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Paclitaxel and Taxanes

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  • Janice and Ben
    Hello all, A subscriber on here heard from her oncologist about taxane trials and wondered if it was the same as paclitaxel. Below is an article I found from:
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 16, 1997
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      Hello all,
      A subscriber on here heard from her oncologist about taxane trials and
      wondered if it was the same as paclitaxel. Below is an article I found from:

      http://www.ucaccess.org/techs/techs/ott.92-082-0.00.html

      -Ben(KIA)
      ------8<--------8<---------8<-----
      Paclitacel and various taxanes are currently under investigation for their
      antitumor capacity and efficacy in treating various forms or cancer.
      Historically, paclitaxel has been extracted from the bark, leaves, and wood
      of Taxus brevifolia. Because of the relatively limited supply of paclitaxel
      from
      this source, alternate sources of paclitaxel and other taxanes is of great
      interest.

      University of California researchers have been successful in culturing
      haploid cells and their derivatives to produce paclitacel, related taxanes,
      and other metabolites that evolve from the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway.
      From cell culture lines of haploid origin, novel cell and tissue types, not
      found in nature, are regenerated and preprogrammed for the production of
      paclitaxel,
      taxanes, and other metabolites. The used of haploid lines is advantageous
      for several reasons. Use of haploid lines removes cells that contain lethal
      genes because all alleles are expressed. This technological clean-up
      removes the lethal growth-inhibiting factors inherent in sporophytic genotypes
      and provides superior cell lines for cell and tissue culture of taxanes.
      Additionally, haploid lines offer the opportunity for cell and tissue
      engineering through point mutations and genetic engineering. At
      the cellular level, large numbers of genetic variants generated by
      mutagenesis can be rapidly screened for desired characteristics. The
      potential for amplified production of paclitaxel and related products from
      cell lines derived from haploid cells also exists.

      The Regents of the University of California is seeking a licensee to bring
      this technology into commercial use. For further information please contact
      the agent listed below.

      INQUIRIES TO: Robert E. Fissell Bob.Fissell@...

      REFERENCE: UC Case 92-082
      RELATED CASES:
      PATENT STATUS: U.S. patent #5,547,866 issued August 20, 1996.

      University of California
      Office of Technology Transfer
      1320 Harbor Bay Parkway, Suite 150
      Alameda, CA 94502
      Phone: (510) 748-6600 Fax: (510) 748-6639
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