Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

5th October, 2001 (# 4) News Clippings Digest.

Expand Messages
  • grahamu_1999@yahoo.com
    5th October, 2001 (# 4) News Clippings Digest. 1. CHARLESTON (SC) POST & COURIER Theater Review: Heart-rending drama views gay prejudice ( The Laramie
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 6, 2001
      5th October, 2001 (# 4) News Clippings Digest.

      1. CHARLESTON (SC) POST & COURIER Theater Review: Heart-rending
      drama views gay prejudice ("The Laramie Project")
      2. ASSOCIATED PRESS Nebraska Supreme Court heard arguments this
      morning in lesbian adoption case
      3. THE MISSOULIAN (Montana) Phelps Family Circus is coming to
      Missoula to hold a "God Hates America" rally
      4. MICHIGAN DAILY Coming Out Week begins tomorrow
      5. MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE University of Minnesota man finds reign
      as homecoming queen exciting, scary
      6. SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Actress Naomi Watts talks about her
      lesbian bed scene in David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive"

      Charleston Post & Courier, October 5, 2001
      134 Columbus St., Charleston, SC, 29402
      (Fax: 803-937-5579 ) (E-Mail: editor@... )
      ( http://www.postandcourier.com )
      http://www.charleston.net/pub/news/local/larevu1005.htm
      REVIEW: Heart-rending drama views gay prejudice
      By Dottie Ashley of The Post and Courier Staff
      Technically innovative, demanding and risk-taking all apply to
      the
      drama "The Laramie Project," which opened Thursday at the Footlight
      Players
      Theatre to an 85 percent filled house.
      But the main message in this tragic story is that, try as we
      might,
      there is no way society can categorize homosexuals.
      As Mark Wallace, who plays a Laramie limo driver, says of the
      tough,
      gay guys he knows, "If you mess with a Wyoming queer, he will kick
      you in
      the (rear)."
      The play about the death of the gay college student Matthew
      Shepard,
      who was beaten in Laramie, Wyo., and left to die tied to a fence post
      in
      1998, probably makes even the most anti-gay zealot cringe. However,
      where
      playwright Moises Kaufman succeeds best is in depicting the gray areas
      showing what the vast majority believe about gays, but don't want to
      admit.
      The script also depicted the horde of invading reporters who
      had
      already made up their minds that: "It's tough being gay in cowboy
      country."
      Steve Lepre did a terrific job directing the 14 diverse actors
      playing 50 citizens of Laramie who vent their feelings. In the
      conversations, the phrase "live and let live," crops up often. But
      there is
      only one mention of "acceptance," in regard to homosexuals.
      Only a few of the citizens were one-dimensional, notably a
      Bible-thumping, anti-gay minister. An absolute standout in the cast
      was
      Jeff Jordan as the bartender who served Shepard before he left with
      his two
      murderers, who had led him to believe they were gay. Gene Glave was
      excellent as the emergency room nurse and Tim Corey superb as the
      overly
      cautious president of the University of Wyoming. Extremely plausible
      as the
      matter-of-fact policewoman was Paulette Todd.
      It's a shame the dozen people who left during the two
      intermissions
      (and the show could be shortened by a few minutes) missed the touching
      soliloquy by Shepard's father, who asked that the life of one of the
      murderers be spared.
      Perhaps those who truly should be taken to see this heart-
      rending
      drama are children who begin torturing their classmates who seem
      "different"
      when they are only in the fifth or sixth grade. Only when the young
      start
      seeing the world in a more accepting way will the torture ever really
      cease.
      . REVIEW: "The Laramie Project" by Moises Kaufman and The
      Techtonic
      Theatre Project of New York; directed by Steve Lepre; sets and
      technical
      direction by Richard Heffner at the Footlight Players, 20 Queen St.,
      at 8
      p.m. today and Saturday, continuing Oct. 12, 13, and Oct. 18-20; at 3
      p.m.
      Oct. 14; Tickets $20 general admission, $17 senior citizens and
      students; to
      purchase, call 722-4487 or at the door.
      . THE CAST Ensemble Cast: Samantha Andrews, Tim Corey,
      Jennifer
      Pool, Gene Galve, Trey Howell, Dennis Jaffee, Jeff Jordan, Joanna
      Katz,
      Bradley Keith, Dick Latham, Penny Polychron, Donna Statler, Paulette
      Todd
      and Mark Wallace.


