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Laxdaela saga 70 part 1--Elliot's translation

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  • elliot.holland@ymail.com
    Here┤s my translation. Sorry about the lateness. I┤ve been at my parents┤ house this week for the fourth, whose WIFI is not working. òHann var ma≡ur
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 9, 2013
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      Here´s my translation. Sorry about the lateness. I´ve been at my parents´ house this week for the fourth, whose WIFI is not working.

      •Hann var maður héraðríkur og málamaður mikill.
      --He (nom) was (a) man (nom. modern spelling) district-powerful (powerful in his district mas. nom. compar.) and a great (no decl) lawyer (mála-fylgjumaðr).
      --He was a powerful man in his district and a great lawyer.

      •Þorkell sat vel bæ sinn.
      --Thorkell sat (sitja 3. past) well by himself.
      --Thorkell kept his farm in (good) order.

      •Þau Þorkell og Guðrún áttu son. Sá er nefndur Gellir. Hann var snemma hinn
      efnilegasti.
      --They (n. nom) Thorkell and Gudhrun had (a) son (acc.). That (loc. mas. nom.), he (conj. masc. nom.) was named (past part or adjectiveÞ) Gellir. He was quickly promising here/there/that? dem. pro. (masc nom or acc.
      --They, Thorkell and Gudhrun had a son, who was named Gellir. He was quickly promising.

      •Þorleikur bróðir hans var að Helgafelli.
      --Thorleik (name? Nom.) brother (nom) of him was to on Helgafelli.
      Thorleikur´s brother was at Helgafelli.

      •Vel var Þorkatli til stjúpbarna sinna. Guðrún unni Bolla mest allra barna sinna.
      Bolli var nú sextán vetra en Þorleikur tuttugu.
      --Well was Thorkatli to stepchild his (ply). Gudhrun granted Bolla most of all of his children. To Bolli was now sixteen winter but twenty.
      --Thorkatli was good to his stepchildren. Gudhrun granted Bolla most of his children. He had 16 children in winter, but now twenty.
    • Brian M. Scott
      At 4:43:13 PM on Tuesday, July 9, 2013, ... If by ‘compar.’ you mean ‘comparative’, no: it’s just the nom. sing. masc. of the positive (base) form of
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 10, 2013
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        At 4:43:13 PM on Tuesday, July 9, 2013,
        elliot.holland@... wrote:

        > •Hann var maður héraðríkur og málamaður mikill.

        > --He (nom) was (a) man (nom. modern spelling)
        > district-powerful (powerful in his district mas. nom.
        > compar.) and a great (no decl) lawyer (mála-fylgjumaðr).

        If by ‘compar.’ you mean ‘comparative’, no: it’s just the
        nom. sing. masc. of the positive (base) form of the
        adjective. <Mikill> is also inflected: it’s the nom. sing.
        masc. of the strong adjective declension.

        > --He was a powerful man in his district and a great
        > lawyer.

        Looks good.

        > •Þau Þorkell og Guðrún áttu son. Sá er nefndur Gellir.
        > Hann var snemma hinn efnilegasti.

        > --They (n. nom) Thorkell and Gudhrun had (a) son (acc.).
        > That (loc. mas. nom.), he (conj. masc. nom.) was named
        > (past part or adjectiveÞ) Gellir. He was quickly promising
        > here/there/that? dem. pro. (masc nom or acc.

        <Sá> is a demonstrative pronoun, 'he, that one (masc.)';
        <er> is 3rd sing. pres. indic. of <vera>, and <nefndur> is
        the nom. sing. masc. of the past participle.

        <Snemma> can be either 'quickly, soon' or 'early'. Here I’m
        inclined to go with the latter, though there really isn’t
        much difference in sense in this case. <Efnilegasti> 'most
        promising' is the nom. sing. masc. weak adjective inflection
        of the superlative of <efnilegur>; <-ast-> is the
        superlative suffix. The weak declension is required with
        the determiner <hinn> 'the' (nom. sing. masc.). <Hinn
        efnilegasti> is a noun phrase without the noun: 'the most
        promising ...', where the ellipsis can reasonably be filled
        in quite a few different ways without significantly
        affecting the meaning.

        > --They, Thorkell and Gudhrun had a son, who was named
        > Gellir. He was quickly promising.

        They, Þorkel and Guðrún, had a son. He was named Gellir.
        [From] early [on] he was the most promising [of youngsters].

        > •Þorleikur bróðir hans var að Helgafelli.

        > --Thorleik (name? Nom.) brother (nom) of him was to on
        > Helgafelli.

        > --Thorleikur´s brother was at Helgafelli.

        As you said, <Þorleikur> is nominative, not genitive, so it
        can’t be 'Þorleik’s brother'; <bróðir hans> is an appositive
        further describing Þorleik, 'Þorleik his brother' (where
        'his' refers to Bolli Bollason, though this isn’t evident
        without the preceding sentence of the full text). <Var> is
        literally 'was', but in this context 'stayed' captures the
        intended sense better. (This usage occurs quite often.)

        > •Vel var Þorkatli til stjúpbarna sinna. Guðrún unni Bolla
        > mest allra barna sinna. Bolli var nú sextán vetra en
        > Þorleikur tuttugu.

        > --Well was Thorkatli to stepchild his (ply). Gudhrun
        > granted Bolla most of all of his children. To Bolli was
        > now sixteen winter but twenty.

        <Þorkatli> is the dative of <Þorkell>. This is an
        impersonal construction, with no expressed grammatical
        subject: ‘[It] was well with Þorkel towards his
        stepchildren’, i.e., ‘Þorkel was well-disposed towards his
        stepchildren’. <Barna> is the genitive plural of <barn> 'a
        child', the gen. being required after <til>; the <-a>
        nominal inflection has a few other uses, but all gen.
        plurals have it.

        <Unni> is from <unna> Z2 'to love' (with the dative of the
        person loved), the 3rd sing. past indic. 'loved'. <Bolla>
        is therefore a dative, though since <Bolli> is a masc.
        n-stem, it has <Bolla> in the gen. and acc. as well.
        <Guðrún> is a feminine name.

        <Bolli> is nom., not dat.: it’s a masc. n-stem, what Zoëga
        (and many others) call a weak masculine noun. <Vetra> is
        the gen. plur. of <vetr>, which is indeed 'winter', but
        which is also 'year' when ages are being given: one’s age
        was counted in winters. It’s literally ‘Bolli was now
        sixteen of winters’, but the straightforward translation is
        ‘Bolli was now sixteen years old’. (The ON sometimes adds
        the ‘old’: it could just as well have been <Bolli var nú
        sextán vetra gamall>.) At my age it gets a little more
        complicated: Ek er fimm vetr hins sjaunda tigar. The
        conjunction <en> here is best translated 'and': it has no
        real adversative sense.

        > --Thorkatli was good to his stepchildren. Gudhrun granted
        > Bolla most of his children. He had 16 children in winter,
        > but now twenty.

        Þorkel was well-disposed towards his stepchildren. Guðrún
        loved Bolli most of all her children. Bolli was now sixteen
        years [old], and Þorleik twenty.

        Brian
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