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Bodvar Bjarki lines 8-20

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  • Sarah Bowen
    Sæl Daniel, Jed, Laurel, Simon, Thomas and anyone else who wants to join in! Simon asked for some background information on the tale, so here s some info
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 15, 2003
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      Sæl Daniel, Jed, Laurel, Simon, Thomas and anyone else who wants to join in!
       
      Simon asked for some background information on the tale, so here's some info taken from the introduction to Byock's translation...
       
      It is one of the major Scandinavian legendary tales and belongs to the mythic-heroic sagas known as fornaldar sagas.  These tell of events which are supposed to have occurred long before the settlement of Iceland.
       
      Hrolf's saga was written in the 14th century and is similar to the English poem Beowulf.  Both draw on a common tradition of storytelling, recounting events that are supposed to taken place in the 5th or 6th century in Denmark.  Both Beowulf and Hrolf's saga provides information about a powerful champion (Beowulf and Bodvar) whose bearlike character may reflect the distant memory of early cultic practices.
       
       
       
      If you want to know how Bodvar came to be known as Bjarki, you'll have to read the first 23 chapters of the saga!!!
      Anyway, here are lines 8-20 from Gordon's reader in the attachment.
       
      Have fun!
       
      Sarah.
    • Gerald Mcharg
      ... From: Sarah Bowen To: norse_course@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, April 15, 2003 8:11 PM Subject: [norse_course] Bodvar Bjarki lines 8-20 Sæl Daniel, Jed,
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 18, 2003
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        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, April 15, 2003 8:11 PM
        Subject: [norse_course] Bodvar Bjarki lines 8-20

        Sæl Daniel, Jed, Laurel, Simon, Thomas and anyone else who wants to join in!
         
        Simon asked for some background information on the tale, so here's some info taken from the introduction to Byock's translation...
         
        It is one of the major Scandinavian legendary tales and belongs to the mythic-heroic sagas known as fornaldar sagas.  These tell of events which are supposed to have occurred long before the settlement of Iceland.
         
        Hrolf's saga was written in the 14th century and is similar to the English poem Beowulf.  Both draw on a common tradition of storytelling, recounting events that are supposed to taken place in the 5th or 6th century in Denmark.  Both Beowulf and Hrolf's saga provides information about a powerful champion (Beowulf and Bodvar) whose bearlike character may reflect the distant memory of early cultic practices.
         
         
         
        If you want to know how Bodvar came to be known as Bjarki, you'll have to read the first 23 chapters of the saga!!!
        Anyway, here are lines 8-20 from Gordon's reader in the attachment.
         
        Have fun!
         
        Sarah.
         
        Sarah
        Could I be designated as one of the group who will submit translations which are 'looser' without becoming completely detached from the literal. So in this context I would translate 'thangat' as 'over to it' as we know that 'thangat' is where the pile of bones is.
        Here goes;
        Bothvar went over to it and asked who was inside the pile of bones. Then - and somewhat timidly - he got his answer. 'I am Hott, good sir,'  'Why are you here', said Bothvar, 'and what are you doing?' 'I am making myself a shelter, good sir'. Bothvar said, 'You're in a sorry state with your shelter!'  Bothvar grabbed him and yanked him up out of the bone-heap. Hott yelled out ' Now you want to kill me!  I make this thing so that I have it well-prepared beforehand and now you have broken my shelter apart and I had it built
        so high around me that it protected me well against all your smacks so that not a  wallop has got to me for a long time, but it still wasn't as well set up as I thought it it should have been.'

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      • Daniel Bray
        Heill Sarah, Here s my translation: Böðvarr Bjarki at the Court of King Hrólf Chapter 23. lines 8-20 Bothvar and Hott introduce themselves! Böðvarr gengr
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 20, 2003
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          Heill Sarah,

          Here's my translation:

          Böðvarr Bjarki at the Court of King Hrólf
          Chapter 23. lines 8-20

          Bothvar and Hott introduce themselves!