      Associated Press, October 5, 2001
      http://www.theindependent.com/stories/100501/new_gayadoption05.html
      Court to decide if gay couples can adopt
      By Kevin O'Hanlon, The Associated Press
      LINCOLN - The state Supreme Court heard a politically charged
      case
      Friday that could decide if gay couples have the right to adopt
      children in
      Nebraska. The case involves a Lincoln lesbian who wants her lover to
      be
      able to adopt her 3-year-old son.
      The two women were joined in a commitment ceremony in 1995,
      according
      to court records. Such ceremonies are not recognized as marriages in
      Nebraska. Voters last year approved a measure to keep same-sex
      unions from
      being legally recognized.
      Florida is the only state with a law banning any homosexual
      from
      adopting. Utah and Mississippi do not allow same-sex couples to
      adopt but
      have no prohibition against adoptions by gay individuals.
      The boy, named Luke in court papers, was born in 1997. His
      mother
      became pregnant through artificial insemination. The boy has lived
      with his
      mother and her lover since birth.
      The boy's mother also has custody of another son, a 9-year-
      old, from
      a previous marriage.
      While Nebraska law contains no specific provision prohibiting
      adoptions by gay couples, Deputy Attorney General Steve Grasz said
      that does
      not mean it is legal.
      Grasz said in oral arguments and briefs filed in the case that
      the
      mother's lover has no legal rights to adopt the child, even though
      she has
      helped raise him.
      "Such caregivers, unlike parents, possess no substantive
      liberty
      interest in the child," he said. "No fundamental constitutional
      right has
      been accorded in the law to individuals such as foster parents,
      grandparents, caregivers or 'partners' of parents even though they
      have a
      deep emotional attachment to the child."
      He cites a ruling by a Wisconsin court that said it must first
      be
      decided if someone is eligible to adopt a child before a court can
      consider
      what is in the best interests of a child.
      Amy Miller, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union,
      said
      the state's bias is based on its discomfort with the lesbian
      relationship
      and should be irrelevant when it comes to the child's best interests.
      "The decision as to whether or not to permit adoption is made
      by the
      court on the basis of the best interests of the child," she said.
      She said state law provides that "any minor child may be
      adopted by
      an adult or adult persons."
      The case has generated so-called "friend of the court" briefs
      from
      scores of state and national organizations, including: The National
      Organization for Women; the American Psychological Association; the
      Family
      Research Institute; the Nebraska Catholic Conference; the Alliance for
      Children's Rights; and the National Adoption Center.
      Florida's law is considered the nation's toughest, prohibiting
      adoptions by any gay or lesbian individual or couple. It was passed
      in
      1977, the same year, former beauty queen Anita Bryant led a crusade to
      overturn a Dade County ordinance banning discrimination against gays.
      A federal judge in Florida acknowledged in August that two gay
      men
      have a family-like bond with two boys in their care, but that the
      state has
      the right to stop them from adopting the children.


      The Missoulian, October 5, 2001
      Box 8029, Missoula, MT, 59801
      (Fax: 406-523-5221 ) (E-Mail: newsdesk@... )
      http://www.missoulian.com/display/inn_news/news16.txt
      Church brings anti-gay message to Missoula
      By Betsy Cohen of the Missoulian
      A Kansas-based church is heading to Missoula to preach its
      anti-gay
      sentiment.
      The Westboro Baptist Church will hold a "God Hates America"
      rally
      from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 15, at the corner of Sixth Street
      and
      Arthur Avenue.
      Church members said they will be "celebrating" the third
      anniversary
      of the day in which Matthew Shepard, a University of Wyoming student,
      was
      beaten and killed for being a homosexual.
      Church members decided to picket the University of Montana
      through
      its preaching because the public university supports the Lambda
      Alliance, a
      campus group for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered students.
      In a press release to the university, the church pointed to
      the Sept.
      11 terrorist attacks as proof that God is punishing Americans because
      it is
      a nation of homosexuals and homosexual-enablers.
      "This country has gone so far afield from God's commandments,"
      said
      Shirley Phelps-Roper, attorney for the 10-year-old church, daughter
      of the
      church's founder and a church member. "This country goes after evil
      with
      both hands and winks at God - it's just all mockery."
      Phelps-Roper said she will be among the 10 Westboro church
      members
      who will be in Missoula for the one-hour street-preaching event.
      Their mission, she said, is not to solicit members, but only to
      preach the word of God.
      "Our job is to preach it right," she said. "Our job is not to
      win
      someone over - preaching keeps the righteous righteous, and the wicked
      wicked."
      Members of UM's Lambda Alliance said they support everyone's
      right to
      free speech and view the church's arrival as one of opportunity.
      "It will be a chance to really open up the dialogue on campus
      and the
      Missoula community," said Ty Watkins, UM student and public relations
      officer for the alliance. "We look forward to the opportunity to make
      ourselves known in the community."
      The UM group, along with other groups will likely hold a silent
      counter-protest to the church's small gathering, and a vigil on
      campus to
      honor Matthew Shepard. Lambda will hold a planning meeting at 8 p.m.
      Monday.
      For more information, contact the alliance at 243-5922.
      . Reporter Betsy Cohen can be reached at 523-5253 or at
      bcohen@....


