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Lactose Intolerance

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  • Robert Cohen
    In April of 1999, the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology (volume 28:3) reported: Introduction of a lactose-free dietary regime relieves symptoms in most
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 1, 2003
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      In April of 1999, the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
      (volume 28:3) reported:

      "Introduction of a lactose-free dietary regime relieves
      symptoms in most patients...who remain largely unaware
      of the relationship between food intake and symptoms."

      Fifty million Americans experience intestinal discomfort
      after consuming milk, cheese, or ice cream (Postgraduate
      Medicine, 1994;95). Symptoms include stomach pain, gas,
      and diarrhea.

      Lactose, a milk sugar, is made up of two other sugars,
      glucose and galactose. Galactose has been identified
      as a causative factor in heart disease, cataracts, and
      glaucoma. Most adults "lack" the enzyme, lactase, to
      break down lactose. Instead, lactose is broken down
      by bacteria in the lower intestines. Their own body
      wastes combine with those sugars to ferment into
      toxins causing bloating and cramps.

      Once a correct diagnosis is established, there is a
      simple cure: Notmilk!

      Robert Cohen
      http://www.notmilk.com
    • Robert Cohen
      Lactose Intolerance An estimated 50 million Americans experience intestinal discomfort after consuming dairy products. Symptoms include bloating, stomach
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 12, 2005
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        Lactose Intolerance

        "An estimated 50 million Americans experience intestinal
        discomfort after consuming dairy products. Symptoms include
        bloating, stomach pain, cramps, gas, or diarrhea. Lactose
        intolerance is widespread...Lactose maldigestion may coexist
        in adults with irritable bowel syndrome and in children with
        recurrent abdominal pain. Management consists primarily
        of dietary changes."

        Postgraduate Medicine, 1998 Sep, 104:3

        "Overall, about 75 percent of the world's population,
        including 25 percent of those in the U.S., lose their
        lactase enzymes after weaning."

        Journal of the American Dietetic Assoc. 1996; 96

        "Lactose malabsorption and lactase deficiency are
        chronic organic pathologic conditions characterized
        by abdominal pain and distention, flatulence, and the
        passage of loose, watery stools. Once correct diagnosis
        is established, introduction of a lactose-free dietary
        regime relieves symptoms in most patients...who remain
        largely unaware of the relationship between food intake
        and symptoms."

        Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 1999 Apr, 28:3

        Robert Cohen
        http://www.notmilk.com
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