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Re: [norse_course] Laxdaela Saga 22 Part 2 -- Rob's Translation

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  • Brian M. Scott
    ... It definitely isn t the idiom: is a dative, and is accusative. It appears to me that is an example of
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 16, 2010
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      > Þá svarar konungur: "Eigi skal þetta gera óvinveitt við
      > þig Ólafur.

      > Then (the) king answers: "This will not prevent you
      > un-agreeably, Olaf. (Z. gøra 13 - g. við e-u, to prevent)

      > Then (the) king answers, "I shall not behave disagreeably
      > with you, Olaf.

      > Then (the) king answers: “(I) shall not make this
      > unpleasant for you (I am inclined to think if anything the
      > model göra e-t við e-n fits better here), Ólafr.

      It definitely isn't the <g. við e-u> idiom: <e-u> is a
      dative, and <þig> is accusative. It appears to me that
      <gera óvinveitt> is an example of <gera> + accusative of an
      adjective, of which the following examples in Zoëga seem
      most useful: <g. sik reiðan> 'to take offence' and <g.
      skjót-kørit> 'to make a quick choice'. <Reiðan> is masc.
      acc. sing. of <reiðr> 'angry', and <g. sik reiðan> can be
      understood as 'make oneself angry'; <skjót-kørit> is the
      neut. acc. sing. of the adjectival past participle
      <skjót-kørinn> 'soon-chosen, quickly-chosen', and <g.
      skjót-kørit> can be understood as 'make [something] quickly
      chosen' and hence 'make a quick choice'. In this example
      the absence of an explicit object for <gera> almost turns
      the adjective into a noun: 'make [something] quick-chosen'
      is more or less 'make a quick choosing'. Then <við> can be
      simply 'towards (a person or thing), respecting, regarding'
      (Zoëga II(6)):

      Then [the] king answers: 'This shall not make
      unfriendliness for you, Ólaf.

      > En öngva önn né starf skaltu hafa fyrir um búnað þinn.

      > But neither work nor toil presses will you have before
      > concerning your preparations.

      > But no other trouble nor work shall you have before
      > concerning your preparations.

      > But no (neither) trouble nor toil shall you have for
      > (yourself?) concerning your preparations.

      It appears to me that <fyrir> is being used adverbially, so
      that <hafa fyrir> is 'have before, face': 'But you shall
      face neither toil nor labor in your preparations (for the
      voyage)'.

      > Það skip lætur konungur ferma með viði og búa með öllum
      > reiða.

      > (The) king has that ship loaded with lumber and made-ready
      > with all rigging.

      > (The) king has that ship loaded with wood and all rigging.

      > (The) king causes to load that ship with timber and to
      > prepares (the) rigging fully.

      <Með öllu> is 'wholly, completely', but here we have
      <öllum>. <Reiða> must be either gen., dat., or acc. sing.
      of masc. <reiði> or gen. or acc. plural; among these
      possibilities, the only one consistent with <öllum> is
      dative singular, so Rob has it right (except that to me
      'lumber' implies that it's been cut into planks or some
      other useful form, and I suspect that this would not have
      been the case). '[The] king has the ship loaded with
      wood/timber and made ready with all rigging.'

      > Vil eg eigi að þú siglir af Noregi þetta sumar svo að þú
      > sért annarra farþegi."

      > I don't want that you sail from Norway this summer so that
      > you are another passenger."

      > I do not want that you sail from Norway this summer so
      > that you be another passenger."

      > I do not want that you should-sail from Norway this summer
      > such that you should-be (the) passenger of another.’

      Rob & Grace: <annarra> can only be genitive plural (all
      genders), while <farþegi> can only be nom. sing., so <annara
      farþegi> can't be 'another passenger'. (That would be
      <annarr farþegi>.) It must instead be 'a passenger of
      others'.

      > Ólafur setur upp skip sitt en fé hans er norðan flutt.

      > Olaf draws his ship ashore, but his property is
      > from-the-north conveyed.

      > Olaf draws up his ship and his wealth is carried from the
      > north.

      > Ólafr lays up his ship but his property is conveyed
      > from-the-north (south).

      In other words, he's taking his wealth with him to
      Höskuldsstaðir. (Recall that Höskuld had to ride north to
      get to Hrútafjörð to meet him.)

      > Höskuldur fagnar blíðlega syni sínum.
      > Hoskuld welcomes with kindness his son.
      > Hoskuld receives his son happily.
      > Höskuldr receives friendlily his son.

      Rob's translation of <blíðlega> is the one suggested by
      Zoëga.

      > Bræður hans taka og með blíðu við honum og allir frændur
      > hans.

      > His brothers also receive him agreeably and all his
      > relatives.

      > His brother also receive him with happiness and all his
      > kinsmen.

      > His brothers also receive him with friendliness and all
      > his kinsmen.

      I'd go with 'friendliness' or 'kindness'.

      > Þó var flest um með þeim Bárði.

      > Yet (the welcome) was more (agreeable) from the Bardis.

      > Yet (the warmest reception) was most between them, (Olaf
      > and) Bard.

      > Nevertheless, (it, the reunion) was most pleasing to (see
      > under um, Z9) them, (he and) Bárð.

      'But the best of terms were between [Ólaf and] Bárð', i.e.,
      it was Bárð who received Ólaf most warmly. Compare <var
      fátt um með þeim> 'they were on cold terms'.

      > Þá var og kunnigt gert kynferði Ólafs, að hann var
      > dótturson Mýrkjartans Írakonungs.

      > Then (it) was also made known Olaf's kindred, that he was
      > the Irish-king Myrkartan's grandson.

      > Then was also made known of Olaf's kindred, that he was
      > the son of (the) daughter of Myrkjartan, King of Ireland.

      The sense is really 'king of the Irish': folks still thought
      more in terms of peoples than of countries.

      > Then was also made known Ólafr’s lineage, that he was the
      > grandson (daughter’s-son) of Mýrkjartan, (the) Irish-King.

      Brian
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