Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

St. Marks Saturday

Expand Messages
  • michael hartley
    My dad and I also missed some of the birds listed for today; we birded the refuge between 1130 and 430. We did see a Prothontary Warbler and a Blue-headed
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 7, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      My dad and I also missed some of the birds listed for today; we birded the
      refuge between 1130 and 430. We did see a Prothontary Warbler and a
      Blue-headed Vireo at the double bridges, but not much else. Nothing of note
      at the restrooms, but Headquarters Pond had 5 Black-necked Stilts and 3
      Green Heron. The Lighthouse Pond was hopping though. Blue-winged Teal,
      Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Ducks (2 females), Shovelers, Western and
      Least Sandpipers, SB Dowitchers, the Reddish Egrets, 2 Horned Grebes and 1
      Common Loon in the bay with 1 Bonaparte's Gull perched on a buoy (net
      marker?) in the bay, Yellowlegs, 2 Whimbrel, and three Marbled Godwits. We
      struggled with the Godwits for a while as they kept their heads tucked.
      Their bills also appeared to be more straight than upturned, but were
      clearly pink at the base with black tips, and their plumage was brown with
      bars forming across the belly and mottled on the back. Total species for
      today was 70. We didn't have time to thoroughly investigate the high
      numbers of shorebirds near the Lighthouse, but they were an impressive
      display.

      Also this morning in the yard White-throated Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow and
      Ruby-crowned Kinglet are still present, meanwhile a Great-crested Flycatcher
      and Ruby-throated Hummingbird have finally arrived.

      Michael Hartley
      Tallahassee, FL


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Edwwjr@aol.com
      I visited St. Marks about midday Saturday. Because of a controlled burn mixed with an overcast day, visibility was greatly reduced throughout the refuge.
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 15, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I visited St. Marks about midday Saturday. Because of a controlled burn
        mixed with an overcast day, visibility was greatly reduced throughout the
        refuge. The avocets were still present in the Lighthouse pool along with quite a
        few shorebird and tern species. In with a large flock of dowitchers and
        turnstones were 2 Wilson's plover. In addition, about 25 oystercatchers were
        present and one greater yellowlegs.

        In the area behind the restrooms, I had one black and white warbler, a white
        eyed vireo, savannah sparrow, and a chipping sparrow.

        Ed Woodruff
        Tallahassee



        **************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms, and advice on AOL Money &
        Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolprf00030000000001)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Edwwjr@aol.com
        I spent most of Saturday afternoon birding at St. Marks NWR. Green-winged teal were the most numerous duck and were in several impoundment areas. At
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 21 8:19 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          I spent most of Saturday afternoon birding at St. Marks NWR. Green-winged
          teal were the most numerous duck and were in several impoundment areas. At
          lighthouse pool, there were redheads, widgeon, green-winged teal, lesser scaup
          and a single male greater scaup.

          Talking with a couple who had ridden their bikes out on the dikes, they
          reported several other species including pintails still in the eastern ponds.

          Shorebirds included greater yellowlegs, least sandpipers, and 42 dowitchers
          visible from the "t" dike.

          Ed Woodruff
          Tallahassee
          **************Need a job? Find an employment agency near you.
          (http://yellowpages.aol.com/search?query=employment_agencies&ncid=emlcntusyelp00000003)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Edwwjr@aol.com
          Michael Evans and I birded at St. Marks NWR Saturday morning until shortly after noon. We had 6 species of ducks at the lighthouse pool: a pair of gadwall,
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 21, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Michael Evans and I birded at St. Marks NWR Saturday morning until shortly
            after noon. We had 6 species of ducks at the lighthouse pool: a pair of
            gadwall, 4 blue-winged teal, widgeon, a nice sized flock of redheads, 2 lesser
            scaup, and numerous bufflehead both in the pool and off-shore. Also off-shore
            we had one red-breasted merganser and a fly-over calling common loon.

            On the way in about 8:00 - 8:45 AM at the double bridges we had a nice mixed
            flock. Northern parula were everywhere. We had one red-eyed vireo and
            several white-eyed vireo both seen and calling. 1 yellow-throated warbler and
            another later across from the restroom parking lot.

            Michael had 3 swallow-tailed kites during the morning.

            Total species for the day was 61.

            Ed Woodruff
            Tallahassee
            **************Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10 or
            less. (http://food.aol.com/frugal-feasts?ncid=emlcntusfood00000001)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Edwwjr@aol.com
            One blue-winged teal and one red-breasted remain near the lighthouse. Least bitterns (6) were seen frequently along the double dikes as were my first of the
            Message 5 of 6 , May 2, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              One blue-winged teal and one red-breasted remain near the lighthouse.

              Least bitterns (6) were seen frequently along the double dikes as were my
              first of the season purple gallinule (8).

              The area around the restrooms and the trail leading to the left from the
              fire tower were steady but not numerous. Blackpoll, yellow-throated, pine,
              palm, and Cape May warblers were seen.

              A northern waterthrush continues along the creek near the closed overlook.

              Tower pond was full of shorebirds.

              Ed Woodruff
              Tallahassee
              **************Check all of your email inboxes from anywhere on the web.
              Try the new Email Toolbar now!
              (http://toolbar.aol.com/mail/download.html?ncid=txtlnkusdown00000027)


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Candy and Michael Hill
              I feel compelled to share with the group that I had the best migrant bird viewing in many years at SMNWR, mostly around the bathroom trails. Eddie White and I
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 20, 2014
              • 0 Attachment

                I feel compelled to share with the group that I had the best migrant bird viewing in many years at SMNWR, mostly around the bathroom trails.  Eddie White and I took off work on Wednesday, the 16th  and scored 18 warbler species.  You’ve seen the list.  Thanks to all who post them!  Then I took my wife and daughter on Saturday, promising them fine viewing.  (21 warbler species) They both got several lifers, but the amazing thing was ELEVEN painted buntings (only three were females)!  We were astonished with nine PABU, but as we drove home by Stoney Bayou, another pair flew up and stood alongside the road.  A walk at Cedar Point trail, displayed two male black throated greens on the ground between the posts of that sign.  Further along, a beautiful black throated blue male.  Also, 4 Northern waterthrush, and of course, many indigo buntings, kept us going.  If I wasn’t so tired, I might go back today!

                 

                Michael Hill, Tallahassee     

                 

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.