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line spacing

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  • killeenjd
    Apologies if this feature already exists and I just haven t found it yet... One feature I d like to see added to NoteTab Pro is line spacing (for display
    Message 1 of 9 , May 22 6:40 PM
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      Apologies if this feature already exists and I just haven't found it yet...

      One feature I'd like to see added to NoteTab Pro is line spacing (for display purposes rather than printing). I find it much easier on the eye to have additional spacing between lines when I'm writing a long report. Obviously this would have no impact on the text file being edited, it would purely be a display feature. This is the only feature I really miss from my last text editor (EmEditor), which allowed you to vary line and character spacing.

      Ideally, I'd also like to see the option to vary the top, bottom, left and right margins in the editor frame, so that I could add have a generous margin of white space around the text. I understand this will be of little interest to people who use NoteTab for coding, but for those of us who use NoteTab for first drafts of long documents, I imagine these would be welcome additions to the program.
    • John Shotsky
      I don t mean to be rude, but why don t you use the (free) Open Office or another word processor for your first drafts? Those features are exactly why word
      Message 2 of 9 , May 23 6:28 AM
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        I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or another word processor for your first drafts?
        Those features are exactly why word processors exist. Open Office 3.x is nearly as powerful as Word, maybe more so.and
        you can write in text, use regex, etc.

        I can't think of a single reason to use a text editor in place of a word processor for reports.

        And, Killeenjd, it is recommended that folks sign their messages in these groups, or any such email groups.

        John

        From: notetab@yahoogroups.com [mailto:notetab@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of killeenjd
        Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 18:40
        To: notetab@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [NTB] line spacing





        Apologies if this feature already exists and I just haven't found it yet...

        One feature I'd like to see added to NoteTab Pro is line spacing (for display purposes rather than printing). I find it
        much easier on the eye to have additional spacing between lines when I'm writing a long report. Obviously this would
        have no impact on the text file being edited, it would purely be a display feature. This is the only feature I really
        miss from my last text editor (EmEditor), which allowed you to vary line and character spacing.

        Ideally, I'd also like to see the option to vary the top, bottom, left and right margins in the editor frame, so that I
        could add have a generous margin of white space around the text. I understand this will be of little interest to people
        who use NoteTab for coding, but for those of us who use NoteTab for first drafts of long documents, I imagine these
        would be welcome additions to the program.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • killeenjd
        ... Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have always done most of my
        Message 3 of 9 , May 23 7:13 AM
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          --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@...> wrote:
          >
          > I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or another word processor for your first drafts?

          Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have always done most of my writing in plain text, only exporting material to a word processor to add formatting (if needed). I think this is just common sense, and I'm not the only writer to take this approach.

          Your logical follow-up question might be "well, why not use a word processor and save as ".txt" until the presentational stage?" I love the elegance, simplicity and speed of a good text editor. The outline feature of NoteTab, for example, is great for structuring longer pieces, and preferable for me to any word processor's outline function (although I do wish NoteTab retained its cursor position within each section of the outline as you move between them).

          Using NoteTab, I can even use clips to script certain elements of presentation. And writing a NoteTab clip is generally a lot easier than scripting a Word macro.

          Shorter answer to your question: I prefer a good text editor -- they're generally quicker to work with. Maybe it's just habit.

          John
        • Barbara Weitbrecht
          I m glad I m not the only one who prefers a text editor for creative writing. My fiction-writing tools of choice are NoteTab on Windows and BBEdit on the Mac.
          Message 4 of 9 , May 26 8:59 AM
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            I'm glad I'm not the only one who prefers a text editor for creative
            writing. My fiction-writing tools of choice are NoteTab on Windows and
            BBEdit on the Mac. Back when I was working on an IBM mainframe, I
            wrote fiction in XEDIT. (I know -- my nerd credentials are showing.)

            On Sat, May 23, 2009 at 10:13 AM, killeenjd <jdk5093@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or
            >> another word processor for your first drafts?
            >
            > Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and
            > non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have always done
            > most of my writing in plain text, only exporting material to a word
            > processor to add formatting (if needed). I think this is just common sense,
            > and I'm not the only writer to take this approach.
            >
            > Your logical follow-up question might be "well, why not use a word processor
            > and save as ".txt" until the presentational stage?" I love the elegance,
            > simplicity and speed of a good text editor. The outline feature of NoteTab,
            > for example, is great for structuring longer pieces, and preferable for me
            > to any word processor's outline function (although I do wish NoteTab
            > retained its cursor position within each section of the outline as you move
            > between them).
            >
            > Using NoteTab, I can even use clips to script certain elements of
            > presentation. And writing a NoteTab clip is generally a lot easier than
            > scripting a Word macro.
            >
            > Shorter answer to your question: I prefer a good text editor -- they're
            > generally quicker to work with. Maybe it's just habit.
            >
            > John

