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  • laurenmur913
    Hello every one! My name is Lauren and I am interested in researching all things viking for my SCA persona. I am trying to translate my SCA name into old norse
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 28, 2005
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      Hello every one!
      My name is Lauren and I am interested in researching all things viking
      for my SCA persona. I am trying to translate my SCA name into old norse
      and am not having any luck. I found this group by searching out old
      norse language on yahoo. So here I am! I hope I have found the right
      place.
      My persona is early 800's swedish viking. I have chosen the Birka trade
      township as my "persona origin". I have discovered that in that period
      the swedish language had not even been developed yet and that pretty
      much all the vikings were speaking old norse.
      The name that I have been going by in the SCA is Stella Gudinnasdottir
      which I choose to translate to mean Star Goddess Daughter. However
      Stella is the Latin word for star. So here are the words I am trying to
      translate: Star and Goddess.
      I am greatful for any help you can give me on this and am looking
      forward to learning more about the old norse language from the norse
      course site!
      Blessings!
      Stella* )O(
    • llama_nom
      Hello Lauren, In standardised Old Icelandic, Stjarna Gyðjudóttir Star Goddess´s daughter . In Old Norse of the early 800´s this would look slightly
      Message 2 of 21 , Jul 1, 2005
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        Hello Lauren,

        In standardised Old Icelandic, Stjarna Gyðjudóttir "Star Goddess´s
        daughter". In Old Norse of the early 800´s this would look slightly
        different, maybe: Stiarna/Stearna? GyðjudóttiR (where the capital R
        may have been a palatal sound, part way between [r] and [Z] as in
        English "pleasure"). My main uncertainty is the diphthong /ia/
        or /ea/. The 9th century Rök runestone spells it <ia>. Using the
        letter <i> rather than <j> avoids the problem of deciding whether it
        was a falling or rising diphthong at this time. (Historically it
        changed from the former to the latter, according to Noreen before AD
        900.)

        But the more archaic form would be *stearna (earlier still *sterna <
        Proto-Norse *sternô). In favour of this are loanwords from Norse
        into English: Late Northumbrian 'dearf', Middle English 'derue' < ON
        *dearfR = Old Icelandic djarfr "brave" (see Gordon "Introduction to
        Old Norse" 229.3). The word appears on a later Swedish runestone,
        Husby-Lyhundra, as a personal name <tiarfR> (=diarfR). Other
        inscriptions have variously: tiarfr, tiarfR, terfs (genitive),
        tierf, tihrfR. Unfortunately I don't know how old each of these
        are. You might be able to track down more information with Google...

        http://www.dal.lu.se/runlex/pdf/lexikon.pdf
        http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.htm

        So as a provisional guess maybe Stearna GyðjudóttiR, but I don't
        know much about the timing of these sound changes, so I could be
        wrong.

