Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

Expand Messages
  • sramanand
    Registration (requested, free): http://www.iasahome.org/iasaweb/appmanager/home/chapterdetail When: Thursday August 17th, 6-8 pm Snacks & soda will be served
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
      Registration (requested, free):

      http://www.iasahome.org/iasaweb/appmanager/home/chapterdetail

      When:

      Thursday August 17th, 6-8 pm

      Snacks & soda will be served

      Where:

      FGM 4th Floor

      12021 Sunset Hills Road Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190

      From Dulles Toll Road (267) take exit to Reston Parkway, turn right
      after ramp, take first left at Sunset Hills Road, take second left
      into parking lot, park on right side.

      Topic: "Profiling the Agile Architect"

      Abstract:

      At first glance, agile methodologies seem to de-emphasize the role of
      the software architect. One of the principles of the agile manifesto
      states that "the best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge
      from self-organizing teams." Nevertheless, in my work leading and
      coaching agile teams, I have observed that having an effective
      architect on the project is essential to the overall success of the
      project and of the system being built. In this talk I describe a
      profile of the ideal architect on an agile software development team.
      I discuss this person's day-to-day activities, and explain how an
      individual with good architectural skills integrates themselves with a
      team that is evolving the design incrementally and striving for "the
      simplest thing that could possibly work."

      Speaker:

      Jeff Nielsen is Chief Scientist at Digital Focus, where he trains and
      mentors teams and individuals in the use of agile methodologies. Jeff
      has over 19 years of commercial software development experience, and
      has architected a number of mission-critical and enterprise-level
      systems. Since spearheading the first large-scale XP project at
      Digital Focus, he has spent much of the past six years coaching agile
      teams for clients including America Online, Fannie Mae, Sallie Mae,
      and FHLB.
      --------------

      Please let me know if you have questions.

      Regards,
      Ramanand Singh
      IASA - Co-Chair, Mid-Atlantic Chapter
      NOVAJUG - Board Member
    • jawabean
      i was always wondering, what do they mean by mission-critical and enterprise-level in resumes. argyn
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
        i was always wondering, what do they mean by "mission-critical" and
        "enterprise-level" in resumes.

        argyn

        --- In novajug@yahoogroups.com, "sramanand" <rsingh@...> wrote:
        > has over 19 years of commercial software development experience, and
        > has architected a number of mission-critical and enterprise-level
        > systems.
      • Jenkins, Bart (NE)
        My interpretation of mission critical is that the application is central to your operations and must be very robust--that is, it must have all the good
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
          My interpretation of "mission critical" is that the application is central to your operations and must be very robust--that is, it must have all the good "ilities" built into it (availability, reliability, etc.) and must be up 24/7 and if it goes down, you lose money by the minute.  Enterprise Level means it is available across the various depts and functions of the company.  One does necessarily imply the other.  For example, if your enterprise time-keeping system goes down for half-a-day, you might not have any impact as its back-office operations activity (not mission critical) , but if the website through which you make most of your sales (mission critical) goes down, you lose money immediately (lost sales).
           
          Does that help?
           
          Bart


          From: novajug@yahoogroups.com [mailto:novajug@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jawabean
          Sent: Monday, August 14, 2006 12:05 PM
          To: novajug@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [novajug] Re: IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

          i was always wondering, what do they mean by "mission-critical" and
          "enterprise- level" in resumes.

          argyn

          --- In novajug@yahoogroups .com, "sramanand" <rsingh@...> wrote:

          > has over 19 years of commercial
          software development experience, and
          > has architected a number of
          mission-critical and enterprise-level
          > systems.

        • Andrew Semprebon
          I don t think mission criticial neccessarily implies 24/7. There are plenty (in fact, I d guess most) organizations that are not doing business 24 hours a
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
            I don't think "mission criticial" neccessarily implies 24/7. There are plenty (in fact, I'd guess most) organizations that are not doing business 24 hours a day, and thus can afford to have mission critical systems down for a few hours on weekends/overnight. Now if you are talking about large commercial web sites, than yeah, 24/7 is probably required.

            On 8/14/06, Jenkins, Bart (NE) <bart.jenkins@...> wrote:
            My interpretation of "mission critical" is that the application is central to your operations and must be very robust--that is, it must have all the good "ilities" built into it (availability, reliability, etc.) and must be up 24/7 and if it goes down, you lose money by the minute.  Enterprise Level means it is available across the various depts and functions of the company.  One does necessarily imply the other.  For example, if your enterprise time-keeping system goes down for half-a-day, you might not have any impact as its back-office operations activity (not mission critical) , but if the website through which you make most of your sales (mission critical) goes down, you lose money immediately (lost sales).
             
            Does that help?
             
