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[NTB] EBCDIC

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  • Dennis Cummins
    Can someone please tell me what this is, EBCDIC and please in a language I might be able to understand, like with a lot of goo goo s and ga ga s. Dennis ...
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 26, 1999
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      Can someone please tell me what this is, EBCDIC and please in a language I
      might be able to understand, like with a lot of goo goo's and ga ga's.<G>

      Dennis


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    • Ron Cadby
      ... Well, I ll embarrass myself. Without looking it up, I think the correct meaning is Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (or something like
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 26, 1999
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        On Fri, 26 Mar 1999 17:31:03 -0600, you wrote:

        >Can someone please tell me what this is, EBCDIC and please in a language I
        >might be able to understand, like with a lot of goo goo's and ga ga's.<G>
        >
        Well, I'll embarrass myself. Without looking it up, I think the
        correct meaning is Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code
        (or something like that). It came about when computers grew from
        less bits per character to 8 (hexadecimal) to Extend the bit
        combinations to allow 4 times as many characters/symbols.

        I started when characters were only 6 bits which was called Octal
        because each 3 bits could count from 0 to 7 (8 combinations). It
        took 2 Octal digits to make a character/symbol. But, there just
        wasn't enough combinations (only 64), so they went to 2
        Hexadecimal digits which allowed 256 combinations.

        RCA (where I first worked with computers) tried introducing
        decimal machines (bi-quinary) where the least significant 3 bit
        digit (the one on the right) only counted from 0-4 and the most
        significant 1 bit digit went from 0-1 thus giving you ten
        combinations, but it meant throwing away perfectly good bit
        combinations.

        Anyway, now we count from 0-F with two 4 bit hexadecimal digits
        and the codes/characters are called EBCDIC which has been
        accepted for a few generations as perfectly logical and normal.

        Clear? There will be a test in the morning.......Ron
        --

        Best to all, RonCadby mailto:rcadby@... http://www.check.com

        "A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose
        both, and deserve neither." - Thomas Jefferson

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      • Dennis Cummins
        HI Ron, ... .........I am leaving on the train tonight so I will not be available for any test.:-)))) Thanks very much! Dennis ... eGroup home:
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 26, 1999
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          HI Ron,


          On 27 Mar 99, 1:06 Ron Cadby wrote:

          > Anyway, now we count from 0-F with two 4 bit hexadecimal digits
          > and the codes/characters are called EBCDIC which has been
          > accepted for a few generations as perfectly logical and normal.
          >
          > Clear? There will be a test in the morning.......Ron

          <LOL>.........I am leaving on the train tonight so I will not be available
          for any test.:-))))

          Thanks very much!

          Dennis


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