Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda

Expand Messages
  • cohensmilk1
    Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda This morning, from about 2 AM until sometime after 5 AM when the birds began to sing and the sky began to brighten, I surfed the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
      Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda

      This morning, from about 2 AM until sometime after 5 AM when
      the birds began to sing and the sky began to brighten, I
      surfed the Internet seeking words of wisdom regarding the
      obesity epidemic which plagues 21st century western civilization.
      After reading hundreds of articles, each with a uniquely absurd
      theory of its own, I've concluded that there is only one
      foolproof method that any fool can follow for an immediately
      effective weight loss protocol.

      We must all simply get into our cars, just as my own state governor
      recently did, and drive one end of New Jersey's Garden State Parkway
      during rush hour at speeds approaching 100 miles per hour while
      not wearing a seat belt. A thigh weighs about 40 pounds, and one
      would instantly lose up to one square foot of ugly cellulite in the
      process. One does not even have to visit a gym after his one-way
      ride to weight loss. Just lay there while your jaw is wired shut
      and your stomach and other internal organs are stapled. Post-accident
      mirrors provide instant feedback which helps to motivate those on
      this health plan to get sick to one's stomach and permanently lose
      his appetite.

      This plan works better than all of the stupidly drawn conclusions
      from ignorantly taught nutritionists who seem to be the reason for
      today's obesity epidemic. I offer only an instant cure, and I do
      so tongue in cheek...or tongue on lap, or tongue on
      floor mat, or wherever that tongue ended up after cars merge with
      guard rails at speeds reserved for re-entry space shuttle missions.

      So, what was the last thing that went through Governor Corzine's
      mind before his now famous accident? If you said, "The control
      panel" you'd be half right. However, the governor lived, thank
      goodness, because my state of New Jersey is notorious for awful
      leaders who betray the health of its constituents. People like
      Christy Whitman who served as George Bush's Secretary of whatever
      agency it was that told the cleanup workers on 9/12, "Trust us,
      the air is perfectly safe to breathe." Those people won't be part
      of America's obesity epidemic either, as various cancers overtake
      their own body's ability to gain weight.

      Why is it that the N-people (nutritionists and nincompoops) have
      no ability to see what people were eating when there was no
      obesity epidemic?

      Why is it that in just thirty years, there has been one major
      change to the American diet, and the D-people (dummies and
      dieticians) were not required to take arithmetic as part of
      their training in order to add the number one to a second
      number one and come up with the resulting number two?

      "Overweight children are usually the victims of the
      dietary habits of the adult members of the family...
      Reducing dietary fat to levels necessary to the control
      of cholesterol cannot be achieved if a child drinks
      whole milk or eats cheese."

      Charles Attwood, M.D.

      Today, they blame it on soda, so soda machines are
      removed from schools. One finds so many conflicts
      of interest with USDA employees holding seats of
      power. These decision makers have strong ties to
      the dairy industry, but similar relations with
      soda manufacturers are rare. See:

      <http://www.notmilk.com/usdatest.html>

      Today we demonstrate that although soda may be a part
      of the overall obesity problem seen over the past 30
      years, the major factor is increased cheese consumption.

      The differences in soda and cheese consumption during the
      period of time from 1970 through 2000 were obtained from
      USDA food consumption publications. Data were also obtained
      for 1970 soda and cheese consumption rates by performing a
      Google search.

      Here is what was discovered. In 1970, the per capita
      consumption of soda in America was 29.9 gallons. By 2000,
      that number had increased to 37.7 gallons.

      In 1970, the per capita consumption of cheese was 10
      pounds. By 2000, that number had increased to 29.8 pounds.
      In 2007, the average American will consume 32 pounds
      of cheese.

      Just one factor was considered. Calories. The human body
      does not care where it gets its fuel. Sugar, fat, protein,
      carbs...it's all fuel to be converted into energy. Extra
      fuel is stored as fat. So...in fairness to dairy, neither
      fat nor cholesterol content was considered. Just calories.

      One pound of American cheese contains 1,490 calories.
      One gallon of cola contains 1,592 calories.

      Here is what was found.

      In 1970, when I was in college and most people were slim,
      the average American each day consumed 130 calories from
      soda and 71 calories from cheese. Criticize what you may,
      but that proportion kept us relatively slim.