        Llama Nom





        --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "laurenmur913"
        <laurenmur913@y...> wrote:
        > Hello every one!
        > My name is Lauren and I am interested in researching all things
        viking
        > for my SCA persona. I am trying to translate my SCA name into old
        norse
        > and am not having any luck. I found this group by searching out
        old
        > norse language on yahoo. So here I am! I hope I have found the
        right
        > place.
        > My persona is early 800's swedish viking. I have chosen the Birka
        trade
        > township as my "persona origin". I have discovered that in that
        period
        > the swedish language had not even been developed yet and that
        pretty
        > much all the vikings were speaking old norse.
        > The name that I have been going by in the SCA is Stella
        Gudinnasdottir
        > which I choose to translate to mean Star Goddess Daughter. However
        > Stella is the Latin word for star. So here are the words I am
        trying to
        > translate: Star and Goddess.
        > I am greatful for any help you can give me on this and am looking
        > forward to learning more about the old norse language from the
        norse
        > course site!
        > Blessings!
        > Stella* )O(
      • laurenmur913
        Thank you, Wow, you know your stuff. As I mentioned, I am very new to this. Is there a way to write the last name out in a more english spelling? And could you
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 1, 2005
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          Thank you,
          Wow, you know your stuff. As I mentioned, I am very new to this. Is
          there a way to write the last name out in a more english spelling?
          And could you also maybe spell it out phoneticly for me? I found some
          info on Stjarna, for star. I found a great site that even helps with
          the pronunciation. As for the characters, I do not recognize some of
          the ones you have provided so I am unsure how that would be said.
          Thank you for haveing patience for a Lay Person,
          Blessings,
          Lauren aka Stella aka Stjarna
          --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom" <600cell@o...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Lauren,
          >
          > In standardised Old Icelandic, Stjarna Gyðjudóttir "Star Goddess´s
          > daughter". In Old Norse of the early 800´s this would look
          slightly
          > different, maybe: Stiarna/Stearna? GyðjudóttiR (where the capital R
          > may have been a palatal sound, part way between [r] and [Z] as in
          > English "pleasure"). My main uncertainty is the diphthong /ia/
          > or /ea/. The 9th century Rök runestone spells it <ia>. Using the
          > letter <i> rather than <j> avoids the problem of deciding whether
          it
          > was a falling or rising diphthong at this time. (Historically it
          > changed from the former to the latter, according to Noreen before
          AD
          > 900.)
          >
          > But the more archaic form would be *stearna (earlier still *sterna
          <
          > Proto-Norse *sternô). In favour of this are loanwords from Norse
          > into English: Late Northumbrian 'dearf', Middle English 'derue' <
          ON
          > *dearfR = Old Icelandic djarfr "brave" (see Gordon "Introduction to
          > Old Norse" 229.3). The word appears on a later Swedish runestone,
          > Husby-Lyhundra, as a personal name <tiarfR> (=diarfR). Other
          > inscriptions have variously: tiarfr, tiarfR, terfs (genitive),
          > tierf, tihrfR. Unfortunately I don't know how old each of these
          > are. You might be able to track down more information with
          Google...
          >
          > http://www.dal.lu.se/runlex/pdf/lexikon.pdf
          > http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.htm
          >
          > So as a provisional guess maybe Stearna GyðjudóttiR, but I don't
          > know much about the timing of these sound changes, so I could be
          > wrong.
          >
          > Llama Nom
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "laurenmur913"
          > <laurenmur913@y...> wrote:
          > > Hello every one!
          > > My name is Lauren and I am interested in researching all things
          > viking
          > > for my SCA persona. I am trying to translate my SCA name into old
          > norse
          > > and am not having any luck. I found this group by searching out
          > old
          > > norse language on yahoo. So here I am! I hope I have found the
          > right
          > > place.
          > > My persona is early 800's swedish viking. I have chosen the Birka
          > trade
          > > township as my "persona origin". I have discovered that in that
          > period
          > > the swedish language had not even been developed yet and that
          > pretty
          > > much all the vikings were speaking old norse.
          > > The name that I have been going by in the SCA is Stella
          > Gudinnasdottir
          > > which I choose to translate to mean Star Goddess Daughter.
          However
          > > Stella is the Latin word for star. So here are the words I am
          > trying to
          > > translate: Star and Goddess.
          > > I am greatful for any help you can give me on this and am looking
          > > forward to learning more about the old norse language from the
          > norse
          > > course site!
          > > Blessings!
          > > Stella* )O(
        • akoddsson
          Heil Llama and Lauren. ... daughter . In Old Norse of the early 800´s this would look slightly different, maybe: Stiarna/Stearna? GyðjudóttiR (where the
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 1, 2005
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            Heil Llama and Lauren.

            > Hello Lauren,
            >
            > In standardised Old Icelandic, Stjarna Gyðjudóttir "Star Goddess´s
            daughter". In Old Norse of the early 800´s this would look slightly
            different, maybe: Stiarna/Stearna? GyðjudóttiR (where the capital R
            may have been a palatal sound, part way between [r] and [Z] as in
            English "pleasure"). My main uncertainty is the diphthong /ia/
            or /ea/. The 9th century Rök runestone spells it <ia>. Using the
            letter <i> rather than <j> avoids the problem of deciding whether it
            was a falling or rising diphthong at this time. (Historically it
            changed from the former to the latter, according to Noreen before AD
            900.)

            Correct. See below.

