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Northern Gannet

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  • Houlem@aol.com
    We have observed Northern Gannet from our condo at Seagrove Beach over the years, always at a great distance. They always seemed to be diving from great
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 16, 2003
      We have observed Northern Gannet from our condo at Seagrove Beach over the
      years, always at a great distance. They always seemed to be diving from
      great heights. Always a good bird.

      On Sunday, 16Mar we saw what at first glance appeared to be a Snow Goose
      sitting on the water about 50 yards out into the Gulf. Large black tips were
      obvious on the wings while the birds were sitting on the gulf. A quick look
      with the bins revealed Northern Gannet. They were on the water, juvenile and
      adult alike, right where the dolphin were just breaking the surface. There
      were apparent schools of fish trying to avoid both enemies. The Gannet
      appeared to be feeding at the surface without the spectacular diving
      performance. This was a treat.

      The Gannet were joined by Common Loon and great numbers of Brown Pelican,
      along with the normal Gulls and Tern. A great day.

      On Saturday we saw loads of shorebirds, for someone from Wisconsin, at
      Crooked Island in Bay County. Black-bellied, Semipalmated, Piping, Wilsons
      and Snowy Plover, all in good numbers along with Dunlin, Dowitcher,
      Yellowlegs, Willet, Sanderling and more. What a great study for someone not
      familiar with these birds.

      Life is good in the Panhandle,

      * Mike Houle * houlem@... * La Crosse WI * USA *

      It's great to be alive as the birds of spring filter north with good voice
      and cheer.


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    • Daniel Greene
      I went for a swim last night at Tyndall AFB near Mexico Beach (Bay Co, FL).  I was watching sanderlings on the beach, and when I turned around to look out
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4, 2011
        I went for a swim last night at Tyndall AFB near Mexico Beach (Bay Co, FL).  I was watching sanderlings on the beach, and when I turned around to look out over the Gulf, I had an immature northern gannet 6 feet behind me (it was ~30 ft off of the beach, and I have no idea whether it flew or swam in to me).  When I noticed it, it simulateously noticed me and slowly moved away.
         
        Dan Greene
        Bay Co, FL

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      • Jim Stevenson
        Just a reminder that the best time to find boobies is late summer, and some species/plumages look VERY much like some gannet morphs. Boobies are much smaller,
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4, 2011
          Just a reminder that the best time to find boobies is late summer, and some species/plumages look VERY much like some gannet morphs. Boobies are much smaller, though, but your field guide can aid in separating them.

          Gannets are winter residents, and they are among our latest arrivals in fall, so any gannets you are seeing have oversummered here and may not be healthy.

          Good birding,

          Jim
          Sydney, Aust.

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