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taskbar

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  • Adrian/ Rosemary Worsfold
    I don t understand this about not putting note tab in the system tray. I have Windows 95 with the single click that came via IE5.5. I dropped a Notetab
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 28, 2001
      I don't understand this about not putting note tab in the system tray. I have Windows 95 with the
      single click that came via IE5.5. I dropped a Notetab shortcut on to the area next to the start button,
      as I did with Yeah Write, My Documents, My Pictures and My Uploads, and I dropped on
      connections to my ISP, and further over I dropped the C folder on to the taskbar so that I have
      access right across the folders of the hard drive in cascading menus just as with using the start
      button. Single clicks all round.

      Adrian Worsfold

      http://www.pluralist.co.uk
    • Jim Hall
      Adrian, ... The area you are referring to came standard in Win98 and all after and is called the Quick Launch Bar . I use it extensively in the same manner
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 28, 2001
        Adrian,

        At 09:37 PM 11/28/01 +0000, you wrote:
        >I don't understand this about not putting note tab in the system tray. I
        >have Windows 95 with the
        >single click that came via IE5.5. I dropped a Notetab shortcut on to the
        >area next to the start button,
        >as I did with Yeah Write, My Documents, My Pictures and My Uploads, and I
        >dropped on
        >connections to my ISP, and further over I dropped the C folder on to the
        >taskbar so that I have
        >access right across the folders of the hard drive in cascading menus just
        >as with using the start
        >button. Single clicks all round.


        The area you are referring to came standard in Win98 and all after and is
        called the "Quick Launch Bar".

        I use it extensively in the same manner you are.

        The "System Tray" is the similar area to the far right where your clock is,
        and in general, files which are opened at startup in a minimized form have
        their icons placed here. Whether they are single or double clicked, right
        or left mouse button active, depends on the individual application.

        HTH

        Regards,

        Jim
      • Charles
        ... is, ... Yep. The Quick Launch Bar is actually just one use of Toolbars in general. You can stick additional toolbars down there on the whole Taskbar, or
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 28, 2001
          > The area you are referring to came standard in Win98 and all after and is
          > called the "Quick Launch Bar".
          >
          > I use it extensively in the same manner you are.
          >
          > The "System Tray" is the similar area to the far right where your clock
          is,
          > and in general, files which are opened at startup in a minimized form have
          > their icons placed here. Whether they are single or double clicked, right
          > or left mouse button active, depends on the individual application.
          Yep. The Quick Launch Bar is actually just one use of Toolbars in
          general. You can stick additional toolbars down there on the whole Taskbar,
          or even stick them on the sides and top of the screen, auto-hide and
          always-display.
          Sometimes what will happen is a program has a 'minimize to system tray'
          option, which will put a small icon somewhere near the clock - in the system
          tray. (If you were to hit ctrl-alt-del, one of the programs listed would be
          'systray' - that's what it is.) Sometimes, you can click on that icon just
          once, and it will activate the program. Then, the next program over moves
          to fill in that space. If you double-click too slowly, that new program
          will be executed as well. It's annoying, not having consistent behavior.
          Trust me - as someone who's used other Linux-style operating systems, in
          text and graphical modes, incosistent behavior between programs and
          operating systems are rampant.
          A friend of my mother's just recently got a used computer from a family
          member running Windows 95. She's never once in her life used a desktop
          model, so everything's foreign to her - I'm having to explain Start Button,
          Start Menu, Desktop, Wallpaper, etc. The terminology can get overwhelming
          and confusing, especially when it's rarely discussed, such as the system
          tray.
          Okay, non-NT bit ended. Hope I helped, and didn't harm.

          --Charles
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