          Böðvarr gengr þangat til ok spyrr hverr þar væri í beinahrúgunni.  Þá var honum svarat ok heldr óframliga: “Höttr heiti ek, bokki sæll.”  “Hví ertu hér,” segir Böðvarr, “eða hvat gørir þú?”  Höttr segir, “Ek gøri mér skjaldborg, bokki sæll.”  Böðvarr sagði, “Vesall ertu þinnar skjaldborgar!”  Böðvarr þrífr til hans ok hnykkir honum upp ór beinahrúgunni.  Höttr kvað þá hátt við ok mælti, “Nú viltu mér bana!  Gør eigi þetta, svá sem ek hefi nú vel um buizk áðr, en þú hefir nú rótat í sundr skjaldborg minni, ok hafða ek nú svá gört hana háva útan at mér, at hon hefir hlíft mér við öllum höggum ykkar, svá at engi högg hafa komit á mik lengi, en ekki var hon enn svá búin sem ek ætlaða hon skyldi verða.”

          Böðvarr went there and asked who was there in the pile of bones. Then he was answered and rather shyly: “I’m called Höttr, my dear fellow.” Why are you here,” said Böðvarr, “or what are you doing?” Höttr said, "I’m building myself a shield-fortress, my dear fellow.” Böðvarr grabbed him and pulled him up from the pile of bones. Höttr then spoke properly and said, “Now you will be my death! This wasn’t built now, as well as I had previously prepared it, but you have now thrown asunder my shield-fortress, and I would have now built it so high around me, that it would have sheltered me from all your blows, so that no blow would reach me for a long time, but it was not yet as built-up as I intended it should be."

          Kveðja,

          Dan
           

          Sarah Bowen wrote:

          Sæl Daniel, Jed, Laurel, Simon, Thomas and anyone else who wants to join in! Simon asked for some background information on the tale, so here's some info taken from the introduction to Byock's translation... It is one of the major Scandinavian legendary tales and belongs to the mythic-heroic sagas known as fornaldar sagas.  These tell of events which are supposed to have occurred long before the settlement of Iceland. Hrolf's saga was written in the 14th century and is similar to the English poem Beowulf.  Both draw on a common tradition of storytelling, recounting events that are supposed to taken place in the 5th or 6th century in Denmark.  Both Beowulf and Hrolf's saga provides information about a powerful champion (Beowulf and Bodvar) whose bearlike character may reflect the distant memory of early cultic practices.   If you want to know how Bodvar came to be known as Bjarki, you'll have to read the first 23 chapters of the saga!!!Anyway, here are lines 8-20 from Gordon's reader in the attachment. Have fun! Sarah.



          A Norse funny farm, overrun by smart people.

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          University of Sydney NSW 2006 Australia

          "Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe." H. G. Wells (1866 - 1946)
           

        • Laurel Bradshaw
          Hi. Some tough bits here! I still haven t studied verbs at all, although it s fairly easy to identify the dictionary form at least. I will just list the
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 23, 2003
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            Hi.  Some tough bits here!  I still haven't studied verbs at all, although it's fairly easy to identify the dictionary form at least.  I will just list the vocabulary I have questions about, or want verified.

            Laurel

            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            8. Bơðvarr gengr þangat til ok spyrr hverr þar væri í beinahrúgunni.

            gengr = from ganga.  Gordon has "ganga til" as "go (up) to, go forward."  Is gengr present tense?

            spyrr = from spyrja, to ask.  Present tense again?

            vaeri = pa. subj. of vera, to be

            beinahrúgunni = f.s.Dat. + def. art. (with í)

            BQðvarr-goes-thither-to-and-asks-who-there-might be-in-the pile of bones

            Bodvar went over there up to (it) (or just Bodvar went over there) and asked who was there in the pile of bones.

            -------------------------------

            9. Þá var honum svarat ok heldr óframliga: “Hơttr heiti ek, bokki sæll.” 

            var = from vera, past tense?

            honum = m. s. Dat., to him

            svarat = n.s. Acc. of svar + def. art., the answer

            heiti = from heita, be called, be named

            bokki saell = Gordon has "good sir".  saell = fortunate or happy.  bokki = buck or fellow.  We have the word buck in English, which means something like "a virile young man."  Then there is the slang term "bucko", which is a little more "in your face."  I need some further context here.  Is HQttr being deferential or disrespectful?  "heldr óframliga" and Gordon's translation might suggest deferential, BUT.....BQðvarr's reaction suggests it is more "in your face" so that's how I'm going to take it.  BQðvarr does seem to be "strutting his stuff" a bit.  Also I think there is deliberate contrast here between BQðvarr's "fortunate" circumstances, and HQttr's miserable state which doesn't translate very well. 

