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Falconry

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  • kelenskiovich
    I just wanted to post this to clear a few things up. I do appreciate the few who agreed to help me, though I noticed you didnt post in the group, I understand.
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 3, 2003
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      I just wanted to post this to clear a few things up. I do appreciate
      the few who agreed to help me, though I noticed you didnt post in the
      group, I understand. Im just going to post a few facts about falconry
      to hopefully quell a few fears. I am very new at the sport, so I am
      not the most qualified.

      1. It is VERY regulated. Getting a liscense requires a written test,
      thousands of dollars of equipment, constant inspections of the
      housing and the bird itself, as well as being an apprentice for two
      years. Beleive me, no one gets a license without being very concerned
      for the welfare of Birds of Prey.

      2. These birds are kept in better condition than any zoo. They
      require a large indoor area to escape weather and to spend the molt
      as well as a large outdoor area in wich to fly free. They are also
      flown totally free, outside, with no leashes or fences, everyday for
      hours at a time. Thier hunting skills are also well honed. Ask any
      falconer and you will get the same response, "The best sign of a good
      falconer is the health of his bird."

      3. Mortality. There is a reason that only young birds may be taken
      from the wild. nearly 70% of juvenile RT Hawks never make it through
      thier first year. In falconry, that mortality rate is 4.7%.
      Considering the fact that only one bird may be taken per year, only
      one bird may be kept at any one time and that there are only a
      handful of falconers in the US, the sports impact on these birds is
      minimal.

      4. Morality. I totally understand some of your negative views. We all
      have our own opinions. But consider this. Most research done on Birds
      of Prey is done by Falconers or supported by falconers. Thanks to
      this 4000 year old sport, we have greatly increased our knowledge of
      Diurnal Birds of Prey. Most Falconers work with raptor rehab programs
      and are staunch conservationists. Disargeeing with the sport is one
      thing. I disagree with commercial fishing. But calling it immoral is
      a slap in the face to alot of people who have spent years improving
      the life of Birds of Prey and helping protect the habitat of all
      birds.

      I dont want to be considered a flamer, so Im not going to respond
      anymore to the topic. I really like the group and enjoy reading about
      the different birds native to the area. Im not an avid bird watcher,
      but I do spend a great deal of time watching Raptors. If anyone is
      interested in watching Osprey fish here in Pensacola, let me know and
      I would be happy to take you to the Navy base some morning!

      Thanks and forgive the spelling!
    • Jack Dozier
      I join John Hintermister in the utter disgust of falconry. Birds, and all wildlife should be just that--wild, and unrestrained. Probably because they can
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 3, 2003
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        I join John Hintermister in the utter disgust of falconry. Birds, and all
        wildlife should be just that--wild, and unrestrained. Probably because
        they can fly, birds represent the epitome of freedom. Subconsciously, that
        might be what attracted me to birding. I know it is "legal" if you have a
        license, but it isn't right in my book. Those that are prone to this
        non-sport should get a model airplane, or buy a dog to train.

        Jack Dozier
        Alligator Pt., FL
        jdozier@...
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