            > But the more archaic form would be *stearna (earlier still *sterna
            Proto-Norse *sternô). In favour of this are loanwords from Norse
            into English: Late Northumbrian 'dearf', Middle English 'derue' < ON
            *dearfR = Old Icelandic djarfr "brave" (see Gordon "Introduction to
            Old Norse" 229.3). The word appears on a later Swedish runestone,
            Husby-Lyhundra, as a personal name <tiarfR> (=diarfR). Other
            inscriptions have variously: tiarfr, tiarfR, terfs (genitive),
            tierf, tihrfR. Unfortunately I don't know how old each of these
            are. You might be able to track down more information with Google...
            >
            > http://www.dal.lu.se/runlex/pdf/lexikon.pdf
            > http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.htm
            >
            > So as a provisional guess maybe Stearna GyðjudóttiR, but I don't
            > know much about the timing of these sound changes, so I could be
            > wrong.

            Here is what happened here ;) :
            ea-to-ia before 900 (as above and as you show in your citations of
            9th cent. ON loanwords in OE)
            R-r 900 in west norse, but often much later in east (only 3, perhaps
            4, west norse inscritions contain R during the viking age, and they
            date to 800-900, variously - 1 from Oslo Åseberg ship, 1 from Jamta-
            land, 1 from Norse settlement in Ireland). Th Åseberg item contains
            R after a dental t/th/dh/d and is from around 800-830 linguistically
            I think (but see archeaological dating on this), whereas the Jamta-
            land example does not show R after a dental (where it disappeared at
            the same time, around 900, in Old Danish inscription). The R in the
            nom. dóttiR is an analogical formation, found in all nominatives of
            this declension in Danish inscription from 800 beyond 1000, such as
            fadiR módiR systiR bródiR dóttiR, but is not from Proto-Norse in
            this position (compare attested 'swestar' and Germanic languages on
            this in general). Incidentally, the PN for the name in question
            would be *sternô gudjôn dohtar (*sternô just as you have it). The
            masc. gudja is attested in PN, but show svarabhakti i or some kind
            of analagical Sievers in the inscription: gudija. ;) This word, of
            course, like its feminine equivalent, means 'priest'. It is not a
            personal name, but a title - thus, not surprisingly, the word does
            not occur as a personal name in inscription or latin-letter sources
            containing actual pre-christian norse personal names. ON stiarn is
            also extremely rare, if not non-existent, as an attested personal
            name in west-norse from pre-christian times (but I can check my name-
            database on this just to be sure; compare, however, Old Gutnish
            Hvîta-Stiarna in Guta Saga).

            ek gudja mathlarûnôz raist ;)

            > Llama Nom
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "laurenmur913"
            > <laurenmur913@y...> wrote:
            > > Hello every one!
            > > My name is Lauren and I am interested in researching all things
            > viking
            > > for my SCA persona. I am trying to translate my SCA name into
            old
            > norse
            > > and am not having any luck. I found this group by searching out
            > old
            > > norse language on yahoo. So here I am! I hope I have found the
            > right
            > > place.
            > > My persona is early 800's swedish viking. I have chosen the
            Birka
            > trade
            > > township as my "persona origin". I have discovered that in that
            > period
            > > the swedish language had not even been developed yet and that
            > pretty
            > > much all the vikings were speaking old norse.
            > > The name that I have been going by in the SCA is Stella
            > Gudinnasdottir
            > > which I choose to translate to mean Star Goddess Daughter.
            However
            > > Stella is the Latin word for star. So here are the words I am
            > trying to
            > > translate: Star and Goddess.
            > > I am greatful for any help you can give me on this and am
            looking
            > > forward to learning more about the old norse language from the
            > norse
            > > course site!
            > > Blessings!
            > > Stella* )O(
          • llama_nom
            ... Do we have any indication as to how long before 900? ... Don t be too sure of that! Konrad knows much more about this area than me. ... there a way to
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 2, 2005
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              --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "akoddsson"
              <konrad_oddsson@y...> wrote:

              > ea-to-ia before 900 (as above and as you show in your citations of
              > 9th cent.


              Do we have any indication as to how long before 900?


              > --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "laurenmur913"
              > <laurenmur913@y...> wrote:

              > Wow, you know your stuff.


              Don't be too sure of that! Konrad knows much more about this area
              than me.