            Then - was - to him - the answer - and - rather - timidly - HQttr - am called - I - bucko - lucky

            Then he got his answer, rather timidly :  "I am called Hood, dear bucko."

            -------------------------------

            10. "Hví ertu hér,” segir Bơðvarr, “eða hvat gørir þú?” 

            segir = from segja, present tense

            eða = and, or, but

            gørir = from gøra, to make, build, do

            Why - are you - here - says - BQðvarr - and - what - are doing - you

            "Why are you here," said Bodvar, "and what are you doing?"

            ---------------------------------- 

            11. Hơttr segir, “Ek gøri mér skjaldborg, bokki sæll.” 

            mér = 1 s. Dat., to me, or perhaps for me/myself in this case

            skjaldborg = shieldwall.  I don't have any problem using this term.  I know what a shieldwall is, and the imagery is rather hilarious.  But an alternative translation might be simply "barricade."

            HQttr - says - I - am making/building - (for) me - a shieldwall - bucko - lucky

            Hood said, "I am building myself a barricade, dear bucko."

            ------------------------------------

            12. Bơðvarr sagði, “Vesall ertu þinnar skjaldborgar!” 

             sagði = pa. t. of segja

            vesall = wretched, miserable (an exclamation of impatience according to Gordon)

            þinnar skjaldborgar = f. s. Gen., of your shieldwall.  Why genitive?  This makes an awkward literal translation.  Could we say "with" instead of "of?"

            BQðvarr - said - miserable - are you - (with) your shieldwall

            Bodvar said, "You and your miserable shieldwall!"

            --------------------------------

            13. Bơðvarr þrífr til hans ok hnykkir honum upp ór beinahrúgunni. 

            þrífr til = to lay hold (of)

            hans = m.s. Gen., of him

            hnykkir = from hnykkja, to pull violently

            BQðvarr - lays hold - of him - and - pulls violently - him - up - out of - the pile of bones

            Bodvar grabbed him and yanked him up out of the pile of bones.

            ------------------------------- 

            14. Hơttr kvað þá hátt við ok mælti, “Nú viltu mér bana!

            kvað = from kveða, to say, declare

            hátt = n. from hár (as adv.), loudly

            við = in reply

            maelti = from maela, to speak, declare

            viltu = from vilja + tu, to will, wish

            HQttr - shouted - then - loudly - and - saying - now - you wish - me - to kill

            Hood then shouted loudly, declaring, "Now you wish to kill me! 

            15. Gør eigi þetta, svá sem ek hefi nú vel um buizk áðr,

            svá sem = now that

            hefi = from hafa

            um búisk = from búa, to prepare.  With "um" = to arrange, set up.  sk = reflexive ending?

            Do - not - this - now - that - I - have - now - well - set up - before

            Don't do this, when I have just now set up (things) so well,

            ----------------------------------- 

            16. en þú hefir nú rótat í sundr skjaldborg minni,

            rótat = from róta, to throw into disorder, upset

            í sundr = asunder

            but - you - have - now - thrown - asunder - shieldwall - mine

            but you have now broken apart my barricade,

            -----------------------------

            17. ok hafða ek nú svá gơrt hana háva útan at mér,

            hafða = from hafa, past tense

            gQrt = from gøra

            háva = is this a typo for "hára", high???

            útan = from without

            at = towards/against

            útan at = maybe "around"??

            and - had - I - now - so/thus - built - it - high - around - me

            and I had built it high around me just so,

            ----------------------------

            18a. at hon hefir hlíft mér við ơllum hơggum ykkar,

            at = conj. "so that"

            hlíft = from hlífa, to shelter, protect

            ykkar = dual form.  I don't understand this.  He's talking to BQðvarr, and there's only one of him!

            so that - it - has - protected - me - against - all - blows - of you two

            so that it has protected me from all your blows,

            ------------------------------

            18b. svá at engi hơgg hafa komit á mik lengi,

            svá at = so that

            komit = from koma.  With á = impers., comes upon

            so - that - no - blow - has - come - upon - me - a long time

            (and) so that no blow has landed on me for a long time,

            --------------------------------

            19. en ekki var hon enn svá búin sem ek ætlaða hon skyldi verða.”

            aetlaða = from aetla, to think, consider, expect, intend

            skyldi = from skulu, shall, must, ought

            verða = to happen, take place

            but - nothing - was - it - moreover - as - prepared - as - I - intended - it - should - become

            but even so it wasn't as prepared as I intended it would become.

