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Re: Articles on Organizational Change

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  • Michael Whitehead-Bust
    Here are some of the responses we received to the following question about organizational change: I am desperately looking for articles or studies which were
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2010
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      Here are some of the responses we received to the following question about organizational change:

      "I am desperately looking for articles or studies which were written or done on the organizational challenges and how to deal with tensions arising from the decision to start a social enterprise and to start generating revenue."


      (1) From: Tamra Thetford <tamra.thetford@...>

      The Aspen Institute’s FIELD Program has a body of work around the larger topic of non-profit sustainability that may be of use to you. Included in the work is a focus on Social Enterprise. There is a Sustainability Literature Review (http://fieldus.org/Projects/SustainabilityResources.html#overview) with an entire section on Social Enterprise that includes discussion of the organizational impacts of starting a social enterprise. In particular the publication: New Social Entrepreneurs: The Success, Challenges and Lessons of Non-Profit Enterprise Creation, edited by Jed Emerson and Fay Twersky may be of help to you.

      Additionally—you can find other resources on our Sustainability work including in the area of Social Enterprise here:http://fieldus.org/Projects/pdf/sustainability.pdf


      Regards,
      Tamra Thetford
      MicroTest Program Manager
      Aspen Institute
      One Dupont Circle, Suite 700
      Washington, DC 20036


      (2) From: John Herron" <jherron@...>

      My comment is to first challenge the premise that there should be tension between generating revenue and sticking to the mission. I like to quote the Sisters of Mercy who run hospitals and say, “No Margin, No Mission”. All organizations need to generate revenue to perform. Adding a social enterprise is only adding a new source of revenue using business principles. Now to your question. All the literature on organizational change applies here. For profit and not for profit organizations respond to internal and external factors that are either opportunities or demands to change. Adding social enterprise can be presented as a way of responding to the particular opportunity or demand that your organization is facing.

      John D. Herron MSW, MBA
      CEO
      Harbor City Services, Inc
      Baltimore, MD 21227


      (3) From: Eko Nomos <mary_ferguson@...>

      We wrote a series of papers for the Toronto Enterprise Fund a few years ago. Section 4 might have some useful information for you.

      http://www.torontoenterprisefund.ca/_bin/weLearned/business.cfm

      Mary Ferguson, Eko Nomos


      (4) From: Jim Fruchterman <jim@...>

      I thought the REDF boxed set had something on internal culture: that’s where I remember first reading about the challenges of injecting a social enterprise into a traditional social service agency culture.

      Also, http://www.sereporter.com/?q=node/193


      Jim Fruchterman
      President and CEO, Benetech
      Email: jim@...
    • Sheila Simpson
      It is all change management - it doesn t matter whether you are introducing a social enterprise or changing the way that you deliver services or how you do
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2010
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        It is all change management - it doesn't matter whether you are
        introducing a social enterprise or changing the way that you deliver
        services or how you do your work, it is still about change management
        and there are lots of great resources for that. Try "Our Iceberg is
        Melting" which is a "business fable" - great read and great way to start
        an interesting conversation with your team about organizational change.

        [Moderator's note: Here is some information about "Our Iceberg is Melting":

        Our Iceberg Is Melting - by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber

        Our Iceberg Is Melting is a simple fable about doing well in an ever-changing world. Based on the award-winning work of Harvard's John Kotter, it is a story that has been used to help thousands of people and organizations.

        The fable is about a penguin colony in Antarctica. A group of beautiful emperor penguins live as they have for many years. Then, one curious bird discovers a potentially devastating problem threatening their home, and pretty much no one listens to him. The characters in the story, Fred, Alice, Louis, Buddy, the Professor, and NoNo, are like people we recognize � even ourselves. Their tale is one of resistance to change and heroic action, seemingly intractable obstacles and the most clever tactics for dealing with those obstacles. It's a story that is occurring in different forms all around us today � but the penguins handle the very real challenges a great deal better than most of us. Our Iceberg Is Melting is based on pioneering work that shows how the 8 Steps produce needed change in any sort of group. It's a story that can be enjoyed by anyone while at the same time providing invaluable guidance for a world that just keeps moving faster and faster.

        For more information about Dr. Kotter's 8 Steps, please refer to his book, Our Iceberg Is Melting.

        Source: http://www.kotterinternational.com/kotterprinciples/OurIceberg.aspx

        -----Original Message-----
        From: npEnterprise@yahoogroups.com [mailto:npEnterprise@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Michael Whitehead-Bust
        Sent: August 31, 2010 2:06 PM
        To: npenterprise@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [npEnterprise] Re: Articles on Organizational Change

        Here are some of the responses we received to the following question
        about organizational change:

        "I am desperately looking for articles or studies which were written or
        done on the organizational challenges and how to deal with tensions
        arising from the decision to start a social enterprise and to start
        generating revenue."


        (1) From: Tamra Thetford <tamra.thetford@...>

        The Aspen Institute's FIELD Program has a body of work around the larger
        topic of non-profit sustainability that may be of use to you. Included
        in the work is a focus on Social Enterprise. There is a Sustainability
        Literature Review
        (http://fieldus.org/Projects/SustainabilityResources.html#overview) with
        an entire section on Social Enterprise that includes discussion of the
        organizational impacts of starting a social enterprise. In particular
        the publication: New Social Entrepreneurs: The Success, Challenges and
        Lessons of Non-Profit Enterprise Creation, edited by Jed Emerson and Fay
        Twersky may be of help to you.

        Additionally-you can find other resources on our Sustainability work
        including in the area of Social Enterprise
        here:http://fieldus.org/Projects/pdf/sustainability.pdf


        Regards,
        Tamra Thetford
        MicroTest Program Manager
        Aspen Institute
        One Dupont Circle, Suite 700
        Washington, DC 20036


        (2) From: John Herron" <jherron@...>

        My comment is to first challenge the premise that there should be
        tension between generating revenue and sticking to the mission. I like
        to quote the Sisters of Mercy who run hospitals and say, "No Margin, No
        Mission". All organizations need to generate revenue to perform.
        Adding a social enterprise is only adding a new source of revenue using
        business principles. Now to your question. All the literature on
        organizational change applies here. For profit and not for profit
        organizations respond to internal and external factors that are either
        opportunities or demands to change. Adding social enterprise can be
        presented as a way of responding to the particular opportunity or demand
        that your organization is facing.

        John D. Herron MSW, MBA
        CEO
        Harbor City Services, Inc
        Baltimore, MD 21227


        (3) From: Eko Nomos <mary_ferguson@...>

        We wrote a series of papers for the Toronto Enterprise Fund a few years
        ago. Section 4 might have some useful information for you.

        http://www.torontoenterprisefund.ca/_bin/weLearned/business.cfm

        Mary Ferguson, Eko Nomos


        (4) From: Jim Fruchterman <jim@...>

        I thought the REDF boxed set had something on internal culture: that's
        where I remember first reading about the challenges of injecting a
        social enterprise into a traditional social service agency culture.

        Also, http://www.sereporter.com/?q=node/193


        Jim Fruchterman
        President and CEO, Benetech
        Email: jim@...








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