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Re: USB drive spindown...

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  • Todd Zebert
    I had a similar question, so I asked both WD and Maxtor(who make the drives I m using). I ve included the responsed below. Perhaps USB/IDE controller in the
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 2, 2005
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      I had a similar question, so I asked both WD and Maxtor(who make the
      drives I'm using). I've included the responsed below. Perhaps
      USB/IDE controller in the case will do so?

      ===============================
      Subject
      Drive native power-saving (standby) spin down?

      Discussion Thread
      Response (Don S.) 05/25/2005 04:52 PM
      Dear Todd,

      Thank you for contacting Western Digital Customer Service and Support.

      Though Western Digital drives support the powe saving feature it is
      only controlable by the BIOS and operating system.

      Sincerely,
      Don S.
      Western Digital Service and Support
      http://support.wdc.com
      Customer (Todd) 05/24/2005 05:46 PM
      I would like to know if this drive has any native power-saving
      (standby) spin down capability, outside of what the PC BIOS or OS may
      have.

      WD Caviar Special Edition EIDE drive WD2500JB

      Thanks,
      Todd

      ====================================

      Subject
      Native drive power-saving (standby) spin down?

      Discussion Thread
      Response (TSBrian54) 05/25/2005 02:26 PM
      Dear Todd:

      Thank you for sending your MAXTOR E-mail inquiry.

      Maxtor ATA drives do not have native power management, and all power
      management is controlled by your computer. Therefore, all power
      management settings for this drive are determined by your BIOS and
      operating system.

      If you have any additional questions, please let me know.

      Thank you,
      Maxtor Technical Assistance
      Brian Cowan
      1-800 2MAXTOR (voice)
      353 1 204 1111 (International)


      Customer 05/24/2005 06:41 PM
      I would like to know if this drive has any native power-saving
      (standby) spin down capability, outside of what the PC BIOS or OS may
      have,

      Maxtor Ultra16 PATA 7200 250GB hard drive, L01R250
      =======================================



      --- In nslu2-general@yahoogroups.com, "bushtor" <bushtor@y...> wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      > I have read a few postings here about connected USB drives which do
      > not spindown after a preset time of non-activity. Right now I'm in
      > the process of purchasing a new backup system and I want to use a
      > NSLU2 and two USB harddrives.
      >
      > Do you have any success stories of having two drives connected and
      > automatically power down gracefully after a preset time delay?
      Which
      > brands / current models actually *do* work?
      >
      > Have any of you seen USB external controllers which supports *two*
      drives?
      >
      > Thanks for comments on these issues
      >
      > best regards
      >
      > Tor
    • Philip Johnson
      Hmmm, what I was going to suggest has been mentioned on the list before and I m not sure if it worked. However, in case you want to give it a shot, it
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2005
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        Hmmm, what I was going to suggest has been mentioned on the list
        before and I'm not sure if it worked.

        However, in case you want to give it a shot, it basically entails
        using hdparm with the -S flag. From the hdparm manpage:

        -S
        Set the standby (spindown) timeout for the drive. This value is used
        by the drive to determine how long to wait (with no disk activity)
        before turning off the spindle motor to save power. Under such
        circumstances, the drive may take as long as 30 seconds to respond to
        a subsequent disk access, though most drives are much quicker. The
        encoding of the timeout value is somewhat peculiar. A value of zero
        means "off". Values from 1 to 240 specify multiples of 5 seconds, for
        timeouts from 5 seconds to 20 minutes. Values from 241 to 251 specify
        from 1 to 11 units of 30 minutes, for timeouts from 30 minutes to 5.5
        hours. A value of 252 signifies a timeout of 21 minutes, 253 sets a
        vendor-defined timeout, and 255 is interpreted as 21 minutes plus 15
        seconds.

        If this works, you'll probably need to create a diversion script to
        set it at boot.

        Regards,

        Philip Johnson
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