              > As I mentioned, I am very new to this. Is
              there a way to write the last name out in a more english spelling?
              And could you also maybe spell it out phoneticly for me? I found some
              info on Stjarna, for star. I found a great site that even helps with
              the pronunciation. As for the characters, I do not recognize some of
              the ones you have provided so I am unsure how that would be said.


              The address here is a site with system for representing phonetic
              symbols with computers. This will probably seem MORE complicated at
              first, but at least it avoids the confusion and ambiguity of trying
              to indicate pronunciation of foreign sounds with English conventions.

              http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/home.htm


              Stjarna Gyðjudóttir
              Icelandic spelling. In this case, identical for Modern Icelandic
              and standardised Old Norse.
              1. Old Norse (13th c. reconstructed pronunciation)
              [stjarna gyDjUdo:ttIr]--[j] = English <y> in 'yes'; [y] = French <u>
              in 'fumer'; [U] = Northern British English <u> in 'gulp'; [o:] =
              German <o> in 'tot'; [i] = English <i> in 'bit'; vowels all keep
              their distinct quality, even in unstressed positions; and see
              further explanation below.
              2. Modern Icelandic [stjatna cIDjYtouhtIr]--explanation on demand!


              Stiarna GyþjudóttiR
              This I think is how the name might be transcribed if it had appeared
              in a Swedish runic inscription of the 9th century. The
              pronunciation would be similar to the Old Norse reconstructed one
              above, except that <ia> is a falling diphthong, that is with the
              emphasis on the first vowel <i>. The sampa symbol [D] is the sound
              of <th> in English <the>. The <tt> was pronounced double, as in
              modern Swedish or Italian. Think of English 'part-time'. I'm not
              sure of the exact quality of the unstressed vowels, but presumably
              something not too distant from this. According to
              Gordon's "Introduction to Old Norse", medieval Swedish manuscripts
              show a more careful system of vowel harmony than is usual in West
              Norse, but I'm not qualified to comment on that.

              The final <R> is somewhere between [r] and [Z], as mentioned. Maybe
              pronounced like the Czech 'r' with a little upsidedown 'v' on top.
              Or like the <s> in 'pleasure' but with a hint of [r]. Or like the
              final sound you might hear in some Scottish pronunciations of
              e.g. 'furs', 'hairs'. Of course, no one knows exactly, but there
              are clues in the way it affected nearby vowels (suggesting a palatal
              sound) and in the way it developed later, eventually becoming
              confused with /r/.

              To spell the name with English letters, you could go with either
              Gythju- or Gydju-. The former might be a good idea because it makes
              the sound clear to English speakers. The latter is perfectly
              acceptable though and unambiguous in terms of the Norse sound
              system. It's generally used in modern translations from Old Norse.
              In fact some medieval manuscripts use <d> where modern editions
              print <ð>. The marking of long vowels was very inconsistent in old
              manuscripts, and wasn't a feature of runic orthography of the 9th
              century. Konrad has suggested (for writing Proto Norse) using <z>
              for the phoneme usually transcribed as <R>. That's one possibility:
              Stiarna Gythjudottiz? Or if that looks too bizarre you could
              (anachronistically) use the later spelling and just remember that it
              was pronounced more like 'rz'. Or insist on runes... Speaking of
              which:

              http://www.arild-hauge.com/sruner.htm

              Llama Nom
            • laurenmur913
              Thank you again for all of your research! I am very greatful. You have made it easy to understand and also very interesting! The Society College of Heralds
              Message 6 of 21 , Jul 3, 2005
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                Thank you again for all of your research! I am very greatful.
                You have made it easy to understand and also very interesting!
                The Society College of Heralds should have no problem passing my
                name. They require quite a bit of historical information in your name
                submission. With everything I have recieved here so far I think I am
                set.
                Many Thanks and Blessings,
                Stiarna Gythjudottir


