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Re: Oðni (was Re: [norse_course] Havamal)

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  • Haukur Thorgeirsson
    First of all the name of the Allfather is Óðinn - with a long o . :-) ... True. This is in the incomplete lesson 8. But the discussion there is short and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 1, 2002
      First of all the name of the Allfather is Óðinn - with a long 'o'. :-)


      > It's not really an exception, but one of those general rules that modify
      > everything with a certain pattern. I think it may even be covered in one
      > of the lessons for this course, even though it's not complete. (I don't
      > remember where I encountered it.)

      True. This is in the incomplete lesson 8. But the discussion there is
      short and (as I read it now) seems partly misleading.


      > First of all, Oðinn (nominative singular) is stem Oðin + ending -n.
      > The -n replaces -r because of a rule about stems ending in -n, -l, -s.

      Correct.


      > So the dative would seem to be Oðini. Except that hits another rule,
      > which as a non-specialist I just see as "patterns like '-ðini' sound awkward".

      That's not a bad rule. Havard worded it a more formal way.

      Here are some singular declensions (nom. acc. dat. gen.):

      hamarr (hammer)
      hamar
      hamri
      hamars

      jöfurr (lord)
      jöfur
      jöfri
      jöfurs

      jökull (glacier)
      jökul
      jökli
      jökuls

      Hamall (a proper name)
      Hamal
      Hamli
      Hamals

      spegill (mirror)
      spegil
      spegli
      spegils

      himinn (sky, heaven)
      himin
      himni
      himins

      jötunn (giant)
      jötun
      jötni
      jötuns

      aftann (evening)
      aftan
      aftni
      aftans

      As for the lines from Hávamál:

      geiri undaðr [with] a spear wounded
      ok gefinn Óðni and given [to] Óðinn
      sjálfr mér sjálfum myself [to] me myself

      I put within brackets the meaning denoted by the datives.

      geiri: instrumental dative (as in latin: ablativus instrumentalis)
      Óðni: dative proper
      mér: dative proper
      sjálfum: dative proper

      What I mean here by 'dative proper' is that this dative denotes
      someone on the receiving end of 'gefa; give'. I think the latin word
      'dativus' is derived from the verb 'do' which means 'I give'. The Icelandic
      name of the case is 'þágufall; acceptance case'. Remember, though, that
      the Icelandic dative plays the roles of both the latin dative and the
      latin ablative.

      Kveðja,
      Haukur
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