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Re: [norse_course] fell

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  • Patricia
    I have a dictionary in my PC that says Fell would be Scot. and N.England dialect for hill or moor, but also there is in Legend - Scottish Legend - a place of
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 30, 2006
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      I have a dictionary in my PC that says Fell would be Scot. and N.England  dialect for hill or moor, but also there is in Legend - Scottish Legend - a place of a sort of Spiritual Purgatory - called the
      "Whinny Muir" or thorny moor  where you soul goes to be proven if you done well or ill in life.
      And let us not forget "Killarney's Lakes and Fells" surely they too are legendary.
      I believe we would have to go both North and East of my county - Cheshire - to hear this word used unless we have no fells to speak of and therefore do not use the word.
      Perhaps it is but lately consigned to poetry - we could revive it
      Kveðja
      Patricia
       
       
      Verses regarding the "Whinny Muir" for those interested.
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 12:05 AM
      Subject: [norse_course] fell

      Fell is moorland, see "mýrlendi" "fjall or fjöll" we name Mountains.
      But Icelandic "Fell [FeDL]" are Rocky Hills or smaller than
      mountains: "fjöll".

      Hi Blanc,
      I finally got a chance to look up fell in English.  Gordon had translated
      fjall to English as fell.  In my big English dictionary it says  a fell is a
      moorland or barren or rocky hillside.

      In American English, one rarely encounters the word moorland, but in the
      English of Great Britain, there seem to be very many words for different
      sorts of moorlands.
      Grace
      Fred and Grace Hatton
      Hawley Pa

    • Blanc Voden
      Hi there Patricia, Thanks for the Link. Whinny Muir Some poetry? mu ir noun feminine genitive mar a; pl. mar ann an, sea, ocean. Whinny as neigh. The
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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        Hi there Patricia,

        Thanks for the Link. "Whinny Muir"

        Some poetry?

        mu'ir
        noun feminine genitive mar'a; pl. mar'ann'an, sea, ocean.
        Whinny as neigh.

        The Icelandic "Bards" raconte that "Mar(r)" to "Mars" more
        are "Mar'ir" names Horse (male gender).

        But Male noun "Mar" to "Mar'ar" names sea ocean.

        "Mer(i)" to "Mer'ar" more females are "Mer'ar" also or "Hryss'ur"
        and match Horses (of male gender).

        See also female "MarTröð" nightmar(e)

        Blue, black "far" spot we name "mar'ið" (neutral): the bruise.

        [Berr'y'a>] "Berja" is to strike or glance(strike at an angle?)
        Proverb: "Berja með augum"
        [Merr'y'a>]"Merja" is action of pressing: leaves at least first
        bruises: "MarBletti"

        "Þú merð mig(h)": You bruise me.
        "Íeg(h) mer þig(h)": I bruise you.

        "Hneggjar Mar"

        Se also "el" in "fela" to hide and edd in Feddll>Fell.
        fed(d) that is manna [gentive of Menn.

        FaDL>"Fall" is also corpse of butchered animal. Refering to what
        falls, I reckon.


        Thanks again

        Uoden

        --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia"
        <originalpatricia@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a dictionary in my PC that says Fell would be Scot. and
        N.England dialect for hill or moor, but also there is in Legend -
        Scottish Legend - a place of a sort of Spiritual Purgatory - called
        the
        > "Whinny Muir" or thorny moor where you soul goes to be proven if
        you done well or ill in life.
        > And let us not forget "Killarney's Lakes and Fells" surely they
        too are legendary.
        > I believe we would have to go both North and East of my county -
        Cheshire - to hear this word used unless we have no fells to speak
        of and therefore do not use the word.
        > Perhaps it is but lately consigned to poetry - we could revive it
        > Kveðja
        > Patricia
        >
        > http://www.scotscommunity.com/BOOKS/POETRY/A%20Lyke-Wake%
        20Dirge.htm
        >
        > Verses regarding the "Whinny Muir" for those interested.
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Fred and Grace Hatton
        > To: norse_course@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 12:05 AM
        > Subject: [norse_course] fell
        >
        >
        > Fell is moorland, see "mýrlendi" "fjall or fjöll" we name
        Mountains.
        > But Icelandic "Fell [FeDL]" are Rocky Hills or smaller than
        > mountains: "fjöll".
        >
        > Hi Blanc,
        > I finally got a chance to look up fell in English. Gordon had
        translated
        > fjall to English as fell. In my big English dictionary it says
        a fell is a
        > moorland or barren or rocky hillside.
        >
        > In American English, one rarely encounters the word moorland,
        but in the
        > English of Great Britain, there seem to be very many words for
        different
        > sorts of moorlands.
        > Grace
        > Fred and Grace Hatton
        > Hawley Pa
        >
        >
        >
        > A Norse funny farm, overrun by smart people.
        >
        > Homepage: http://www.hi.is/~haukurth/norse/
        >
        > To escape from this funny farm try rattling off an e-mail to:
        >
        > norse_course-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
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      • Blanc Voden
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fell ... Mountains. ... translated ... fell is a ... in the ... different
        Message 3 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fell