      By 2000, the average American was consuming daily 164
      calories from soda and 122 calories from cheese.

      What we must do, then, is determine the differences. That
      is the key to the obesity epidemic. The baseline (1970
      numbers) did not result in large numbers of overweight
      children as there are in 2007. That trend resulted from
      the increased consumption of one or both commodities.

      BOTTOM LINE

      From 1970 until 2000, the average American consumed
      an additional 34 calories each day from soda. From
      1970 until 2000, the average American consumed an
      additional 50 calories each day from cheese.

      In July of 2000, the Journal of the Archives of
      Disease in Childhood reported:

      "From 1965 to 1996, a considerable shift in the
      adolescent diet occurred...increases occurred in the
      consumption of higher fat potatoes and mixed dishes
      (pizza, macaroni cheese)...These trends, far greater
      than for US adults, may compromise health of the future
      US population."

      Since there are 365 days in a year, and 3,500 calories
      in a pound, I calculated that during the 4 years of
      high school, a teenager would gain 14 additional
      pounds from his or her soda consumption and 21
      additional pounds from his or her increased cheese
      consumption.

      Oh, yes...one major difference between the two
      commodities that I have not yet considered in the
      obesity argument, but do so now. Soda does not contain
      powerful growth hormones. Growth hormones instruct
      cells to grow. Combine the large amount of calories
      found in cheese with saturated animal fat and
      cholesterol and an abundance of naturally occurring
      concentrated growth hormones, and the body does what
      it is instructed to do. Grow! Place the blame for
      obesity where it rightfully belongs. Cheeseheadism
      is what causes obesity. Dairy marketing geniuses
      have been deceiving Americans, but the real numbers
      lack the capability to lie.

      Robert Cohen
      http://www.notmilk.com
      i4crob@...
    • cohensmilk1
      Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda Yesterday (February 20, 2008), I wrote about obesity epidemics: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/notmilk/message/2935 Many
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 21, 2008
        Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda

        Yesterday (February 20, 2008), I wrote about obesity epidemics:

        http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/notmilk/message/2935

        Many people responded by blaming obesity on soda consumption.
        When I was in college when America had no obesity epidemic.
        The year was 1973. We drank plenty of soda in those days.

        A rule of thumb: If you weigh 100 pounds, multiply your weight
        by 14 times to determine your caloric needs. A 100-pound person
        would require 1,400 calories per day. It that person ate just
        1,300 calories per day he/she would lose one pound in 35 days
        It that person ate 1,500 calories per day he/she would gain one
        pound in 35 days. Simple formula. Simple truth.

        If you add 100 calories per day of sugar to your diet, or apples
        or broccoli or corn syrup, your body will convert the extra fuel
        to fat. So, cookies, carrots, pretzels, or hummus? A calorie is
        a calorie, be it sugar or protein or carbohydrate or fat.

        During 1973, the average American ate 1 pound of fructose
        corn syrup, 70 pounds of sugar, and 10 pounds of cheese.
        That represents 1,448 calories for the corn syrup, 122,873
        calories for the sugar, and 18,276 calories for the cheese.

        In 2008, the average American will eat 43 pounds of fructose
        corn syrup, 46 pounds of sugar, and 32 pounds of cheese. That
        represents 62,205 calories in the corn syrup, 80,747 calories
        in the sugar, and 58,435 calories in the cheese.

        No obesity epidemic in 1973. Humongous obesity epidemic in 2007.

        In 1973, the average American consumed 124,221 calories
        from corn syrup and sugar. In 2007, that per capita consumption
        will increase by 18,724 calories. That translates into a weight
        gain of 5.35 pounds per year.

        In 1973, the average American consumed 18,276 calories from
        cheese. In 2007, that number will increase to 58,435 calories.
        That represents an additional 40,159 calories plus those
        additional growth hormones which instruct human cells to grow.
        That translates into a yearly weight gain of 11.47 pounds.

        It takes 3,500 calories to build make one pound of your body.
        If you want lose one pound, you must burn 3,500 calories.
        You could do so by playing ping pong for 12 hours, or making
        love for 93 hours, or working out in the gym until you
        melt into a puddle, or, you could eat less food than your
        body requires. That is the easiest way to lose weight.

        In their lack of wisdom, schools have removed soda machines
        from their halls and added milk machines. Cafeterias use
        less sugar and add more cheese to a child's diet.