                --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom" <600cell@o...> wrote:
                > --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "akoddsson"
                > <konrad_oddsson@y...> wrote:
                >
                > > ea-to-ia before 900 (as above and as you show in your citations
                of
                > > 9th cent.
                >
                >
                > Do we have any indication as to how long before 900?
                >
                >
                > > --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "laurenmur913"
                > > <laurenmur913@y...> wrote:
                >
                > > Wow, you know your stuff.
                >
                >
                > Don't be too sure of that! Konrad knows much more about this area
                > than me.
                >
                >
                > > As I mentioned, I am very new to this. Is
                > there a way to write the last name out in a more english spelling?
                > And could you also maybe spell it out phoneticly for me? I found
                some
                > info on Stjarna, for star. I found a great site that even helps with
                > the pronunciation. As for the characters, I do not recognize some of
                > the ones you have provided so I am unsure how that would be said.
                >
                >
                > The address here is a site with system for representing phonetic
                > symbols with computers. This will probably seem MORE complicated
                at
                > first, but at least it avoids the confusion and ambiguity of trying
                > to indicate pronunciation of foreign sounds with English
                conventions.
                >
                > http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/home.htm
                >
                >
                > Stjarna Gyðjudóttir
                > Icelandic spelling. In this case, identical for Modern Icelandic
                > and standardised Old Norse.
                > 1. Old Norse (13th c. reconstructed pronunciation)
                > [stjarna gyDjUdo:ttIr]--[j] = English <y> in 'yes'; [y] = French
                <u>
                > in 'fumer'; [U] = Northern British English <u> in 'gulp'; [o:] =
                > German <o> in 'tot'; [i] = English <i> in 'bit'; vowels all keep
                > their distinct quality, even in unstressed positions; and see
                > further explanation below.
                > 2. Modern Icelandic [stjatna cIDjYtouhtIr]--explanation on demand!
                >
                >
                > Stiarna GyþjudóttiR
                > This I think is how the name might be transcribed if it had
                appeared
                > in a Swedish runic inscription of the 9th century. The
                > pronunciation would be similar to the Old Norse reconstructed one
                > above, except that <ia> is a falling diphthong, that is with the
                > emphasis on the first vowel <i>. The sampa symbol [D] is the sound
                > of <th> in English <the>. The <tt> was pronounced double, as in
                > modern Swedish or Italian. Think of English 'part-time'. I'm not
                > sure of the exact quality of the unstressed vowels, but presumably
                > something not too distant from this. According to
                > Gordon's "Introduction to Old Norse", medieval Swedish manuscripts
                > show a more careful system of vowel harmony than is usual in West
                > Norse, but I'm not qualified to comment on that.
                >
                > The final <R> is somewhere between [r] and [Z], as mentioned.
                Maybe
                > pronounced like the Czech 'r' with a little upsidedown 'v' on top.
                > Or like the <s> in 'pleasure' but with a hint of [r]. Or like the
                > final sound you might hear in some Scottish pronunciations of
                > e.g. 'furs', 'hairs'. Of course, no one knows exactly, but there
                > are clues in the way it affected nearby vowels (suggesting a
                palatal
                > sound) and in the way it developed later, eventually becoming
                > confused with /r/.
                >
                > To spell the name with English letters, you could go with either
                > Gythju- or Gydju-. The former might be a good idea because it
                makes
                > the sound clear to English speakers. The latter is perfectly
                > acceptable though and unambiguous in terms of the Norse sound
                > system. It's generally used in modern translations from Old
                Norse.
                > In fact some medieval manuscripts use <d> where modern editions
                > print <ð>. The marking of long vowels was very inconsistent in old
                > manuscripts, and wasn't a feature of runic orthography of the 9th
                > century. Konrad has suggested (for writing Proto Norse) using <z>
                > for the phoneme usually transcribed as <R>. That's one
                possibility:
                > Stiarna Gythjudottiz? Or if that looks too bizarre you could
                > (anachronistically) use the later spelling and just remember that
                it
                > was pronounced more like 'rz'. Or insist on runes... Speaking of
                > which:
                >
                > http://www.arild-hauge.com/sruner.htm
                >
                > Llama Nom
              • meow63
                I am a writer and working on a book where the hero is a viking. I am researching the heritage and the language and wanted to know if there is anyone here who
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 18, 2006
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                  I am a writer and working on a book where the hero is a viking. I am
                  researching the heritage and the language and wanted to know if there
                  is anyone here who would be willing to be my guide in this? I would
                  like to be able to ask questions concerning phrases and age/time
                  related questions.

                  He is from the Scandanavian Norway area and lived around the year 725AD
                  I hope that someone will be willing to help me with this. Right now, I
                  am looking for some phrases below.

