar to copy file systems, I personally do not recommend it. The biggest problem is that tar will truncate very long paths,
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 4, 2009
          While there are many people who use tar to copy file systems, I personally do not recommend it. The biggest problem is that tar will truncate very long paths, and will not copy either ACL's or extended attributes. The code for handling sparse files and hard links in tar's is not very robust, but it will work with the correct flags.


          The following information is a bit dated, but mostly still accurate:

          http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/tar/tar_122.html

          An additional problems with tar is without --one-file-system flag, tar will span across mounts such as /proc and /sys. Tar is unable to look under the mounts to see files that are visible at boot time...
          A solution to this is to use a bind mount:

          mkdir /tmp/root
          mount --bind / /tmp/root
          cd /tmp/root
          tar cfSlp - | (cd /mnt;tar xfSlp -)

          Another problem is if your partition is bootable, the NSLU2 will only recognize it if it has the same UUID. Of course you can set the UUID with tune2fs.

          tune2fs /dev/sda1
          tune2fs -U <whatever uuid sda1 used> /dev/sdb1

          It is safer to copy the file system when not in use, but if you are going to copy it when in use, this is the technique I would use:

          fdisk /dev/sdb
          dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/dev/sdb1 bs=4096
          e2fsck -f /dev/sdb1
          resize2fs /dev/sdb1

          If your partition is not bootable, then you should probably use "tune2fs" to give the new partition a unique UUID.

          tunefs -U random /dev/sdb1

          If it is bootable, and you leave both the old and new drive plugged in, it is fairly arbitrary which drive the NSLU2 will boot from.


          Bill



          --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Ingo Flaschberger <if@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear alvin,
          >
          > > Has anyone tried using Norton Ghost 2003 to Clone your SLUG partition and successfully port it to another Hard disk? I'm
          > > thinking of using Norton Ghost to clone my old 250GB HDD (Connected to SLUG) to a new 1TB HDD. Is it possible and any
          > > experiences? Your sharing will be greatly appreciated
          >
          > easier way:
          > connect new hd to the slug
          > fdisk /dev/sdb (create partition)
          > mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
          > mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
          > tar cflp - . | ( cd /mnt ; tar xfvlp - )
          >
          > wait till finished, powerdown, unplug first disk, poweron
          >
          > Kind regards,
          > Ingo Flaschberger
          >
        • alvindustin
          ... Thank you all for your reply. I m only a basic Linux user and I m really afraid of deleting my data from my Old HDD using the dd command, hence i d like to
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 4, 2009
            --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "docbillnet" <yahoo@...> wrote:
            >
            > While there are many people who use tar to copy file systems, I personally do not recommend it. The biggest problem is that tar will truncate very long paths, and will not copy either ACL's or extended attributes. The code for handling sparse files and hard links in tar's is not very robust, but it will work with the correct flags.
            >
            >
            > The following information is a bit dated, but mostly still accurate:
            >
            > http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/tar/tar_122.html
            >
            > An additional problems with tar is without --one-file-system flag, tar will span across mounts such as /proc and /sys. Tar is unable to look under the mounts to see files that are visible at boot time...
            > A solution to this is to use a bind mount:
            >
            > mkdir /tmp/root
            > mount --bind / /tmp/root
            > cd /tmp/root
            > tar cfSlp - | (cd /mnt;tar xfSlp -)
            >
            > Another problem is if your partition is bootable, the NSLU2 will only recognize it if it has the same UUID. Of course you can set the UUID with tune2fs.
            >
            > tune2fs /dev/sda1
            > tune2fs -U <whatever uuid sda1 used> /dev/sdb1
            >
            > It is safer to copy the file system when not in use, but if you are going to copy it when in use, this is the technique I would use:
            >
            > fdisk /dev/sdb
            > dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/dev/sdb1 bs=4096
            > e2fsck -f /dev/sdb1
            > resize2fs /dev/sdb1
            >
            > If your partition is not bootable, then you should probably use "tune2fs" to give the new partition a unique UUID.
            >
            > tunefs -U random /dev/sdb1
            >
            > If it is bootable, and you leave both the old and new drive plugged in, it is fairly arbitrary which drive the NSLU2 will boot from.
            >
            >
            > Bill
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, Ingo Flaschberger <if@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear alvin,
            > >
            > > > Has anyone tried using Norton Ghost 2003 to Clone your SLUG partition and successfully port it to another Hard disk? I'm
            > > > thinking of using Norton Ghost to clone my old 250GB HDD (Connected to SLUG) to a new 1TB HDD. Is it possible and any
            > > > experiences? Your sharing will be greatly appreciated
            > >
            > > easier way:
            > > connect new hd to the slug
            > > fdisk /dev/sdb (create partition)
            > > mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
            > > mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
            > > tar cflp - . | ( cd /mnt ; tar xfvlp - )
            > >
            > > wait till finished, powerdown, unplug first disk, poweron
            > >
            > > Kind regards,
            > > Ingo Flaschberger
            > >


            Thank you all for your reply. I'm only a basic Linux user and I'm really afraid of deleting my data from my Old HDD using the dd command, hence i'd like to tryout GUI cloning softwares like ghost, etc..

            Are there any thourough documentation to completely backup the SLUG for total Linux newbies that aren't too intimidating? Looking at the articles on our How to Page on SLUG Backup, I admit I'll have to take a deep breath and alot of courage before I attempt to follow the commands! Any reply is greatly appreciated

            -Alvin
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