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Unslinging and "disk full"

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  • jim_nslu
    Apologies if this is something of a noob question, but I *have* read the FAQ and searched the Wiki and can t find anything that properly answers this one. I ve
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 9, 2007
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      Apologies if this is something of a noob question, but I *have* read
      the FAQ and searched the Wiki and can't find anything that properly
      answers this one.

      I've got an NSLU2 which I'm trying to unsling with the 6.8beta
      release. I'm using 2x320Gb HDs (WD My Book) and have run the basic
      firmware upgrade on the box and got both HDs formatted (NSLU
      reporting ext3 formatted) and with no data on either of the drives
      apart from whatever the NSLU puts on them when formatting.

      On booting, the web interface reports that both disks are attached
      with 100% of space free.

      Moving on to telnetting in and actually unslinging the NSLU, I'm
      rebooting minus drives, enabling telnet and then loggin in as root
      with the usual password. However, when I then plug in my primary HD
      (in this case disk1 - formatted this one first, and had it attached
      as disk1 when booting to format the other disk) I get the NSLU
      reporting on the web interface that there is 97% usage, and about 6Mb
      free space.

      Using df from the telnet session gives the same information.

      Finally, ignoring this and simply trying to unsling with the relevant
      command line in telnet comes back to me with an error saying that the
      volume is not there/available (don't have the exact text in front of
      me right now).

      I see from http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/FAQ/Disk2Showing0Free that
      there is a slightly similar issue encountered with the Linksys
      firmware 2.3R29, but that's the closest I can get and as above the df
      command returns the same disk usage data as reported by the web
      interface.

      Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated. MTIA.


      Jim.
    • Mike (mwester)
      ... The disk is recognized, mounted, and the Linksys firmware immediately unmounts it for some reason (usually a disk error of some sort). This leaves the web
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 10, 2007
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        > On booting, the web interface reports that both disks are attached
        > with 100% of space free.
        >
        > Moving on to telnetting in and actually unslinging the NSLU, I'm
        > rebooting minus drives, enabling telnet and then loggin in as root
        > with the usual password. However, when I then plug in my primary HD
        > (in this case disk1 - formatted this one first, and had it attached
        > as disk1 when booting to format the other disk) I get the NSLU
        > reporting on the web interface that there is 97% usage, and about 6Mb
        > free space.

        The disk is recognized, mounted, and the Linksys firmware immediately
        unmounts it for some reason (usually a disk error of some sort). This
        leaves the web interface thinking a disk is present, but when it goes to
        check the size and space, it ends up checking the underlying flash memory,
        instead of the now-unmounted disk. Hence it reports 6MBytes in size -- the
        size of the flash root filesystem.

        The fix depends on what's wrong. You state that if the disk is left plugged
        in, and the slug rebooted, then it is mounted and stays mounted in the
        normal fashion? If so, it would indicate that the device, for some reason,
        does not like being hot-plugged. Unfortunately, we need to hot-plug it,
        because when you boot with the disk attached, the Linksys firmware uses the
        password database from the disk -- and we don't know those passwords.

        The most common problem is that the disk structure is damaged in some way
        (you *did* shutdown the unit from the GUI, rather than just unplugging it,
        right?).

        Run "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb2" to check the conf partition of the drive, and
        "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb1" to check the data partition. Once they both come
        back clean, shutdown the NSLU2 (if you don't like the GUI, you can type
        "DO_Shutdown" instead).

        Unplug the disk, reboot, telnet in, plug the disk in, give it a little while
        to run the quota check, and then see if it stays mounted this time. If so,
        you're ok to run the unsling utility.

        Mike (mwester)
      • jim_nslu
        Thanks Mike. I ll give that a try tonight. Jim ... immediately ... This ... goes to ... memory, ... size -- the ... left plugged ... the ... reason, ... plug
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 12, 2007
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          Thanks Mike. I'll give that a try tonight.