            Bart


            From: novajug@yahoogroups.com [mailto:novajug@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jawabean
            Sent: Monday, August 14, 2006 12:05 PM
            To: novajug@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [novajug] Re: IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

            i was always wondering, what do they mean by "mission-critical" and
            "enterprise-level" in resumes.

            argyn

            --- In novajug@yahoogroups.com, "sramanand" <rsingh@...> wrote:
            > has over 19 years of commercial software development experience, and
            > has architected a number of mission-critical and enterprise-level
            > systems.





            --
            --
            Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystems.com/
          • jawabean
            ... suppose, that i wrote a Excel macro for a little auto repair shop, and it s used every day to track customer s orders. can i claim it as mission
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
              --- In novajug@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Semprebon" <semprebon@...>
              suppose, that i wrote a Excel macro for a little auto repair shop, and
              it's used every day to track customer's orders. can i claim it as
              "mission critical"?

              argyn


              wrote:
              >
              > I don't think "mission criticial" neccessarily implies 24/7. There are
              > plenty (in fact, I'd guess most) organizations that are not doing
              business
              > 24 hours a day, and thus can afford to have mission critical systems
              down
              > for a few hours on weekends/overnight. Now if you are talking about
              large
              > commercial web sites, than yeah, 24/7 is probably required.
              >
            • Andrew Semprebon
              Probably not. You mission (I adssume) in that case would be repairing autos, not tracking orders. ... -- -- Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystems.com/
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                Probably not. You mission (I adssume) in that case would be repairing autos, not tracking orders.

                On 8/14/06, jawabean < jawabean@...> wrote:

                --- In novajug@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Semprebon" <semprebon@...>
                suppose, that i wrote a Excel macro for a little auto repair shop, and
                it's used every day to track customer's orders. can i claim it as
                "mission critical"?

                argyn



                wrote:
                >
                > I don't think "mission criticial" neccessarily implies 24/7. There are
                > plenty (in fact, I'd guess most) organizations that are not doing
                business
                > 24 hours a day, and thus can afford to have mission critical systems
                down
                > for a few hours on weekends/overnight. Now if you are talking about
                large
                > commercial web sites, than yeah, 24/7 is probably required.
                >




                --
                --
                Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystems.com/
              • Jenkins, Bart (NE)
                If you have planned downtimes, that can still be part of a mission-critical system. I should add that mission-critical might involve more than money. If
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                  If you have "planned" downtimes, that can still be part of a mission-critical  system.  I should add that mission-critical might involve more than money.  If it is a manned space flight system, mission-critical might mean the difference between life and death if the system goes down.  Medical diagnostic equipment is another that comes to mind. 
                   
                  If I needed a pacemaker, I would not want the software that runs my pacemaker to go down from time to time.
                   
                  Bart


                  From: novajug@yahoogroups.com [mailto:novajug@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Semprebon
                  Sent: Monday, August 14, 2006 1:24 PM
                  To: novajug@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [novajug] Re: IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

                  I don't think "mission criticial" neccessarily implies 24/7. There are plenty (in fact, I'd guess most) organizations that are not doing business 24 hours a day, and thus can afford to have mission critical systems down for a few hours on weekends/overnight. Now if you are talking about large commercial web sites, than yeah, 24/7 is probably required.

                  On 8/14/06, Jenkins, Bart (NE) <bart.jenkins@ gd-ais.com> wrote:
                  My interpretation of "mission critical" is that the application is central to your operations and must be very robust--that is, it must have all the good "ilities" built into it (availability, reliability, etc.) and must be up 24/7 and if it goes down, you lose money by the minute.  Enterprise Level means it is available across the various depts and functions of the company.  One does necessarily imply the other.  For example, if your enterprise time-keeping system goes down for half-a-day, you might not have any impact as its back-office operations activity (not mission critical) , but if the website through which you make most of your sales (mission critical) goes down, you lose money immediately (lost sales).
                   
                  Does that help?
                   
                  Bart


                  From: novajug@yahoogroups .com [mailto:novajug@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of jawabean
                  Sent: Monday, August 14, 2006 12:05 PM
                  To: novajug@yahoogroups .com
                  Subject: [novajug] Re: IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

                  i was always wondering, what do they mean by "mission-critical" and
                  "enterprise-level" in resumes.

                  argyn

                  --- In novajug@yahoogroups .com, "sramanand" <rsingh@...> wrote:
                  > has over 19 years of commercial software development experience, and
                  > has architected a number of mission-critical and enterprise-level
                  > systems.





