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Re: [norse_course] Re: ylgr

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  • Thomas Lindblom
    Thanks a lot for your help, now i can finally continue reading.(he he) Thomas To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 31, 2002
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       Thanks a lot for your help, now i can finally continue reading.(he he)

      Thomas

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    • hveenegaard
      YLGR. A random search for the word YLGR in poetry yielded the following examples, which might be of interest to those members who like to whet their linguistic
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 31, 2002
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        YLGR.

        A random search for the word YLGR in poetry yielded the following
        examples, which might be of interest to those members who like to
        whet their linguistic skills:

        1.

        In the Codex Upsaliensis of Snorri's "Poetic Diction", we find the
        following half-stanza attributed to Einarr Skúlason:

        Leyg rýðr ætt á ægi
        Óláfs skipa sólar
        (YLGR brunar hvatt) ins helga
        (hrægjörn í spor örnum).

        Suggested reading:

        Ætt Óláfs ins helga = The kinsman of St. Olaf
        rýðr = reddens, smears with red (blood)
        leyg sólar skipa = flame of sun of ships (= the sword)
        á ægi = at sea ;
        hrægjörn ylgr = the corpse-greedy she-wolf
        brunar hvatt = rushes forward quickly
        í spor örnum = in the eagles' tracks (immediately after the eagles)

        All of which is normal, except for the slightly puzzling
        fact that the first part seems to refer to a battle at
        sea, while the second part refers to a land-battle.

        2.

        The carrion-animals, raven, eagle, and wolf, are frequent
        motifs in battle-poetry. Hundreds of variants of the basic
        formula (animal eats corpse) are found in the poetic corpus.
        Here are four "one-liners" from a half-stanza by Óttarr the
        Black:

        Örn drekkr undarn,
        YLGR fær af hræm sylg,
        opt rýðr ulfr kjöpt,
        ari getr verð þar.

        Roughly:

        The eagle drinks breakfast,
        the she-wolf gets a sip from corpses,
        frequently the wolf stains his jaws red,
        the eagle finds his dinner there.

        3.

        A valiant warrior was properly described in poetry
        as "feeder of the wolf", "provider of the raven's
        yule-feast", or as in these lines from Sighvatr
        Þórðarson's Víkingarvísur:

        Tönn rauð tolfta sinni
        tírfylgjandi ylgjar.

        Tírfylgjandi = The glory-follower
        rauð tönn YLGJAR = reddened the she-wolf's tooth
        tolfta sinni = for the twelfth time.

        4.

        The corpse itself was called "raven's dinner", or some
        such equivalent, as in the following half-stanza, quoted
        by Snorri from Einar skálaglamm's famous Vellekla:

        Fjallvönðum gaf fylli,
        fullr varð, - en spjör gullu -
        herstefnandi hröfnum,
        hrafn á ylgjar tafni.

        Which must be read:

        Herstefnandi gaf fylli = The army-leader gave (their) fill
        fjallvönðum hröfnum = to the mountain-accustomed ravens,
        (en spjör gullu) = (and the spears resounded) ;
        hrafn varð fullr = the raven became full (gorged himself)
        á YLGJAR tafni = on the she-wolf's catch (corpses).

        Many more examples can be provided, but I'm sure the above
        will do for the time being. Any language-related questions
        will be answered if asked.

        Regards
        Pelle
      • Haukur Thorgeirsson
        YLGR - She-wolf This is a favorite word among linguists. It has cognates all over the Indo-European family.
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 1, 2002
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          YLGR - She-wolf

          This is a favorite word among linguists. It has cognates
          all over the Indo-European family.

          http://indoeuro.bizland.com/project/phonetics/word56.html

          Kveðja,
          Haukur
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