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Re: No response

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  • twobells2001
    Since several years ago when fire started being dispatched with ALL private ambulance calls. There has tended to be, in my opinion, a abuse of the fire and
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 26, 2007
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      Since several years ago when fire started being dispatched with ALL
      private ambulance calls. There has tended to be, in my opinion, a
      abuse of the fire and ambulance service. People are using it for a
      taxi service.

      Instead of going to the emergency room on your own, for non
      emergency issues when there could be a 3 hour wait, call an
      ambulance. You get to the hospital and get to "cut in line" in front
      of all the people in the waiting room. Unfortinately the fire depts
      get called out on these calls also. Many calls are non emergency
      issues, but add the kicker, oh and ugh, difficulty breathing, this
      gets the services moving.

      I recall one recent case of a "regular" who the first officer on
      scene reported "you can reduce code, I can see her through the
      window playing cards with a friend".

      Some years ago CDF had a policy of responding to life threating
      calls only. I think this is the policy our local fire services are
      going to have to adopt. The ambulance will still respond to ALL
      CALLS with their full time paid staff.
      Joe Lacey








      --- In norcalfire@yahoogroups.com, David Coursey <david@...> wrote:
      >
      > Out in the civilized world this is handled as "silent approach"
      in
      > which you run Code III until you get close to the incident and
      then
      > handle the last X of the run Code II. Where X is enough that the
      > neighbors don't notice the lights and siren as you come on-scene.
      >
      > While I agree that if you have an "emergency" you should expect
      Code
      > III, there are lots of people who find an ambulance embarrassing.
      I
      > think most of these are older folks who have needed the ambulance
      on
      > multiple occasions. I can appreciate their not wanted to wake up
      the
      > whole neighborhood at 2am because they have chest pain and the
      nitro
      > isn't working as well as it ought to.
      >
      > --
      > David Coursey
      >
      >
      > On Dec 26, 2007, at 12:19 AM, Evan Platt wrote:
      >
      > > That sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen. Woman calls 911 for
      > > medical. Asks for silent approach. FD Chief says no siren, no
      > > response. Woman has some reason for wanting a silent approach. FD
      > > doesn't respond. Woman dies.
      > >
      > > Family member comes by later that night to visit, finds woman
      DOA.
      > >
      > > Calls 911. "Oh.. uhhh... yeah, sorry about that, she called a few
      > > hours ago, but wanted the fire department to come with their
      siren
      > > off, but they Chief said no, so no one responded."
      > >
      > > At 03:48 PM 12/25/2007, twobells2001 wrote:
      > >
      > > >Christmas Eve, a tone out one of our local Fire Depts ( Del
      Norte
      > > >County)automatic with all medical calls. Person burned on back
      side
      > > >requested no lights, no siren.
      > > >
      > > >Chief responded to radio, no lights, no siren, no Fire Dept.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Erik
      ... ...While I agree that if you have an emergency you should expect Code III, there are lots of people who find an ambulance embarrassing. I think most of
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 2, 2008
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        --- In norcalfire@yahoogroups.com, David Coursey <david@...> wrote:
        >
        ...While I agree that if you have an "emergency" you should expect Code
        III, there are lots of people who find an ambulance embarrassing. I
        think most of these are older folks who have needed the ambulance on
        multiple occasions. I can appreciate their not wanted to wake up the
        whole neighborhood at 2am because they have chest pain and the nitro
        isn't working as well as it ought to...



        On medical calls at 2 am, I usually find that having a Type I fire
        engine, ambulance, and police car parked and idling in front of the
        incident address is enough to arouse the neighbors' interest.
      • David Coursey
        Yes, but they don t wake the whole neighborhood. I am not saying this is a good thing, I am merely reporting what I understand the facts to be based on my
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 2, 2008
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          Yes, but they don't wake the whole neighborhood. I am not saying this
          is a good thing, I am merely reporting what I understand the facts to
          be based on my experience as a reporter attending incidents and my
          wife's driving one of those noisy diesel ambulances. In reality, they
          don't generally run the siren once they enter a residential area
          anyway, except for a quick blast if required to get someone's attention.

          On Jan 2, 2008, at 12:27 AM, Erik wrote:

          > --- In norcalfire@yahoogroups.com, David Coursey <david@...> wrote:
          > >
          > ...While I agree that if you have an "emergency" you should expect
          > Code
          > III, there are lots of people who find an ambulance embarrassing. I
          > think most of these are older folks who have needed the ambulance on
          > multiple occasions. I can appreciate their not wanted to wake up the
          > whole neighborhood at 2am because they have chest pain and the nitro
          > isn't working as well as it ought to...
          >
          > On medical calls at 2 am, I usually find that having a Type I fire
          > engine, ambulance, and police car parked and idling in front of the
          > incident address is enough to arouse the neighbors' interest.
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Evan Platt
          I m with a volunteer fire department, and obviously we respond in our own personal vehicles generally right to the scene for the most part (at least once we ve
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 2, 2008
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            I'm with a volunteer fire department, and obviously we respond in our
            own personal vehicles generally right to the scene for the most part
            (at least once we've heard one of the engines responding).

            Since not all the volunteers respond on the air, often at a medical
            call, the IC or chief has often put out an additional page telling
            the volunteers to stop responding.

            Lots of people is good if you've got a person thrown from a horse,
            and you're getting ready to call in a air ambulance, but when you've
            got a elderly lady who fell out of bed, and maybe just needs some O2,
            and you've got 12 volunteers showing up... it's overkill :)

            At 12:27 AM 1/2/2008, Erik wrote:

            >On medical calls at 2 am, I usually find that having a Type I fire
            >engine, ambulance, and police car parked and idling in front of the
            >incident address is enough to arouse the neighbors' interest.
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