          • Sarah Bowen
            Sæl Laurel! For someone who hasn t studied verbs, you ve done remarkably well again! Assume the answers to your questions are all yes if I don t comment on
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 29, 2003
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              Sæl Laurel!
               
              For someone who hasn't studied verbs, you've done remarkably well again!
               
              Assume the answers to your questions are all 'yes' if I don't comment on them, ok?
               
              Here goes...
              svarat = n.s. Acc. of svar + def. art., the answer
              not quite, svarat is the past participle, so it means "he was answered".
               
              I need some further context here.  Is HQttr being deferential or disrespectful?  "heldr óframliga" and Gordon's translation might suggest deferential, BUT.....BQðvarr's reaction suggests it is more "in your face" so that's how I'm going to take it.  BQðvarr does seem to be "strutting his stuff" a bit.  Also I think there is deliberate contrast here between BQðvarr's "fortunate" circumstances, and HQttr's miserable state which doesn't translate very well. 
               
              I see what you mean about Hottr being a bit deferential but but at the same time having some guts about him.  At the end, of course, he does become a hero himself, so that would ring true - he's got those qualities, they just need to be unearthed!  I agree with you that there is a contrast between them which doesn't translate well.  I don't think there are any definitive answers.
               
              I know what a shieldwall is, and the imagery is rather hilarious.  But an alternative translation might be simply "barricade."
              I think that's a brilliant solution! 
               

              þinnar skjaldborgar = f. s. Gen., of your shieldwall.  Why genitive?  This makes an awkward literal translation.  Could we say "with" instead of "of?"

              See my post 23rd April.
               
              háva = is this a typo for "hára", high???
               
               No, it's the fem acc sing of hár, agreeing with "hana".
               
               ykkar = dual form.  I don't understand this.  He's talking to BQðvarr, and there's only one of him!
              Yes, this does seem strange!  Altough he´s talking to Bodvar, he´s referring to Bodvar and all the other retainers as a whole.  So possibly he is categorising Bodvar as one entity and all the other retainers as the second entity - therefore he uses the dual.  Or an alternative explanation we were given was that this is a modern Icelandic usage, where the originally dual 1st and 2nd person forms are used to denote all numbers higher than one.
               
              Hope that is helpful Laurel.
              Kveðja,
               
              Sarah.                              
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2003 7:29 PM
              Subject: Re: [norse_course] Bodvar Bjarki lines 8-20

              Hi.  Some tough bits here!  I still haven't studied verbs at all, although it's fairly easy to identify the dictionary form at least.  I will just list the vocabulary I have questions about, or want verified.

              Laurel

              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              8. Bơðvarr gengr þangat til ok spyrr hverr þar væri í beinahrúgunni.

              gengr = from ganga.  Gordon has "ganga til" as "go (up) to, go forward."  Is gengr present tense?

              spyrr = from spyrja, to ask.  Present tense again?

              vaeri = pa. subj. of vera, to be

              beinahrúgunni = f.s.Dat. + def. art. (with í)

              BQðvarr-goes-thither-to-and-asks-who-there-might be-in-the pile of bones

              Bodvar went over there up to (it) (or just Bodvar went over there) and asked who was there in the pile of bones.

              -------------------------------

              9. Þá var honum svarat ok heldr óframliga: “Hơttr heiti ek, bokki sæll.” 

              var = from vera, past tense?

              honum = m. s. Dat., to him

              svarat = n.s. Acc. of svar + def. art., the answer

              heiti = from heita, be called, be named

              bokki saell = Gordon has "good sir".  saell = fortunate or happy.  bokki = buck or fellow.  We have the word buck in English, which means something like "a virile young man."  Then there is the slang term "bucko", which is a little more "in your face."  I need some further context here.  Is HQttr being deferential or disrespectful?  "heldr óframliga" and Gordon's translation might suggest deferential, BUT.....BQðvarr's reaction suggests it is more "in your face" so that's how I'm going to take it.  BQðvarr does seem to be "strutting his stuff" a bit.  Also I think there is deliberate contrast here between BQðvarr's "fortunate" circumstances, and HQttr's miserable state which doesn't translate very well. 

              Then - was - to him - the answer - and - rather - timidly - HQttr - am called - I - bucko - lucky

              Then he got his answer, rather timidly :  "I am called Hood, dear bucko."

