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kingbird fallout

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  • Harry Hooper
    Evening nflbirders,   Lynn and I made a short late afternoon trip to St. Marks NWR today.  As we approached East River Pool, several small flocks of Eastern
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 27, 2010
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      Evening nflbirders,
       
      Lynn and I made a short late afternoon trip to St. Marks NWR today.  As we approached East River Pool, several small flocks of Eastern Kingbirds were observed flying south eventually landing in the marsh at the south end of the pool and in the large hardwoods by the road. We enjoyed observing several aerial skirmishes amongst individual birds as these flocks approached and landed.  Overall, 27 birds were counted though with all the activity, there were probably additional birds present.   Migration of this species appears to be in progress.
       
      (On August 23, last year, Lynn and her mom recorded 30 Eastern Kingbirds scattered between East River Pool and the lighthouse.  Ten in one group were observed at the pool.)
       
      During the two hours at the refuge, we also observed a pair of juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-herons foraging in the marsh grasses east of the lighthouse and an adult Black-crowned at Headquarters Pool.  Other highlights included four Purple Gallinules, one adult and three juveniles at Headquarters Pool. 
       
      A quiet but beautiful and moody evening at the refuge.
       
      Harry Hooper
      Tallahassee, Florida
       
       
       




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    • Jim Stevenson
      That sounds like a great sight! Many years ago, one of the most unbelievable ornithological events took place in August. Down in SW Florida, a flock of these
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 29, 2010
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        That sounds like a great sight!

        Many years ago, one of the most unbelievable ornithological events took place in August. Down in SW Florida, a flock of these same Eastern Kingbirds were seen by many, and estimated to be in excess of a quarter million. (a no "fly" zone?)

        If you miss the good 'ol days of birding, let me tell you it's far, far worse missing all the snakes we used to have.

        Jim


        From: Harry Hooper
        Sent: Friday, August 27, 2010 7:34 PM
        To: nflbirds
        Subject: [nflbirds] kingbird fallout



        Evening nflbirders,

        Lynn and I made a short late afternoon trip to St. Marks NWR today. As we approached East River Pool, several small flocks of Eastern Kingbirds were observed flying south eventually landing in the marsh at the south end of the pool and in the large hardwoods by the road. We enjoyed observing several aerial skirmishes amongst individual birds as these flocks approached and landed. Overall, 27 birds were counted though with all the activity, there were probably additional birds present. Migration of this species appears to be in progress.

        (On August 23, last year, Lynn and her mom recorded 30 Eastern Kingbirds scattered between East River Pool and the lighthouse. Ten in one group were observed at the pool.)

        During the two hours at the refuge, we also observed a pair of juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-herons foraging in the marsh grasses east of the lighthouse and an adult Black-crowned at Headquarters Pool. Other highlights included four Purple Gallinules, one adult and three juveniles at Headquarters Pool.

        A quiet but beautiful and moody evening at the refuge.

        Harry Hooper
        Tallahassee, Florida




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