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Re: [norse_course] Names

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  • Ljóma Austmaðr
    what about declensions? or is this in a declension other than strong masculine that i don t know... ... what about declensions? or is this in a declension
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 13 6:23 AM
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      what about declensions? or is this in a declension other than strong masculine that i don't know...
      On Feb 12, 2011, at 4:39 PM, Brian M. Scott wrote:

       

      At 9:29:19 PM on Tuesday, February 8, 2011, Ljóma Austmaðr
      wrote:

      > I created my name from a translation of what my name
      > means. The verb I want is to shine, or Ljóma. The question
      > is, would it be Ljómr to make it a noun (a name)? Also, is
      > Ljóma the best option for a translation?

      If there were such a name, <Ljóma> would be feminine; the
      corresponding masculine name, if it existed, would be
      <Ljómi>. In fact there is a noun <ljómi> 'flash of light,
      radiance' whose use as a byname is attested in 'Þórsteins
      þáttr uxafóts':

      Erlingr átti þann son, (er) Ívarr hét, allra manna vænstr,
      þeira (er) uppi váru á Hórðalandi; því var hann kallaðr
      Ívarr ljómi.

      Erling had that son named Ívar, fairest to behold of all
      those men who were up in Hórðaland; for that reason he was
      called Ívar 'radiance'.

      'Íslendinga saga' mentions an Icelander killed in 1255 who
      bore the same byname:

      Eirekr hét Austfirzkr maðr, er ljómi var kallaðr.

      There was a man from the east fjords named Eirek, who was
      called 'radiance'.

      And there are one or two other instances.

      Many old descriptive bynames were later used as ordinary
      given names, e.g. <hjalti> 'halt, lame'. There does not
      appear to be any evidence that <ljómi> was so used, but as
      hypothetical names go it's not unreasonable.

      Brian


    • jeffery craft
      i wonder what the translation of jeffery craft would be from english in to old norse Consider your origin, you were not born to live like brutes, but to
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 13 2:37 PM
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        i wonder what the translation of jeffery craft would be from english in to old norse

        "Consider your origin, you were not born to live like brutes, but to follow virtue and knowledge.”
         
                                                                                                                                        Dante Alighieri 
         
        Ti. Aurelius Trio


        --- On Sun, 2/13/11, Ljóma Austmaðr <ljoma.austmadr@...> wrote:

        From: Ljóma Austmaðr <ljoma.austmadr@...>
        Subject: Re: [norse_course] Names
        To: norse_course@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:23 AM

         
        what about declensions? or is this in a declension other than strong masculine that i don't know...
        On Feb 12, 2011, at 4:39 PM, Brian M. Scott wrote:

         
        At 9:29:19 PM on Tuesday, February 8, 2011, Ljóma Austmaðr
        wrote:

        > I created my name from a translation of what my name
        > means. The verb I want is to shine, or Ljóma. The question
        > is, would it be Ljómr to make it a noun (a name)? Also, is
        > Ljóma the best option for a translation?

        If there were such a name, <Ljóma> would be feminine; the
        corresponding masculine name, if it existed, would be
        <Ljómi>. In fact there is a noun <ljómi> 'flash of light,
        radiance' whose use as a byname is attested in 'Þórsteins
        þáttr uxafóts':

        Erlingr átti þann son, (er) Ívarr hét, allra manna vænstr,
        þeira (er) uppi váru á Hórðalandi; því var hann kallaðr
        Ívarr ljómi.

        Erling had that son named Ívar, fairest to behold of all
        those men who were up in Hórðaland; for that reason he was
        called Ívar 'radiance'.

        'Íslendinga saga' mentions an Icelander killed in 1255 who
        bore the same byname:

        Eirekr hét Austfirzkr maðr, er ljómi var kallaðr.

        There was a man from the east fjords named Eirek, who was
        called 'radiance'.

        And there are one or two other instances.

        Many old descriptive bynames were later used as ordinary
        given names, e.g. <hjalti> 'halt, lame'. There does not
        appear to be any evidence that <ljómi> was so used, but as
        hypothetical names go it's not unreasonable.

        Brian



      • 600cell@oe.eclipse.co.uk
        ... is declined like here [ http://norse.ulver.com/dct/zoega/substantives.html#b ]. Singular nominative: ljómi oblique (accusative, genitive,
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 13 3:31 PM
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          --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, Ljóma Austmaðr <ljoma.austmadr@...> wrote:
          >
          > what about declensions? or is this in a declension other than strong masculine that i don't know...

          <ljómi> is declined like <tími> here [ http://norse.ulver.com/dct/zoega/substantives.html#b ].

          Singular

          nominative: ljómi
          oblique (accusative, genitive, dative): ljóma


          Plural

          nominative: ljómar
          accusative: ljóma
          genitive: ljóma
          dative: ljómum
        • 600cell@oe.eclipse.co.uk
          ... The first element of Jeffery may be from Old High German district (Modern German ), or perhaps spear . Another suggestion connects it
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 13 4:17 PM
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            --- In norse_course@yahoogroups.com, jeffery craft <warbuff_4@...> wrote:
            >
            > i wonder what the translation of jeffery craft would be from english in to old norse

            The first element of Jeffery may be from Old High German <gewi> "district" (Modern German <Gau>), or perhaps <ger> "spear". Another suggestion connects it to some continental Germanic cognate of Old English <gid> "speech, verse", Old Norse <geð> "mind, inclination" (Forssner: Continental-Germanic personal names in England in Old and Middle English times, p. 102 [ http://www.archive.org/details/continentalgerma00forsuoft ]). Forssner also mentions a tendency to confuse this name with God(e)frid (pp. 102, 118-119), whose first element corresponds to Old Norse <goð> or <guð>. The second element appears in Old Norse names as <frøðr> or <freðr>, meaning "peace".

            I don't know of Old Norse personal names beginning with all of these first elements, but <Goðfreðr> is attested in Íslendinga saga, and here [ http://baekur.is/is/bok/000197700/1/464/Islenzkt_fornbrefasafn__sem_Bindi_1_Bls_464 ] seems to be a Modern Icelandic substitution of Goðfreðr for Goffridus, so that might be the way to go. Is this a reference to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_of_Vend%C3%B4me ?

            The Old Norse cognate of English <craft>, Modern German <kraft>, is

            kraptr (-s, -ar), m. (1) might, strength, power; (2) virtue; (3) superhuman being, angel.

            Although family names weren't used as in English, a nickname such as this could be placed after the main name.
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