          --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "Fred and Grace Hatton"
          <hatton@...> wrote:
          >
          > Fell is moorland, see "mýrlendi" "fjall or fjöll" we name
          Mountains.
          > But Icelandic "Fell [FeDL]" are Rocky Hills or smaller than
          > mountains: "fjöll".
          >
          > Hi Blanc,
          > I finally got a chance to look up fell in English. Gordon had
          translated
          > fjall to English as fell. In my big English dictionary it says a
          fell is a
          > moorland or barren or rocky hillside.
          >
          > In American English, one rarely encounters the word moorland, but
          in the
          > English of Great Britain, there seem to be very many words for
          different
          > sorts of moorlands.
          > Grace
          > Fred and Grace Hatton
          > Hawley Pa
          >
        • Blanc Voden
          In geography, a fell is a treeless mountain landscape that has been shaped by glacier ice earlier in history. It is the name used in the North of England for a
          Message 4 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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            In geography, a fell is a treeless mountain landscape that has been
            shaped by glacier ice earlier in history. It is the name used in the
            North of England for a large hill or small mountain, especially in
            the Lake District, made famous by the Victorian era Poet Laureate
            William Wordsworth. The valleys are known as dales.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fell

            By this the scene/district of Hrafnkel'sSaga is fell: geographically.

            But EyvindarFjöll (2 really) are mountains as they have crest,
            ridge.

            Mountain range we name FjallGarða.

            In the map I noticed that that "Fell" are also Mountains.
            Fell/Fells plural Fell/Fella

            But Fell stand alone more like hill/knoll and the bottom is kind of
            circular. Mountains appear to be more elongated.

            In neigborhood of Eyvindarfjöll(823) we have: KálfaFell (794),
            SauðaFell, HafursFell(1088) and BúrFell. SnæFell is 1833 m.
            Also Glacier resting the knoll.

            This I reckon most accurate.

            Thanks Uoden

            --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "Fred and Grace Hatton"
            <hatton@...> wrote:
            >
            > Fell is moorland, see "mýrlendi" "fjall or fjöll" we name
            Mountains.
            > But Icelandic "Fell [FeDL]" are Rocky Hills or smaller than
            > mountains: "fjöll".
            >
            > Hi Blanc,
            > I finally got a chance to look up fell in English. Gordon had
            translated
            > fjall to English as fell. In my big English dictionary it says a
            fell is a
            > moorland or barren or rocky hillside.
            >
            > In American English, one rarely encounters the word moorland, but
            in the
            > English of Great Britain, there seem to be very many words for
            different
            > sorts of moorlands.
            > Grace
            > Fred and Grace Hatton
            > Hawley Pa
            >
          • Patricia
            Whinny Muir whinny as in neigh - no I disagree Uoden, I offer the knowledge - not great - which I have of the Scottish Dialect - A whin is a thorn and in
            Message 5 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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              "Whinny Muir"   whinny as in neigh  - no I disagree Uoden, I offer the knowledge - not great - which I have of the Scottish Dialect - A whin is a thorn and in Scotland and Wales on the mountains you may gather "whin-Berries" they are so called for the bushes are thorny.
              Whin in this case certainly - is a thorn and Whinny in this case is indeed "Thorny"
               
              I have copied this for you to better understand it
               
              Whinny-Muir

              (We thought they were singing "to anymore thou com'st at last" in 1972.) The word "muir" is an old form of the modern "moor," which is what the British call desolate, treeless land covered with brush. In the US we would call it "chaparral," though our moors are doubtless hotter and drier than theirs. A "whinny moor" is a moor overgrown with a thorn bush now called gorse (Ulex Europaeus) but in times past also called "whin". The gist of the whinny moor verse is that if you give shoes and stockings to the poor, you will have shoes and stockings on your feet when you must cross a whinny moor in the afterworld. Otherwise, you'll have to walk across the thorns barefoot

              I am happy to do this for you because you have contributed so much to our discussions  is it  correct to call you Uoden or Blanc in friendship I believe it should be Uoden - you bear the name of one of my Gods, and some people put their family name first is that what you do please forgive my ignorance

              Vijay

              Patricia



               

              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 12:53 PM
              Subject: [norse_course] Re: fell

              Hi there Patricia,

              Thanks for the Link.  "Whinny Muir"

              Some poetry?

              mu'ir
                noun feminine genitive mar'a; pl. mar'ann'an, sea, ocean.
              Whinny as neigh.