                  Good evening
                  Rest Well
                  Safe journey
                  little one


                  Thank you
                  Mary Alice
                  meow63@...
                • llama_nom
                  ... Here are some suggestions, but I m not infallible! I haven t seen any examples of phrases like good evening in Old Norse. Where they ever used as a
                  Message 8 of 21 , Apr 19, 2006
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                    >
                    > Good evening........gott kveld; góðan aptan
                    > Rest Well...........sof vel! (= sleep well); hvíl vel!
                    > Safe journey........far heill!
                    > little one..........þú inn litli


                    Here are some suggestions, but I'm not infallible! I haven't seen any
                    examples of phrases like "good evening" in Old Norse. Where they ever
                    used as a greeting, I wonder? The typical all-purpose greeting
                    consists of variations of "heill!" or "heill þú!" or "vertu heill!",
                    meaning "be well".

                    Note: some of these word forms change depending on the gender of
                    whoever is being spoken to, and how many of them there are. The forms
                    above are those you'd find in a dictionary and are right for talking
                    to one male person. If one female person is addressed, you would
                    leave off the final -l of heill, thus: far heil! And for one little
                    female person: þú in litla. The other examples (vel, etc.) stay the
                    same.

                    If more than one person is being addressed, you would add the ending -
                    ið to the verbs: sofið, farið, hvílið. The adjectives change too.
                    For more than one male: farið heilir! For more than one female: farið
                    heilar! For a mixed group: farið heil! This is actually the neuter
                    plural, but it has the same form as the feminine singular.

                    Sometimes as a mark of respect, the plural forms are used when
                    addressing a king.

                    Llama Nom
                  • Mary Pritchard
                    Thank you so much for the information! I am slowly going through the courses to learn. This will assist me quite a bit to start. I appreciate your help with
                    Message 9 of 21 , Apr 19, 2006
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                      Thank you so much for the information! I am slowly
                      going through the courses to learn. This will assist
                      me quite a bit to start.

                      I appreciate your help with these. I may have more
                      questions as I read more.

                      Sincerely

                      Mary Alice



                      __________________________________________________
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                    • Patricia
                      Hello Mary Alice, I am Patricia, I know of a dictionary which gives the English into Old Norse it is compiled my Ross Arthur, and of course it is not so much
                      Message 10 of 21 , Apr 20, 2006
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                        Hello Mary Alice, I am Patricia, I know of a dictionary which gives the English into Old Norse it is compiled my Ross Arthur, and of course it is not so much fun as writing to us, but I can hunt out the URL for you and if you then like to check back with us just to be sure would that help you in addition to the e.mails we exchange.
                        We have a couple of really skilled people on the course (I am an exception but learning) and I should be happy to help in as much as I am able
                        Kveðja
                        Patricia
                         
                        -------Original Message-------
                         
                        Date: 04/20/06 16:48:24
                        Subject: Re: [norse_course] Re: Greetings
                         
                        Thank you so much for the information! I am slowly
                        going through the courses to learn.  This will assist
                        me quite a bit to start.

                        I appreciate your help with these. I may have more
                        questions as I read more.

                        Sincerely

                        Mary Alice



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                      • Joseph Bloch
                        Ask and ye shall receive. http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/language/English-Old_Norse.pdf Joseph ... Ask and ye shall receive.
                        Message 11 of 21 , Apr 20, 2006
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                          Ask and ye shall receive.

                          http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/language/English-Old_Norse.pdf

                          Joseph

                          On 4/20/06, Patricia <originalpatricia@...> wrote:
                          Hello Mary Alice, I am Patricia, I know of a dictionary which gives the English into Old Norse it is compiled my Ross Arthur, and of course it is not so much fun as writing to us, but I can hunt out the URL for you and if you then like to check back with us just to be sure would that help you in addition to the e.mails we exchange.
                          We have a couple of really skilled people on the course (I am an exception but learning) and I should be happy to help in as much as I am able
                          Kveðja
                          Patricia
                           
                          -------Original Message-------
                           
                          Date: 04/20/06 16:48:24
                          Subject: Re: [norse_course] Re: Greetings
                           
                          Thank you so much for the information! I am slowly
                          going through the courses to learn.  This will assist
                          me quite a bit to start.

                          I appreciate your help with these. I may have more
                          questions as I read more.

