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Adirondack Meeting - Randy Oliver

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  • kevvans
    Bob, Adele and I made the trek to Albany this past week and took in the presentations from Randy Oliver and Maryann Frazier. Randy was all that one would hope.
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 2 2:22 PM
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      Bob, Adele and I made the trek to Albany this past week and took in the presentations from Randy Oliver and Maryann Frazier.

      Randy was all that one would hope. It bordered on overload, all of the ground covered and information disseminated. He's energetic, insightful, and seemed very current and on top of what is going on in some many respects for beekeeping.

      His primary themes were control the mites, mind nutrition and that Nosema Ceranae could be lurking as a growing problem for management of bees. He provided practial and scientific explanations of some many points that it was a lot to absorb. If he repeats any of his approach for us in May, this will be a DO NOT MISS meeting.

      Maryann did a great job too. She spoke of the different pesticides, herbicides, miticides, etc. in the hive and the impacts to the colony.

      Beyond those findings another area she covered was the 'inert' ingredients and synergistics added to proprietary formulations that could be doing harm in the same way as the advertised agent (aka Main Ingredient) in a formulation. She also did a session on beekeeping in Africa and findings/learnings form there.

      All in all it was a fruitful day. The only bad part was that Bob still didn't win anything in the auction. I guess he'll have to take solace that we finagled a conversation with Michael Palmer for a bit of time. THAT was really worth the price of admission.
    • klossr00
      We also found out that the SABA had between 25-30 volunteers to help organize and run the program. NWNJBA is currently trying to pull this off with only a
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3 6:38 AM
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        We also found out that the SABA had between 25-30 volunteers to help organize and run the program. NWNJBA is currently trying to pull this off with only a handful of (the same) people. Please, if you are able to help, email me or Kevin. There is still lots to do to make this successful. I am currently organizing demonstrations and vendor tables for the two hour lunch period. I could use a couple of more vendors and I'm looking for NWNJBA volunteers to host demonstrations on topics such as swarm control, meade making, drone brood culling, sugar dusting, observation hive building or any other topic that you think beekeepers would be interested in. So, please, if you have something to offer or would just like to be "a pair of hands" to help with set-up and take-down, please email me or Kevin. Thanks, Bob Kloss
        --- In northwestnewjerseybeekeepers@yahoogroups.com, "kevvans" <inglins@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bob, Adele and I made the trek to Albany this past week and took in the presentations from Randy Oliver and Maryann Frazier.
        >
        > Randy was all that one would hope. It bordered on overload, all of the ground covered and information disseminated. He's energetic, insightful, and seemed very current and on top of what is going on in some many respects for beekeeping.
        >
        > His primary themes were control the mites, mind nutrition and that Nosema Ceranae could be lurking as a growing problem for management of bees. He provided practial and scientific explanations of some many points that it was a lot to absorb. If he repeats any of his approach for us in May, this will be a DO NOT MISS meeting.
        >
        > Maryann did a great job too. She spoke of the different pesticides, herbicides, miticides, etc. in the hive and the impacts to the colony.
        >
        > Beyond those findings another area she covered was the 'inert' ingredients and synergistics added to proprietary formulations that could be doing harm in the same way as the advertised agent (aka Main Ingredient) in a formulation. She also did a session on beekeeping in Africa and findings/learnings form there.
        >
        > All in all it was a fruitful day. The only bad part was that Bob still didn't win anything in the auction. I guess he'll have to take solace that we finagled a conversation with Michael Palmer for a bit of time. THAT was really worth the price of admission.
        >
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