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Re: [norse_course] Re: Njal 101end/begin 102 (the poems)

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  • Patricia Wilson
    Thanks a whole Bundle LN OMG !! that is SO cryptic - Thanks very much for that - it has taken some of the Crypt out of the poetry - when I get this through
    Message 1 of 7 , May 8 11:40 PM
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      Thanks a whole Bundle LN
      OMG !!  that is SO cryptic - Thanks very much for that - it has taken some of the "Crypt" out of the poetry - when I get this through the system and into my email program  I want to copy this for future use I have several pages of things like this
      I am writing this on line in Google - a process which I find to be awkward and unreliable - but Google and Incredimail are at war in my PC - hope it clears later
      Kveðja
      Patricia

      On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 2:35 AM, llama_nom <600cell@...> wrote:

      Ryðfjónar gekk reynir
      randa suðr á landi
      beðs í bœnar smiðju
      Baldrs sigtólum halda.

      "The Baldr of the bed of rust-hate (i.e. god of bed of whetstone = god
      of sword = warrior) went south, the tester/rowan of shields (i.e.
      warrior), to direct victory-tools (i.e. his weapons) into the smithy
      of prayer (i.e. breast [of his enemy])."

      beðr ryð-fjónar – bed of rust-hate = bed of whetstone = sword (where
      the whetstone lies when it's being used).

      bœnar smiðja – smithy of prayer = breast (conceived of as the place
      where prayers and wishes are formed).

      halda – to hold (with a dative object indicating what is held), here
      more specifically "to aim, move, direct" (see Lex. Poet. 8: rette,
      bevæge, styre).

      reynir randa – either "tester of shields" or "rowan tree of shields",
      both of which = warrior. No real way to decide between them, as they
      each follow a conventional pattern of making kennings and the meaning
      of the whole kenning would be exactly the same either way.

      sig-tól, n.pl. – victory-tools = weapons.

      suðr á landi – south, southwards.

      Siðreynir lét síðan
      snjallr morðhamar gjalla
      hauðrs í hattar steðja
      hjaldrs Vetrliða skaldi.

      "The bold custom-tester/rowan of battle (i.e. the tester/rowan of the
      custom/practice of battle = warrior) made [his] murder-hammer (i.e.
      his sword) resound, set [it] in the land of the hood (i.e. head) of
      the poet Vetrliði."

      gjalla – shriek, resound.

      hauðr, n. - land, earth.
      höttr, m. - hood (gen. hattar)
      hauðr hattar – land of hood = head.

      morð-hamarr – murder-hammer = sword (it's accusative, hamar, in the
      verse, although this isn't apparent from the modern spelling where
      nominative has become `hamar' too).

      sið-reynir hjaldrs – custom-tester/rowan of battle = tester/rowan of
      the custom/practice of battle = warrior.

      snjallr – bold (notice that it's nominative in the verse, agreeing
      with sið-reynir).

      steðja – to place, set.


      * SECOND POEM *

      Yggs bjálfa mun ek Úlfi
      Endils um boð senda,
      mér er við stála stýri
      stugglaust, syni Ugga,

      "I'll send instructions from the Odin of the pelt of Endill (i.e. god
      of armour = warrior) to Úlfr, Uggi's son...  (I'm not averse to the
      wielder of swords.)" (In other words: I send this message to my
      friend, Úlfr...)

      bjálfi Endils – pelt of Endill = armour. Endill is one of many
      interchangeable "sea-kings" (legendary pirate leaders) whose names
      form the basis of kennings for anything related to war or the sea.

      boð – message, order, instructions.

      Yggr bjálfa Endils – Odin of armour = warrior. I think he's referring
      to himself here; and, unless I'm mistaken, the genitive is being used
      in an ablative sense to mean "from".

      stál, n. – steel, sword.

      stýrir stála – steerer/director of swords = warrior.

      stugglauss – `mér er stugglaust við e-n' "I am without aversion
      towards, I am friendly towards".

      um - here, as often in verse, a meaningless filler word, used to help
      out the metre (`of' can be used in the same way).

      at gnýskúta Geitis
      goðvarg fyrir argan,
      þann er við rögn um regnir,
      reki hann en ek annan.