                          Sincerely

                          Mary Alice



                          __________________________________________________
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                          Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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                          A Norse funny farm, overrun by smart people.

                          Homepage: http://www.hi.is/~haukurth/norse/

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                        • Mary Pritchard
                          Thank you Patricia, that would be wonderful! I don t want to clog the list up with lots of questions I can figure out on my own, but it would be wonderful to
                          Message 12 of 21 , Apr 20, 2006
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                            Thank you Patricia, that would be wonderful! I don't
                            want to clog the list up with lots of questions I can
                            figure out on my own, but it would be wonderful to
                            verify occasionaly what I am trying to learn

                            Thank you very much!

                            Mary Alice



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                          • Mary Pritchard
                            Joseph, Thank you so much also! Hopefully I will have intellegent questions as I continue. Mary Alice Mary Alice Pritchard Ghostly Mistakes, Inara Press May
                            Message 13 of 21 , Apr 20, 2006
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                              Joseph,

                              Thank you so much also! Hopefully I will have
                              intellegent questions as I continue.

                              Mary Alice



                              Mary Alice Pritchard
                              Ghostly Mistakes, Inara Press
                              May 17, 2006
                              www.maryalicepritchard.com



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                            • Patricia
                              Fortunately Joseph did well for us for I have been off line a while now, your letter was one of twelve I have caught up now Patricia ... From: Mary Pritchard
                              Message 14 of 21 , Apr 20, 2006
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                                Fortunately Joseph did well for us  for I have been off line a while now, your letter was one of twelve  I have caught up now
                                Patricia
                                 
                                 
                                -------Original Message-------
                                 
                                Date: 04/20/06 21:43:08
                                Subject: Re: [norse_course] Re: Greetings
                                 
                                Thank you Patricia, that would be wonderful! I don't
                                want to clog the list up with lots of questions I can
                                figure out on my own, but it would be wonderful to
                                verify occasionaly what I am trying to learn

                                Thank you very much!

                                Mary Alice



                                __________________________________________________
                                Do You Yahoo!?
                                Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                http://mail.yahoo.com
                                 
                              • Andrew Higgins
                                To All I have been monitoring this excellent group and have decided to devote more time in 2011 to Norse language studies and would like to join in the
                                Message 15 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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                                  To All 

                                  I have been monitoring this excellent group and have decided to devote more time in 2011 to Norse language studies and would like to join in the translation fun!!!  Have worked through the EV Gordon and Michael Barnes books and on a trip to Iceland last year read large chunks of Egil's Saga in the original.   Look forward to joining in on the IPAD  Happy YuleFest to all!!

                                  Best Andy 

                                  Sent from the IPAD of Andrew Higgins asthiggins@...  asthiggins on Twitter and on my Blog at Wotan's Musings 

                                • Patti (Wilson)
                                  Hearty Welcome Andy A Glad Yule Tide and A Prosperous New Year Patricia ... From: Andrew Higgins Date: 23/12/2010 17:00:55 To: norse_course@egroups.com
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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                                    Hearty Welcome Andy
                                    A Glad Yule Tide and A Prosperous New Year
                                    Patricia 
                                     
                                    -------Original Message-------
                                     
                                    Date: 23/12/2010 17:00:55
                                    Subject: [norse_course] Greetings
                                     
                                    To All 

                                    I have been monitoring this excellent group and have decided to devote more time in 2011 to Norse language studies and would like to join in the translation fun!!!  Have worked through the EV Gordon and Michael Barnes books and on a trip to Iceland last year read large chunks of Egil's Saga in the original.   Look forward to joining in on the IPAD  Happy YuleFest to all!!

