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St George Is/Sunday

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  • John Murphy
    I ran into Jim Cavanagh at St George Is SP this morning and though we didn t find anything as exciting as the Duncan s G-T towhee, we had some good species
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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      I ran into Jim Cavanagh at St George Is SP this morning and though we didn't find anything as exciting as the Duncan's G-T towhee, we had some good species among the hundreds of Myrtle warblers.

      Scissor-tailed flycatcher - 2
      Golden-crowned kinglet - 6
      Canada warbler (an apparent first-fall female - could not discern any breast streaking; very late date)
      White-throated sparrow - 2
      Baltimore oriole

      John Murphy
      Alligator Pt, FL


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    • John Murphy
      It was a day to remember at the St George Is SP youth camp.  It started out slow, but by mid-morning the birds started coming in waves which continued through
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 25 7:28 PM
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        It was a day to remember at the St George Is SP youth camp.  It started out slow, but by mid-morning the birds started coming in waves which continued through early afternoon.  Rodney Cassidy was keeping better notes than me, so he may want to amend my list (highlights)...



        Peregrine falcon - 1

        Yellow-billed cuckoo - 25

        Black-billed cuckoo - 1

        Ruby-throated hummingbird - 5

        E wood-pewee - 6

        E kingbird - 6

        G kingbird - 1

        Yellow-throated vireo - 3

        Red-eyed vireo - 35

        Veery - 4

        Gray-cheeked thrush - 8

        Swainson's thrush - 2

        Wood thrush - 8

        Gray catbird - 60

        Blue-winged warbler - 3

        Golden-winged w. - 2

        Tennessee w. - 2

        Yellow w. - 15

        Chestnut-sided w. 3

        Magnolia w. - 8

        Cape May w. - 4

        Yellow-rumped w. - 2

        Black-throated green w. - 12

        Prairie w. - 4

        Palm w. - 4

        Blackpoll w. - 1

        Black & white w. - 6

        Am redstart - 6

        Prothonotary w. - 5

        Worm-eating w. - 3

        Ovenbird - 1

        La waterthrush - 1

        Kentucky w. - 1

        C yellowthroat - 12

        Hooded w. - 5

        Summer tanager - 10

        Scarlet tanager - 30

        Rose-breasted grosbeak - 55

        Blue-grosbeak - 25

        Indigo bunting - 60

        Painted bunting - 5

        Dickcissel - 5

        Bobolink - 3

        Orchard oriole - 12



        John Murphy

        Alligator Pt, FL




         

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      • Beth W. Grant
        Please explain the phenomenon of fallout to the group for those of us who are new to birding. I guess it means birds come down from a storm, but please give
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 26 8:19 AM
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          Please explain the phenomenon of fallout to the group for those of us who are new to birding. I guess it means birds come down from a storm, but please give more details.

          Thanks, Beth
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        • Jim Stevenson
          Beth, et al, Fallouts are groundings of Neotropical migrants coming from Central or South America, or the West Indies. They generally occur when weather forces
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 26 5:06 PM
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            Beth, et al,

            Fallouts are groundings of Neotropical migrants coming from Central or South America, or the West Indies. They generally occur when weather forces (mostly) songbirds out of the air, such as head winds (out of the North) or rain (especially).

            The spring trade winds come from the southeast, and are likely responsible for trans-Gulf migration in the first place. The Florida Panhandle gets mostly West Indian species in spring, such as Worm-eating Warblers, Indigo Buntings, Orchard Orioles and many more, while those from Central and South America tend more towards the Western Gulf like Texas, where I live. [In fall, Florida gets more birds in total, as most birds tend to migrate in a loop, moving south much farther east than they move north in spring). [Oh, how I miss October cold fronts on St. George Island - always the best day of the year!]

            This past week, Texas has had strong westerly winds, and my property alone (!) has had many far western birds including Western Tanager, gobs of Western Kingbirds, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Lesser Nighthawk, Lark Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting and the western race of Bell's Vireo. These winds will deliver many such species, and possibly others, to your doorstep this week, as it moves across the South. Western winds, such as what often precede spring cold fronts, are real bird deliverers to Florida, as birds migrating across almost any part of the Gulf might wind up in the Panhandle. [Conversely, in Texas, we want east winds, as they do the same thing for us.]

            One piece of advice from birding Franklin County for decades, and writing a master's thesis on the subject: Don't wait too long to get to the coast at the onset of a front! Birds, driven by raging hormones, will leave the coast for their breeding grounds when they are barely able to get airborne. But in all of nature, there is simply nothing more powerful than witnessing a true fallout. Even after seeing them for over 50 years (God, I'm old!), I am humbled and thankful to be alive when the warblers and their kin start dropping from the sky.

            It even beats road cruising for snakes.

            Jim in Galveston



            From: Beth W. Grant
            Sent: Monday, April 26, 2010 10:19 AM
            To: North Fl Birds
            Subject: [nflbirds] St George Is/Sunday



            Please explain the phenomenon of fallout to the group for those of us who are new to birding. I guess it means birds come down from a storm, but please give more details.

            Thanks, Beth
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          • John Murphy
            Dotty Robbins and I found a nice bit of migrant activity at the youth camp at St George Is State Park this morning, the highlights being both BELL S and
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 5, 2010
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              Dotty Robbins and I found a nice bit of migrant activity at the youth camp at St George Is State Park this morning, the highlights being both BELL'S and PHILADELPHIA vireos.  My earliest date ever for Philadelphia.  Also saw Veery (4), Blackburnian warbler (5) and Baltimore oriole (5). 


              John Murphy

              Alligator Pt, FL



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