              The Icelandic "Bards" raconte that "Mar(r)" to "Mars" more
              are "Mar'ir" names Horse (male gender).

              But Male noun "Mar" to "Mar'ar" names sea ocean.

              "Mer(i)" to "Mer'ar" more females are "Mer'ar" also or "Hryss'ur"
              and match Horses (of male gender).

              See also female "MarTröð" nightmar(e)

              Blue, black "far" spot we name "mar'ið" (neutral): the bruise.

              [Berr'y'a>] "Berja" is to strike or glance(strike at an angle?)
              Proverb: "Berja með augum"
              [Merr'y'a>]"Merja" is action of pressing: leaves at least first
              bruises: "MarBletti"

              "Þú merð mig(h)": You bruise me.
              "Íeg(h) mer þig(h)": I bruise you.

              "Hneggjar Mar"

              Se also "el" in "fela" to hide and edd in Feddll>Fell.
              fed(d) that is manna [gentive of Menn.

              FaDL>"Fall" is also corpse of butchered animal. Refering to what
              falls, I reckon.


              Thanks again

              Uoden

              --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia"
              <originalpatricia@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have a dictionary in my PC that says Fell would be Scot. and
              N.England  dialect for hill or moor, but also there is in Legend -
              Scottish Legend - a place of a sort of Spiritual Purgatory - called
              the
              > "Whinny Muir" or thorny moor  where you soul goes to be proven if
              you done well or ill in life.
              > And let us not forget "Killarney's Lakes and Fells" surely they
              too are legendary.
              > I believe we would have to go both North and East of my county -
              Cheshire - to hear this word used unless we have no fells to speak
              of and therefore do not use the word.
              > Perhaps it is but lately consigned to poetry - we could revive it
              > Kveðja
              > Patricia
              >
              > http://www.scotscommunity.com/BOOKS/POETRY/A%20Lyke-Wake%
              20Dirge.htm
              >
              > Verses regarding the "Whinny Muir" for those interested.
              >
              >
              >
              >   ----- Original Message -----
              >   From: Fred and Grace Hatton
              >   To: norse_course@yahoogroups.com
              >   Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 12:05 AM
              >   Subject: [norse_course] fell
              >
              >
              >   Fell is moorland, see "mýrlendi" "fjall or fjöll" we name
              Mountains.
              >   But Icelandic "Fell [FeDL]" are Rocky Hills or smaller than
              >   mountains: "fjöll".
              >
              >   Hi Blanc,
              >   I finally got a chance to look up fell in English.  Gordon had
              translated
              >   fjall to English as fell.  In my big English dictionary it says 
              a fell is a
              >   moorland or barren or rocky hillside.
              >
              >   In American English, one rarely encounters the word moorland,
              but in the
              >   English of Great Britain, there seem to be very many words for
              different
              >   sorts of moorlands.
              >   Grace
              >   Fred and Grace Hatton
              >   Hawley Pa
              >
              >
              >
              >   A Norse funny farm, overrun by smart people.
              >
              >   Homepage: http://www.hi.is/~haukurth/norse/
              >
              >   To escape from this funny farm try rattling off an e-mail to:
              >
              >   norse_course-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >   SPONSORED LINKS Online social science degree  Social science
              course  Social science degree 
              >         Social science education  Bachelor of social science 
              Social science major 
              >
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------------------
              -----------
              >   YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              >
              >     a..  Visit your group "norse_course" on the web.
              >      
              >     b..  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              >      norse_course-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >      
              >     c..  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
              of Service.
              >
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------------------
              -----------
              >




            • llama_nom
              Fells to me would be rugged hills, especially in the north of Britain. It appears in a lot of placenames. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it s a
              Message 6 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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                Fells to me would be rugged hills, especially in the north of
                Britain. It appears in a lot of placenames. According to the Oxford
                English Dictionary, it's a loanword from Old Norse, related to the
                German word Fels "rock":

                1. A hill, mountain. Obs. exc. in proper names of hills in the north-
                west of England, as Bowfell, Scawfell, etc.

                2. A wild, elevated stretch of waste or pasture land; a moorland
                ridge, down. Now chiefly in the north of England and parts of Scotland.

                I suspect my associations for this word have been influenced by
                Tolkien, who may have revived sense 1, and by reading Old Norse.
                According to the OED, English 'moor' originally meant marshland,
                related to ON moerr, and mýrr?, both feminine jo-stems, and
                English 'mere'; the present meaning of 'moor' in English may have been
                influenced by the etymologically unrelated ON mór (gen. mós, pl. móar).