                                    Best Andy 

                                    Sent from the IPAD of Andrew Higgins asthiggins@...  asthiggins on Twitter and on my Blog at Wotan's Musings 

                                     
                                  • Paul Hansen
                                    Velkominn, Andy. And, like you, I tend to read more than write on norse_course. By the BTW, how is it decided who translates the next chapter or sub-chapter
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Dec 27, 2010
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                                      Velkominn, Andy.
                                      And, like you, I tend to read more than write on norse_course.
                                      By the BTW, how is it decided who translates the next chapter or sub-chapter when working through a saga?
                                      Is it first-come, first-to-present?
                                       
                                      Med vennligste hilsener,
                                      Paul Hansen

                                       

                                      To: norse_course@yahoogroups.com
                                      From: asthiggins@...
                                      Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2010 15:08:06 +0000
                                      Subject: [norse_course] Greetings

                                       
                                      To All 

                                      I have been monitoring this excellent group and have decided to devote more time in 2011 to Norse language studies and would like to join in the translation fun!!!  Have worked through the EV Gordon and Michael Barnes books and on a trip to Iceland last year read large chunks of Egil's Saga in the original.   Look forward to joining in on the IPAD  Happy YuleFest to all!!

                                      Best Andy 

                                      Sent from the IPAD of Andrew Higgins asthiggins@...  asthiggins on Twitter and on my Blog at Wotan's Musings 


                                    • Brian M. Scott
                                      At 6:56:09 PM on Monday, December 27, 2010, Paul Hansen ... On Sundays Grace normally posts the next bit of Laxdœla saga to be translated, and within the next
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Dec 27, 2010
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                                        At 6:56:09 PM on Monday, December 27, 2010, Paul Hansen
                                        wrote:

                                        > By the BTW, how is it decided who translates the next
                                        > chapter or sub-chapter when working through a saga? Is it
                                        > first-come, first-to-present?

                                        On Sundays Grace normally posts the next bit of Laxdœla saga
                                        to be translated, and within the next day or two the three
                                        folks who have been taking part independently post their
                                        translations. She and Rob have been working through Jackson
                                        Crawford's 'Tattúínárdœla saga' ('What If Star Wars Were an
                                        Icelandic Saga?') on the same basis, but with the passages
                                        posted on Thursday. (I think that I got the days right; I
                                        didn't actually check.) In both cases I've been coming
                                        along behind to try to sort out the especially tricky bits.

                                        I expect that we'll follow pretty much the same pattern when
                                        we take up againn in mid-January.

                                        Brian
                                      • Andrew Higgins
                                        Brian, Paul and all Brilliant love the structure and have been reading thruCrawford s Tattúínárdœla saga on line which would be great to dig into. Also
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Dec 28, 2010
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                                          Brian, Paul and all

                                          Brilliant love the structure and have been reading thruCrawford's 'Tattúínárdœla saga on line which would be great to dig into. Also if there is any interest I am also going to be reading The
                                          Saga of King Heidrek the Wise in the 50th anniversary edition by Christopher Tolkien (as you. Can probably tell from my blog I am a major Tolkien lover) and will attempt a translation of this fornaldsogur from Old Norse - so three projects should keep me busy!!!!

                                          Look forward to taking part

                                          Best, Andy

                                          Sent from the IPAD of Andrew Higgins asthiggins@... asthiggins on Twitter
                                          And at his blog Wotan's Musings http://wotanselvishmusings.blogspot.com/


                                          On 28 Dec 2010, at 03:28, "Brian M. Scott" <bm.brian@...> wrote:

                                          > At 6:56:09 PM on Monday, December 27, 2010, Paul Hansen
                                          > wrote:
                                          >
                                          >> By the BTW, how is it decided who translates the next
                                          >> chapter or sub-chapter when working through a saga? Is it
                                          >> first-come, first-to-present?
                                          >
                                          > On Sundays Grace normally posts the next bit of Laxdœla saga
                                          > to be translated, and within the next day or two the three
                                          > folks who have been taking part independently post their
                                          > translations. She and Rob have been working through Jackson
                                          > Crawford's 'Tattúínárdœla saga' ('What If Star Wars Were an
                                          > Icelandic Saga?') on the same basis, but with the passages
                                          > posted on Thursday. (I think that I got the days right; I
                                          > didn't actually check.) In both cases I've been coming
                                          > along behind to try to sort out the especially tricky bits.
                                          >
                                          > I expect that we'll follow pretty much the same pattern when
                                          > we take up againn in mid-January.
                                          >
                                          > Brian
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > ------------------------------------
                                          >
                                          > A Norse funny farm, overrun by smart people.
                                          >
                                          > Homepage: http://www.hi.is/~haukurth/norse/
                                          >
                                          > To escape from this funny farm try rattling off an e-mail to:
                                          >
                                          > norse_course-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
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