            --
            Barbara Weitbrecht
            sealwyf@...
            http://www.sealwyf.com
          • Scott Fordin
            I also like using a text editor for creative writing. That said, I do also enjoy using yWriter from spacejock.com and Celtx from celtx.com; the former for
            Message 5 of 9 , May 27 5:06 PM
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              I also like using a text editor for creative writing. That said, I do
              also enjoy using yWriter from spacejock.com and Celtx from celtx.com;
              the former for fiction, the latter for scripts. Both are free, and this
              is the last thing I'll say about them here because this is, after all,
              a Notetab list?

              Scott

              Barbara Weitbrecht wrote:
              >
              > I'm glad I'm not the only one who prefers a text editor for creative
              > writing. My fiction-writing tools of choice are NoteTab on Windows and
              > BBEdit on the Mac. Back when I was working on an IBM mainframe, I
              > wrote fiction in XEDIT. (I know -- my nerd credentials are showing.)
              >
              > On Sat, May 23, 2009 at 10:13 AM, killeenjd <jdk5093@...
              > <mailto:jdk5093%40gmail.com>> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com <mailto:notetab%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@...> wrote:
              > >>
              > >> I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or
              > >> another word processor for your first drafts?
              > >
              > > Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and
              > > non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have
              > always done
              > > most of my writing in plain text, only exporting material to a word
              > > processor to add formatting (if needed). I think this is just common
              > sense,
              > > and I'm not the only writer to take this approach.
              > >
              > > Your logical follow-up question might be "well, why not use a word
              > processor
              > > and save as ".txt" until the presentational stage?" I love the elegance,
              > > simplicity and speed of a good text editor. The outline feature of
              > NoteTab,
              > > for example, is great for structuring longer pieces, and preferable
              > for me
              > > to any word processor's outline function (although I do wish NoteTab
              > > retained its cursor position within each section of the outline as
              > you move
              > > between them).
              > >
              > > Using NoteTab, I can even use clips to script certain elements of
              > > presentation. And writing a NoteTab clip is generally a lot easier than
              > > scripting a Word macro.
              > >
              > > Shorter answer to your question: I prefer a good text editor -- they're
              > > generally quicker to work with. Maybe it's just habit.
              > >
              > > John
              >
              > --
              > Barbara Weitbrecht
              > sealwyf@... <mailto:sealwyf%40gmail.com>
              > http://www.sealwyf.com <http://www.sealwyf.com>
              >
              >
            • Rod Dav4is
              Ahh! Fond memory: XEDIT! The best editor ever! I particularly liked the /hide/ lines based on some criteria, then edit the rest with change all. A most
              Message 6 of 9 , May 30 3:13 AM
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                Ahh! Fond memory: XEDIT! The best editor ever!
                I particularly liked the /hide/ lines based on some criteria, then edit
                the rest with change all. A most powerful feature!
                -R.


                Barbara Weitbrecht wrote:
                > I'm glad I'm not the only one who prefers a text editor for creative
                > writing. My fiction-writing tools of choice are NoteTab on Windows and
                > BBEdit on the Mac. Back when I was working on an IBM mainframe, I
                > wrote fiction in XEDIT. (I know -- my nerd credentials are showing.)
                >
                > On Sat, May 23, 2009 at 10:13 AM, killeenjd <jdk5093@...> wrote:
                >
                >> --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@...> wrote:
                >>
                >>> I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or
                >>> another word processor for your first drafts?
                >>>
                >> Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and
                >> non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have always done
                >> most of my writing in plain text, only exporting material to a word
                >> processor to add formatting (if needed). I think this is just common sense,
                >> and I'm not the only writer to take this approach.
                >>
                >> Your logical follow-up question might be "well, why not use a word processor
                >> and save as ".txt" until the presentational stage?" I love the elegance,
                >> simplicity and speed of a good text editor. The outline feature of NoteTab,
                >> for example, is great for structuring longer pieces, and preferable for me
                >> to any word processor's outline function (although I do wish NoteTab
                >> retained its cursor position within each section of the outline as you move
                >> between them).
                >>
                >> Using NoteTab, I can even use clips to script certain elements of
                >> presentation. And writing a NoteTab clip is generally a lot easier than
                >> scripting a Word macro.
                >>
                >> Shorter answer to your question: I prefer a good text editor -- they're
                >> generally quicker to work with. Maybe it's just habit.
                >>
                >> John
                >>
                >
                >

