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3 Olden Swedish W's and 1 Gutnish 'haizl' - what say ye?

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  • konrad_oddsson
    Here are three Swedish W s from the story of Sancto Erico: Sidhan han hafdhe sigher Wonnit ok han var á sínom boenum... ...ok swá som han var varla
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 25, 2003
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      Here are three Swedish W's from the story of Sancto Erico:

      'Sidhan han hafdhe sigher Wonnit ok han var á sínom boenum...'
      '...ok swá som han var varla doedher, thá Wordho grymi grymare...'
      '...ok hænna fingir váro vaath Wordhin aff hans blódhe...'

      What say ye? Are these W's olden or made anew?

      When outland wights began to live in Gutland, some leading men made
      the following law against hailing inland wights(Guta Lagh 4):

      'Tha en nequar verthr at thi sandr ok laithas hanum so vitni a hand
      et hann hafi HAIZL hequara tha mith mati etha dryckiu senni sun ai
      fylgir cristnum sithi tha ir hann sacr at thrim marcum vithr kirkiu
      menn. En þair syct vinna.'

      Truely, some churchmen did find ways to gather shillings for their
      own needs. Yet I wonder, what doth 'haizl' mean? In West Norse we
      have doing words like 'at heiðra' and 'at heilsa', but no 'heizl'
      showeth up in wordbooks. Is 'haizl' spelled mistakenly or rightly?
      What doth it mean? What say ye?

      Good farings,
      Konrad.
    • Haukur Thorgeirsson
      ... I d say made anew. This w was, as far as we know, long gone. We have the same thing in Icelandic and Faroese where wordlings like vóð sometimes rear
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 26, 2003
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        Hinn 26. September 2003 lét konrad_oddsson þetta frá sér fara:
        > Here are three Swedish W's from the story of Sancto Erico:
        >
        > 'Sidhan han hafdhe sigher Wonnit ok han var á sínom boenum...'
        > '...ok swá som han var varla doedher, thá Wordho grymi grymare...'
        > '...ok hænna fingir váro vaath Wordhin aff hans blódhe...'
        >
        > What say ye? Are these W's olden or made anew?

        I'd say made anew. This 'w' was, as far as we know,
        long gone. We have the same thing in Icelandic and
        Faroese where wordlings like 'vóð' sometimes rear
        their heads.

        vaða - (v)óð - (v)óðu - vaðið
        vinna - vann - (v)unnu - (v)unnið

        We call this 'áhrifsbreyting' but the Latin/Greek word
        is 'analogia'.

        :)

        Haukur
      • konrad_oddsson
        ... grymare... ... I take under with thee. These W s are hardly shown on stones much beyond 600. Many lines from Ái and Edda must in truth be olden, as there
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 28, 2003
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          --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, Haukur Thorgeirsson
          <haukurth@h...> wrote:
          > Hinn 26. September 2003 lét konrad_oddsson þetta frá sér fara:
          > > Here are three Swedish W's from the story of Sancto Erico:
          > >
          > > 'Sidhan han hafdhe sigher Wonnit ok han var á sínom boenum...'
          > > '...ok swá som han var varla doedher, thá Wordho grymi
          grymare...'
          > > '...ok hænna fingir váro vaath Wordhin aff hans blódhe...'
          > >
          > > What say ye? Are these W's olden or made anew?
          >
          > I'd say made anew. This 'w' was, as far as we know,
          > long gone. We have the same thing in Icelandic and
          > Faroese where wordlings like 'vóð' sometimes rear
          > their heads.
          >
          > vaða - (v)óð - (v)óðu - vaðið
          > vinna - vann - (v)unnu - (v)unnið

          I take under with thee. These W's are hardly shown on stones much
          beyond 600. Many lines from Ái and Edda must in truth be olden, as
          there are widely missing W's steadying with missing W's where we
          know these W's once were. Mig grunar...

          > We call this 'áhrifsbreyting' but the Latin/Greek word
          > is 'analogia'.
          >
          > :)

          .) Me thinketh that fine to have such words from our own stream,
          which flowed its own and selfsame way from 'IE'.

          Kindreed.

          > Haukur
        • sjuler
          A Dalecarlian dialect which is similar to Dalska is the womos dialect spoken in Våmhus (standard Swedish spelling). They have turned o- and ó- into vo-
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 30, 2003
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            A Dalecarlian dialect which is similar to Dalska is the womos dialect
            spoken in Våmhus (standard Swedish spelling). They have turned 'o-'
            and 'ó-' into 'vo-' and 'vó-' resp. I list some words found at
            http://w1.250.telia.com/~u25000104/vdialog_w.html


            wost (m) - ost (Old Dalecarlian *ostr)
            wuo (m) - ho (OldDal *hór)
            wuodygd (f) - odygd (OldDal *ódygð)
            wuol (n) - hål (OldDal *ol, ON hol)
            wuolaik (adj.)- olik (OldDal *ólíkr)
            wuoweðär (n) - oväder (OldDal *óveðr; 'v' pronunced "w")
            wuor (pron.) - vår (OldDal *ór)
            wuorb (n) - orv (OldDal *orf; 'f' pronunced "bh")
            wuorgur (f) - orglar (in plural by some reason - OldDal *???)

            The words to the right are - of course - Swedish ones, but they
            should be intelligible for the Old Norse Course student, I think.

            Sklär (pl.)/Nikulåsär (gen.)/Ulåvär (nom.)/etc
            Sjurd


            --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, "konrad_oddsson"
            <konrad_oddsson@y...> wrote:
            > Here are three Swedish W's from the story of Sancto Erico:
            >
            > 'Sidhan han hafdhe sigher Wonnit ok han var á sínom boenum...'
            > '...ok swá som han var varla doedher, thá Wordho grymi grymare...'
            > '...ok hænna fingir váro vaath Wordhin aff hans blódhe...'
            >
            > What say ye? Are these W's olden or made anew?
            >
            > When outland wights began to live in Gutland, some leading men made
            > the following law against hailing inland wights(Guta Lagh 4):
            >
            > 'Tha en nequar verthr at thi sandr ok laithas hanum so vitni a hand
            > et hann hafi HAIZL hequara tha mith mati etha dryckiu senni sun ai
            > fylgir cristnum sithi tha ir hann sacr at thrim marcum vithr kirkiu
            > menn. En þair syct vinna.'
            >
            > Truely, some churchmen did find ways to gather shillings for their
            > own needs. Yet I wonder, what doth 'haizl' mean? In West Norse we
            > have doing words like 'at heiðra' and 'at heilsa', but no 'heizl'
            > showeth up in wordbooks. Is 'haizl' spelled mistakenly or rightly?
            > What doth it mean? What say ye?
            >
            > Good farings,
            > Konrad.
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