                  --
                  --
                  Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystem s.com/

                • Jenkins, Bart (NE)
                  Yep, just because your macro fails one afternoon doesn t mean you can t continue repairing autos and receiving cash. You would just have to fail-over
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                    <grin>
                    Yep, just because your macro fails one afternoon doesn't mean you can't continue repairing autos and receiving cash.  You would just have to fail-over to your backup process of record keeping (3 x 5 cards maybe)
                    </grin>
                     
                    <serious>
                    But if the app that opens the parachutes on a capsule containine 3 astronauts coming down in the earth's atmosphere, fails, and the capsule hits the ocean water at mach 1, that I would consider part of a mission critical system.
                    </serious>
                     
                    Bart


                    From: novajug@yahoogroups.com [mailto:novajug@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Semprebon
                    Sent: Monday, August 14, 2006 2:01 PM
                    To: novajug@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [novajug] Re: IASA Meeting - Profiling the Agile Architect

                    Probably not. You mission (I adssume) in that case would be repairing autos, not tracking orders.

                    On 8/14/06, jawabean < jawabean@iname. com> wrote:

                    --- In novajug@yahoogroups .com, "Andrew Semprebon" <semprebon@.. .>
                    suppose, that i wrote a Excel macro for a little auto repair shop, and
                    it's used every day to track customer's orders. can i claim it as
                    "mission critical"?

                    argyn



                    wrote:
                    >
                    > I don't think "mission criticial" neccessarily implies 24/7. There are
                    > plenty (in fact, I'd guess most) organizations that are not doing
                    business
                    > 24 hours a day, and thus can afford to have mission critical systems
                    down
                    > for a few hours on weekends/overnight. Now if you are talking about
                    large
                    > commercial web sites, than yeah, 24/7 is probably required.
                    >




                    --
                    --
                    Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystem s.com/

                  • kamran shafiei
                    Both of these terms are context sensitive: 1. Every application is mission critical if it s being used to fulfill a mission (although for time sensitive
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                      Both of these terms are context sensitive:
                      1. Every application is mission critical if it's being
                      used to fulfill a mission (although for time sensitive
                      missions things like scalability and availability are
                      necessary to define an application as mission
                      critical)

                      2. Every application is enterprise level if it is
                      being used by an enterprise (although for global
                      enterprises things like I18N, L10N and timezones are
                      necessary to define an application as enterprise
                      level)

                      1 & 2 => every application is mission critical and
                      enterrprise level

                      At the end of the day these are just marketing terms
                      that might help you make more money or feel more
                      important.



                      __________________________________________________
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      http://mail.yahoo.com
                    • jawabean
                      ... if you Google mission critical resume , you ll be amazed to find out how many people design program parachute opener systems for space capsules argyn
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                        --- In novajug@yahoogroups.com, "Jenkins, Bart \(NE\)"
                        <bart.jenkins@...> wrote:
                        > <serious>
                        > But if the app that opens the parachutes on a capsule containine 3
                        > astronauts coming down in the earth's atmosphere, fails, and the capsule
                        > hits the ocean water at mach 1, that I would consider part of a mission
                        > critical system.
                        > </serious>

                        if you Google "mission critical resume", you'll be amazed to find out
                        how many people design program parachute opener systems for space capsules

                        argyn
                      • Andrew Semprebon
                        The fact that these terms are abused by marketers and job applicants does not, IMHO, render them useless. Yet. Although I admit I ve pretty much given up on
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                          The fact that these terms are abused by marketers and job applicants does not, IMHO, render them useless. Yet.

                          Although I admit I've pretty much given up on "enterprise"...

                          On 8/14/06, kamran shafiei <kamran_shafiei@...> wrote:

                          Both of these terms are context sensitive:
                          1. Every application is mission critical if it's being
                          used to fulfill a mission (although for time sensitive
                          missions things like scalability and availability are
                          necessary to define an application as mission
                          critical)

                          2. Every application is enterprise level if it is
                          being used by an enterprise (although for global
                          enterprises things like I18N, L10N and timezones are
                          necessary to define an application as enterprise
                          level)

                          1 & 2 => every application is mission critical and
                          enterrprise level

                          At the end of the day these are just marketing terms
                          that might help you make more money or feel more
                          important.


                          __________________________________________________
                          Do You Yahoo!?
                          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                          http://mail.yahoo.com




                          --
                          --
                          Andrew Semprebon * http://www.eqsystems.com/
                        • kamran shafiei
                          Although in more Software Engineerically correct terms mission critical and enterprise level application translate to nothing more than a set of non functional
                          Message 12 of 13 , Aug 14, 2006
                            Although in more Software Engineerically correct
                            terms mission critical and enterprise level
                            application translate to nothing more than a set of
                            non functional requirements.
                            So saying I have developed such a system means "I have
                            developed a system that had non functional
                            requirements too" !!


                            __________________________________________________
                            Do You Yahoo!?
                            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                            http://mail.yahoo.com
                          • Kirk S. Kalvar
                            Correction: http://midatlantic.iasahome.org/iasaweb/appmanager/home/chapterdetail
                            Message 13 of 13 , Aug 17, 2006
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.