          Jim


          --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "Mike \(mwester\)"
          <mwester@...> wrote:
          >
          > The disk is recognized, mounted, and the Linksys firmware
          immediately
          > unmounts it for some reason (usually a disk error of some sort).
          This
          > leaves the web interface thinking a disk is present, but when it
          goes to
          > check the size and space, it ends up checking the underlying flash
          memory,
          > instead of the now-unmounted disk. Hence it reports 6MBytes in
          size -- the
          > size of the flash root filesystem.
          >
          > The fix depends on what's wrong. You state that if the disk is
          left plugged
          > in, and the slug rebooted, then it is mounted and stays mounted in
          the
          > normal fashion? If so, it would indicate that the device, for some
          reason,
          > does not like being hot-plugged. Unfortunately, we need to hot-
          plug it,
          > because when you boot with the disk attached, the Linksys firmware
          uses the
          > password database from the disk -- and we don't know those
          passwords.
          >
          > The most common problem is that the disk structure is damaged in
          some way
          > (you *did* shutdown the unit from the GUI, rather than just
          unplugging it,
          > right?).
          >
          > Run "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb2" to check the conf partition of the
          drive, and
          > "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb1" to check the data partition. Once they
          both come
          > back clean, shutdown the NSLU2 (if you don't like the GUI, you can
          type
          > "DO_Shutdown" instead).
          >
          > Unplug the disk, reboot, telnet in, plug the disk in, give it a
          little while
          > to run the quota check, and then see if it stays mounted this
          time. If so,
          > you're ok to run the unsling utility.
          >
          > Mike (mwester)
          >
        • jim_nslu
          Finally got a chance to sit down and give this a try. I m booting up the NSLU2, enabling telnet, telnetting in with the basic root user credentials, and then
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 18, 2007
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            Finally got a chance to sit down and give this a try. I'm booting up
            the NSLU2, enabling telnet, telnetting in with the basic root user
            credentials, and then plugging in the disk 1.

            Every time that I try to use the fsck command, I just get it reporting
            "invalid option". Any additional/alternative suggestions? Can I just
            try reformatting the drives from the web interface, or is it worth
            trying some of the options detailed at:
            http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/FAQ/RepairingDiskErrors
            such as getting a Linux LiveCD?

            I've also tried plugging the drives into my windows box and seeing if
            they will be recognised (I've got the driver from
            http://www.fs-driver.org/) but the disk is being recognised as a USB
            device, but no drive is being allocated on the machine and nothing
            seems accessible.

            Thanks :(

            --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "jim_nslu" <jim_nslu@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Mike. I'll give that a try tonight.
            >
            > Jim
            >
            >
            > --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "Mike \(mwester\)"
            > <mwester@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The disk is recognized, mounted, and the Linksys firmware
            > immediately
            > > unmounts it for some reason (usually a disk error of some sort).
            > This
            > > leaves the web interface thinking a disk is present, but when it
            > goes to
            > > check the size and space, it ends up checking the underlying flash
            > memory,
            > > instead of the now-unmounted disk. Hence it reports 6MBytes in
            > size -- the
            > > size of the flash root filesystem.
            > >
            > > The fix depends on what's wrong. You state that if the disk is
            > left plugged
            > > in, and the slug rebooted, then it is mounted and stays mounted in
            > the
            > > normal fashion? If so, it would indicate that the device, for some
            > reason,
            > > does not like being hot-plugged. Unfortunately, we need to hot-
            > plug it,
            > > because when you boot with the disk attached, the Linksys firmware
            > uses the
            > > password database from the disk -- and we don't know those
            > passwords.
            > >
            > > The most common problem is that the disk structure is damaged in
            > some way
            > > (you *did* shutdown the unit from the GUI, rather than just
            > unplugging it,
            > > right?).
            > >
            > > Run "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb2" to check the conf partition of the
            > drive, and
            > > "fsck.ext3 -f /dev/sdb1" to check the data partition. Once they
            > both come
            > > back clean, shutdown the NSLU2 (if you don't like the GUI, you can
            > type
            > > "DO_Shutdown" instead).
            > >
            > > Unplug the disk, reboot, telnet in, plug the disk in, give it a
            > little while
            > > to run the quota check, and then see if it stays mounted this
            > time. If so,
            > > you're ok to run the unsling utility.
            > >
            > > Mike (mwester)
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