              -------------------------------

              10. "Hví ertu hér,” segir Bơðvarr, “eða hvat gørir þú?” 

              segir = from segja, present tense

              eða = and, or, but

              gørir = from gøra, to make, build, do

              Why - are you - here - says - BQðvarr - and - what - are doing - you

              "Why are you here," said Bodvar, "and what are you doing?"

              ---------------------------------- 

              11. Hơttr segir, “Ek gøri mér skjaldborg, bokki sæll.” 

              mér = 1 s. Dat., to me, or perhaps for me/myself in this case

              skjaldborg = shieldwall.  I don't have any problem using this term.  I know what a shieldwall is, and the imagery is rather hilarious.  But an alternative translation might be simply "barricade."

              HQttr - says - I - am making/building - (for) me - a shieldwall - bucko - lucky

              Hood said, "I am building myself a barricade, dear bucko."

              ------------------------------------

              12. Bơðvarr sagði, “Vesall ertu þinnar skjaldborgar!” 

               sagði = pa. t. of segja

              vesall = wretched, miserable (an exclamation of impatience according to Gordon)

              þinnar skjaldborgar = f. s. Gen., of your shieldwall.  Why genitive?  This makes an awkward literal translation.  Could we say "with" instead of "of?"

              BQðvarr - said - miserable - are you - (with) your shieldwall

              Bodvar said, "You and your miserable shieldwall!"

              --------------------------------

              13. Bơðvarr þrífr til hans ok hnykkir honum upp ór beinahrúgunni. 

              þrífr til = to lay hold (of)

              hans = m.s. Gen., of him

              hnykkir = from hnykkja, to pull violently

              BQðvarr - lays hold - of him - and - pulls violently - him - up - out of - the pile of bones

              Bodvar grabbed him and yanked him up out of the pile of bones.

              ------------------------------- 

              14. Hơttr kvað þá hátt við ok mælti, “Nú viltu mér bana!

              kvað = from kveða, to say, declare

              hátt = n. from hár (as adv.), loudly

              við = in reply

              maelti = from maela, to speak, declare

              viltu = from vilja + tu, to will, wish

              HQttr - shouted - then - loudly - and - saying - now - you wish - me - to kill

              Hood then shouted loudly, declaring, "Now you wish to kill me! 

              15. Gør eigi þetta, svá sem ek hefi nú vel um buizk áðr,

              svá sem = now that

              hefi = from hafa

              um búisk = from búa, to prepare.  With "um" = to arrange, set up.  sk = reflexive ending?

              Do - not - this - now - that - I - have - now - well - set up - before

              Don't do this, when I have just now set up (things) so well,

              ----------------------------------- 

              16. en þú hefir nú rótat í sundr skjaldborg minni,

              rótat = from róta, to throw into disorder, upset

              í sundr = asunder

              but - you - have - now - thrown - asunder - shieldwall - mine

              but you have now broken apart my barricade,

              -----------------------------

              17. ok hafða ek nú svá gơrt hana háva útan at mér,

              hafða = from hafa, past tense

              gQrt = from gøra

              háva = is this a typo for "hára", high???

              útan = from without

              at = towards/against

              útan at = maybe "around"??

              and - had - I - now - so/thus - built - it - high - around - me

              and I had built it high around me just so,

              ----------------------------

              18a. at hon hefir hlíft mér við ơllum hơggum ykkar,

              at = conj. "so that"

              hlíft = from hlífa, to shelter, protect

              ykkar = dual form.  I don't understand this.  He's talking to BQðvarr, and there's only one of him!

              so that - it - has - protected - me - against - all - blows - of you two

              so that it has protected me from all your blows,

              ------------------------------

              18b. svá at engi hơgg hafa komit á mik lengi,

              svá at = so that

              komit = from koma.  With á = impers., comes upon

              so - that - no - blow - has - come - upon - me - a long time

              (and) so that no blow has landed on me for a long time,

              --------------------------------

              19. en ekki var hon enn svá búin sem ek ætlaða hon skyldi verða.”

              aetlaða = from aetla, to think, consider, expect, intend

              skyldi = from skulu, shall, must, ought

              verða = to happen, take place

              but - nothing - was - it - moreover - as - prepared - as - I - intended - it - should - become

              but even so it wasn't as prepared as I intended it would become.



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