        Let the truth be known. Soda is not the cause of obesity.
        Got cheese? Got obesity!

        Robert Cohen
        http://www.notmilk.com
      • cohensmilk1
        _____________________________________ Over the years that dad has been writing his daily Notmilk columns, I ve enjoyed each time that he mentioned me. Here s
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2010
          _____________________________________
          Over the years that dad has been writing his
          daily Notmilk columns, I've enjoyed each time
          that he mentioned me. Here's one example...
          - - - Jennifer Cohen
          _____________________________________

          Stop Blaming Obesity on Soda

          Today, they blame it on soda, so soda machines are
          removed from schools. One finds so many conflicts
          of interest with USDA employees holding seats of
          power. These decision makers have strong ties to
          the dairy industry, but similar relations with
          soda manufacturers are rare. See:

          <http://www.notmilk.com/usdatest.html >

          Today we demonstrate that although soda may be a part
          of the overall obesity problem seen over the past 30
          years, the major factor is increased cheese consumption.

          A few weeks ago, I drove Jennifer (age 19) back to
          her college campus and helped carry her refrigerator
          and other assorted freight up to my daughter's second
          floor dormitory room. I could not help but be stunned
          while driving around her campus by the number of obese
          young men and women who live on campus. It was shocking.
          I attended that same college in 1970, and memories,
          confirmed by photographs, reveal no such overweight
          students. What are we doing differently today. What
          changed from 1970 to 2004?

          After obtaining food data from the following website:

          <http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/03statab/health.pdf >

          The differences in soda and cheese consumption during the
          period of time from 1970 through 2000 were considered.
          Data were also obtained for 1970 soda and cheese consumption
          rates by performing a Google search.

          Here is what was discovered. In 1970, the per capita
          consumption of soda in America was 29.9 gallons. By 2000,
          that number had increased to 37.7 gallons.

          In 1970, the per capita consumption of cheese was 10
          pounds. By 2000, that number had increased to 29.8 pounds.
          (In 2004, the average American will consumer over 31 pounds
          of cheese.)

          Just one factor was considered. Calories. The human body
          does not care where it gets its fuel. Sugar, fat, protein,
          carbs...it's all fuel to be converted into energy. Extra
          fuel is stored as fat. So...in fairness to dairy, neither
          fat nor cholesterol content was considered. Just calories.

          One pound of American cheese contains 1,490 calories.
          One gallon of cola contains 1,592 calories.

          Here is what was found.

          In 1970, when I was in college and most people were slim,
          the average American each day consumed 130 calories from
          soda and 71 calories from cheese. Criticize what you may,
          but that proportion kept us relatively slim.

          By 2000, the average American was consuming daily 164
          calories from soda and 122 calories from cheese.

          What we must do, then, is determine the differences. That
          is the key to the obesity epidemic. The baseline (1970
          numbers) did not result in large numbers of overweight
          children as there are in 2004. That trend resulted from
          the increased consumption of one or both commodities.

          BOTTOM LINE

          From 1970 until 2000, the average American consumed
          an additional 34 calories each day from soda. From
          1970 until 2000, the average American consumed an
          additional 50 calories each day from cheese.

          In July of 2000, the Journal of the Archives of
          Disease in Childhood reported:

          "From 1965 to 1996, a considerable shift in the
          adolescent diet occurred...increases occurred in the
          consumption of higher fat potatoes and mixed dishes
          (pizza, macaroni cheese)...These trends, far greater
          than for US adults, may compromise health of the future
          US population."

          Since there are 365 days in a year, and 3,500 calories
          in a pound, I calculated that during the 4 years of
          high school, a teenager would gain 14 additional
          pounds from his or her soda consumption, and 21
          additional pounds from his or her increased cheese
          consumption.

          Oh, yes...one major difference between the two
          commodities that I have not yet considered in this
          column, but do so now. Soda does not contain growth
          hormones. Growth hormones instruct cells to grow.
          Combine the large amount of calories found in cheese
          with saturated animal fat and cholesterol, and an
          abundance of naturally occurring concentrated growth
          hormones, and the body does what it is instructed
          to do. Grow! So, place the blame where it rightfully
          belongs. Behold, the growth power of cheese.

          Robert Cohen
          http://www.notmilk.com
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.