      ...(instructions) that he drive the cowardly transgressor against the
      gods, he who blasphemes against the divine powers (gods), over the
      giant's din-cave (i.e. force him over a cliff), and I [will drive] the
      other [over too].

      argr – cowardly, effeminate.
      Geitir – name of a giant.

      gný-skúti – "din-cave, cave of roaring storms"; cliffs are
      traditionally characterised as the homes of giants; Lex. Poet.
      buldrende klipehule, hule med de omgivende kipper "roaring cliff-cave,
      cave with the surrounding cliffs"; according to Lex. Poet. `reka fyr
      gnýskúta Geitis' synes ar være ensbetydande med "seems to be
      synonymous with" `reka fyr björg' "drive over a cliff".  Likewise, Jón
      Hnefill Aðalsteinsson paraphrases `fyrir gnýskúta Geitis' = `fyrir
      hamra' "over cliffs" (Fórnarblót í fornum sið [
      http://www2.hi.is/Apps/WebObjects/HI.woa/1/swdocument/1007072/J%C3%B3n+Hnefill_+F%C3%B3rnarbl%C3%B3t+.pdf?wosid=false
      ]).  He quotes Ólafur Lárusson: "Örlögin sem Þorvaldur ætlaði
      Þangbrandi og Guðleifi geta verið hvorttveggja í senn, refsing og
      blót, því dauðarefsing var blót." (The fate which Þorvaldr intended
      for Þangbrandr and Guðleifr may have been simultaneously punishment
      and offering, since the death penalty was [also] and offering).

      goð-vargr – wolf of the gods, enemy of the gods, transgressor against
      the gods.

      regnir – some versions have `rignir' here; Lex Poet. synes at betyde
      `strides' (seems to mean "fights, struggles, strives [against]"); CV
      `rigna við rögn' "to blaspheme against the gods".  Lex. Poet. gives
      this one-off verb `rigna' a separate entry from `rigna' "to rain",
      while CV includes it in the entry for `rigna' "to rain".

      rögn, n.pl. – powers, gods.


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    • llama_nom
      ... I just realised: steðja isn t the verb meaning to place , but the masculine noun steði anvil , making a three-part kenning: steði hauðrs hattar
      Message 2 of 7 , May 9 10:59 AM
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        --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom" <600cell@...> wrote:
        >
        > Siðreynir lét síðan
        > snjallr morðhamar gjalla
        > hauðrs í hattar steðja
        > hjaldrs Vetrliða skaldi.
        >
        > "The bold custom-tester/rowan of battle (i.e. the tester/rowan of the
        > custom/practice of battle = warrior) made [his] murder-hammer (i.e.
        > his sword) resound, set [it] in the land of the hood (i.e. head) of
        > the poet Vetrliði."

        I just realised: 'steðja' isn't the verb meaning "to place", but the
        masculine noun 'steði' "anvil", making a three-part kenning:

        'steði hauðrs hattar'
        "anvil of land of hood"

        http://www.septentrionalia.net/lex/index2.php?book=e&page=535&ext=png

        'hauðr hattar' "land of hood" would itself be an adequate kenning for
        head, but the anvil idea goes nicely with 'morðhamar'. Interpreting
        'steðja' as a verb doesn't work because 'hauðrs' "of land" is
        genitive, so there needs some further noun to complete the kenning.
        Sorry about that!

        Siðreynir lét síðan
        snjallr morðhamar gjalla
        hauðrs í hattar steðja
        hjaldrs Vetrliða skaldi.

        The bold rowan/tester of the practice of battle (i.e. warrior) then
        made his murder-hammer resound on the poet Vetrliði's anvil of the
        land of the hood (i.e. head).
      • Patricia Wilson
        Thanks LN thanks a bundle for the comments on the poems - I see that I got some bits right - sure small amounts - but some - a step in the right direction But
        Message 3 of 7 , May 9 11:17 AM
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          Thanks LN thanks a bundle for the comments on the poems - I see that I got some bits right - sure small amounts - but some - a step in the right direction
          But I shall never be a Bard Skald or whatever  - is there a difference
          Patricia

          On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 6:59 PM, llama_nom <600cell@...> wrote:
          --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom" <600cell@...> wrote:
          >
          > Siðreynir lét síðan
          > snjallr morðhamar gjalla
          > hauðrs í hattar steðja
          > hjaldrs Vetrliða skaldi.
          >
          > "The bold custom-tester/rowan of battle (i.e. the tester/rowan of the
          > custom/practice of battle = warrior) made [his] murder-hammer (i.e.
          > his sword) resound, set [it] in the land of the hood (i.e. head) of
          > the poet Vetrliði."

          I just realised: 'steðja' isn't the verb meaning "to place", but the
          masculine noun 'steði' "anvil", making a three-part kenning:

          'steði hauðrs hattar'
          "anvil of land of hood"

          http://www.septentrionalia.net/lex/index2.php?book=e&page=535&ext=png

          'hauðr hattar' "land of hood" would itself be an adequate kenning for
          head, but the anvil idea goes nicely with 'morðhamar'.  Interpreting
          'steðja' as a verb doesn't work because 'hauðrs' "of land" is
          genitive, so there needs some further noun to complete the kenning.
          Sorry about that!

          Siðreynir lét síðan
          snjallr morðhamar gjalla
          hauðrs í hattar steðja
          hjaldrs Vetrliða skaldi.

          The bold rowan/tester of the practice of battle (i.e. warrior) then
          made his murder-hammer resound on the poet Vetrliði's anvil of the
          land of the hood (i.e. head).


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