                --
                Regards, Rod Dav4is / P.O. Box 118 / Hyde Park, NY 12538 / USA
                Genealogy, et Cetera: http://freepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dav4is/
                536 ancestral & collateral families, mostly 17°-19° century
                New England & European roots. Total population: 134,200+
                Annex: http://www.gencircles.com/users/dav4is/
                email: DAV4IS@...
                A people which takes no pride in the achievements of remote
                ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered by
                remote descendants.
                -Thomas Babington Macaulay
              • Martin Basiszta
                Ah, you take me back to the days when I used to love Edlin . Life was simpler and yet faster then... Marty
                Message 7 of 9 , May 31 11:03 AM
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                  Ah, you take me back to the days when I used to love "Edlin". Life was simpler and yet faster then...

                  Marty

                  --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, Rod Dav4is <dav4is@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Ahh! Fond memory: XEDIT! The best editor ever!
                  > I particularly liked the /hide/ lines based on some criteria, then edit
                  > the rest with change all. A most powerful feature!
                  > -R.
                  >
                  >
                  > Barbara Weitbrecht wrote:
                  > > I'm glad I'm not the only one who prefers a text editor for creative
                  > > writing. My fiction-writing tools of choice are NoteTab on Windows and
                  > > BBEdit on the Mac. Back when I was working on an IBM mainframe, I
                  > > wrote fiction in XEDIT. (I know -- my nerd credentials are showing.)
                  > >
                  > > On Sat, May 23, 2009 at 10:13 AM, killeenjd <jdk5093@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >> --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@> wrote:
                  > >>
                  > >>> I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you use the (free) Open Office or
                  > >>> another word processor for your first drafts?
                  > >>>
                  > >> Fair question. I have always tried to keep things as simple (and
                  > >> non-proprietary) as possible. In applying that principle, I have always done
                  > >> most of my writing in plain text, only exporting material to a word
                  > >> processor to add formatting (if needed). I think this is just common sense,
                  > >> and I'm not the only writer to take this approach.
                  > >>
                  > >> Your logical follow-up question might be "well, why not use a word processor
                  > >> and save as ".txt" until the presentational stage?" I love the elegance,
                  > >> simplicity and speed of a good text editor. The outline feature of NoteTab,
                  > >> for example, is great for structuring longer pieces, and preferable for me
                  > >> to any word processor's outline function (although I do wish NoteTab
                  > >> retained its cursor position within each section of the outline as you move
                  > >> between them).
                  > >>
                  > >> Using NoteTab, I can even use clips to script certain elements of
                  > >> presentation. And writing a NoteTab clip is generally a lot easier than
                  > >> scripting a Word macro.
                  > >>
                  > >> Shorter answer to your question: I prefer a good text editor -- they're
                  > >> generally quicker to work with. Maybe it's just habit.
                  > >>
                  > >> John
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Regards, Rod Dav4is / P.O. Box 118 / Hyde Park, NY 12538 / USA
                  > Genealogy, et Cetera: http://freepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dav4is/
                  > 536 ancestral & collateral families, mostly 17°-19° century
                  > New England & European roots. Total population: 134,200+
                  > Annex: http://www.gencircles.com/users/dav4is/
                  > email: DAV4IS@...
                  > A people which takes no pride in the achievements of remote
                  > ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered by
                  > remote descendants.
                  > -Thomas Babington Macaulay
                  >
                • Sheri
                  ... Its still there, in the command environment! Never much cared for edlin, but PE2 was dandy.
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 31 1:35 PM
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                    --- In notetab@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Basiszta" <mbasiszta@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ah, you take me back to the days when I used to love "Edlin".
                    > Life was simpler and yet faster then...

                    Its still there, in the command environment!

                    Never much cared for edlin, but PE2 was dandy.
                  • Eric Fookes
                    This list should be used for discussing NoteTab. It s fine to also mention third-party products and resources that enhance the NoteTab experience. To discuss
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 1, 2009
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                      This list should be used for discussing NoteTab. It's fine to also
                      mention third-party products and resources that enhance the NoteTab
                      experience. To discuss any other kind of product, please do so on the
                      off topic list. Thank you.

                      --
                      Regards,

                      Eric Fookes
                      http://www.fookes.com/
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