                I wonder how well the meanings match of the Icelandic and English
                cognates heiðr : heath. Where I live, in the east of England, a heath
                is upland, a plateau, not as good farmland as the lowland, and
                traditionally used for pasture rather than agriculture, but often
                cultivated nowadays thanks to improved technology. In parts of
                northern England there are hilly areas called wolds (the Yorkshire
                Wolds, the Lincolnshire Wolds). In the south-east, the same word
                appears as "The Weald". These are all grassy hills. Likewise "The
                Downs" or downland (=upland!). The word is cognate with ON 'völlr',
                which I think is a grassy plain, and with German 'Wald' "forest" <
                Proto-Germanic *walþuz. To me, moor or moorland suggests a hilly area
                a bit more rugged, ranging from grassy areas suitably for grazing to
                heather and rocky outcrops and peat bogs. You can see pictures on
                Google Images of the North York Moors and the Scottish moors. There
                are also famous moors in the southwest of England: Dartmoor, Exmoor.
              • Blanc Voden
                A whinny moor is a moor overgrown with a thorn bush now called gorse (Ulex Europaeus) but in times past also called whin . The gist of the whinny moor verse
                Message 7 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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                  A "whinny moor" is a moor overgrown with a thorn bush now called
                  gorse (Ulex Europaeus) but in times past also called "whin". The
                  gist of the whinny moor verse is that if you give shoes and
                  stockings to the poor, you will have shoes and stockings on your
                  feet when you must cross a whinny moor in the afterworld. Otherwise,
                  you'll have to walk across the thorns barefoot.


                  I do agree Patricia, your are clearly an wit of your measures.

                  I as Blanc (Poetic name) was merely speculating and of course neigh
                  matches hardly ocean. Ulex is not to be found in Iceland I reckon.

                  But GorSe has synonym a Furze : By the ancient Bards
                  F'ur(ð,d,t)s'i.
                  "urð" is earth/dirt least fertile, urt is plant (see jurt).
                  "urd" may be "urdn" ortgraphically spelled "urn".
                  "urð'ar" the one that buries(covers with dirt).
                  H'urð: is door. Furða is Wonder. Þurð is dearth. Þurt is dry.

                  "LíkÞor(d)n" are kind of corns: callus marking the feet.
                  Callus in hands we name "Sigg".

                  We say "að planta", we do not say "að urta" nor "að jurta".
                  If I take the "enn" from "Plant" I get "Plat" that means naive lie.
                  "at" in Icelandic can refer to mud.

                  On the heath (heiðinni: hinni the other one) we find lot of "urtir"
                  as herbs (lækningaJurtir) or spices (kryddJurtir)

                  Thanks Uoden

                  SpAce is mostly Blank as the one deprived the "Óð".
                  See ó as in Low=Ló. óið> óð: fast said.
                • Blanc Voden
                  I wonder how well the meanings match of the Icelandic and English cognates heiðr : heath. Where I live, in the east of England, a heath is upland, a plateau,
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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                    I wonder how well the meanings match of the Icelandic and English
                    cognates heiðr : heath. Where I live, in the east of England, a
                    heath
                    is upland, a plateau, not as good farmland as the lowland, and
                    traditionally used for pasture rather than agriculture, but often
                    cultivated nowadays thanks to improved technology.

                    Hi IIlama,

                    Here a heath is upland, a plateau, not as good farmland as the
                    lowland, and traditionally used for pasture rather than agriculture.

                    Sometime when we were overpopulated People lived in "HeiðarBýli".
                    "Býli" kind af habitations.
                    Heið'i/'ar but
                    Heið'r/urs [He Rún'ar'inn was named ur, but She rún'in úr]is honor.
                    The vegetation of the heath is apt to our climate: inferior to yours.

                    They are Vell'ir. From Völl'um. One is Völl'ur he is from Vell'i.
                    the root is realy Vell. Svell is what? Flat ice surface.
                    Plateau (See Flat á) is high flat surface.

                    Vellir are not necessarily at high point.
                    As water "vellir" (flows
                    þú hellir (pour

                    the out come has most often flat surface.

                    Wall is also flat.
                    "GrasVellir" are necessarily grassy flat surfaces.

                    "Vald" is "ald" under V(end) that you name Power.
                    "Vald" is related to "Val" that is choice [see al of V].
                    If you have choice you can vote that is kind of power.

                    The wood/forest of Germany gave the power against the Romans
                    I rekon my ancient relatives there considered Forest matches "Vald"
                    Germans spell it "Wald". The true meaning of Val or Vald was not
                    censured here in Iceland as elsewhere before I reckon: so it
                    survived?

                    Thanks Uoden
                    Think root of Furze in German (see bowels or tripa in Portuguese)
                    90 percent of The Icelandic female DNA Map is more from Britain
                    than Norway. 70% of the Males, but we were "under" Norwegian Lords
                    from ca 1232 to ca 1550 nearly 300 years. That makes enumeration.
                    I Reckon. Is German ambiguous? Icelandic is at least to aliens.
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