      Michigan Daily, October 5, 2001
      University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
      (E-Mail: daily.letters@... )
      ( http://www.michigandaily.com )
      http://www.michigandaily.com/articles.php?uniqid=20011005n12
      Coming Out Week begins tomorrow
      Margaret Engoren for the Daily
      Expect a rainbow-colored campus this week.
      The Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Affairs
      annually
      sponsors campus events to celebrate National Coming Out Week.
      National
      Coming Out Week originated as National Coming Out Day, an event begun
      during
      a march on Washington, D.C., on Oct. 11, 1987. For the last six
      years, the
      week surrounding Oct. 11 has been one of national recognition for gay
      rights
      and awareness.
      This year, the University's National Coming Out Week is
      scheduled to
      begin tomorrow with the GenderBenderRevue: the FOURth Dimension at the
      Pierpont Commons on North Campus. The show includes a number of new
      artists
      and will take place in a new cabaret-style venue.
      "We hope to introduce people to the Office of LGBTA. We want
      to make
      sure they know we are here," said Kelly Garrett, a coordinator of
      programs
      and student development in the Office of LGBTA. "The events offer an
      opportunity to raise awareness and acceptance."
      This year's NCOW events include an open house at the Office of
      LGBTA
      on Tuesday, a National Coming Out Day Rally Thursday on the Diag, and
      a NCOW
      Social at 3200 Michigan Union next Friday.
      "About 400 people typically participate in NCOW activities and
      we are
      expecting a good turn-out this year," said Garrett.
      The Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Affairs is
      celebrating its 30th birthday this year - making it the oldest
      university
      LGBTA office in the country.
      This year's GenderBenderRevue is dedicated to the University's
      Office
      of LGBTA, to commemorate the office's anniversary. Gender Mosaic, the
      student organization that cosponsors the event, will honor the office
      during
      the show for its advocacy on behalf of lesbian, gay, bisexual and
      transgendered students.
      Other than sponsoring campus-wide National Coming Out Week
      activities, the Office of LGBTA provides support groups, offers
      programs,
      and conducts research to benefit gay, bisexual, and transgendered
      students.
      . Coming Out Week
      Tomorrow: GenderBenderRevue: the FOURth Dimension, 7-9 p.m.,
      Pierpont Commons
      Tuesday: Open House, Office of LGBTA
      Wednesday: Dinner, Sex and a Movie, 3200 Michigan Union
      Thursday: National Coming Out Day Rally, noon, Diag; Color
      Splash,
      8-10 p.m., Trotter House, 1443 Washtenaw Ave.
      Friday: National Coming Out Week Social, 3-5 p.m., 3200
      Michigan
      Union


      Minneapolis Star Tribune, October 5, 2001
      425 Portland Avenue, Minneapolis, MN, 55408
      (Fax: 612-673-4359 ) (E-Mail: opinion@... )
      ( http://www.startribune.com/ )
      http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/736597.html
      Man finds reign as homecoming queen exciting, scary
      Statewire
      MORRIS, Minn. (AP) - A 21-year-old man said his short reign as
      homecoming queen at the University of Minnesota-Morris was both
      exciting and
      scary.
      "I had to have that tiara, " joked Patrick Woods, who reigned
      for two
      days last weekend, adding that it was "the best and worst experience
      of my
      life."
      He said he wasn't trying to make a political statement about
      gender
      roles, although he said he thought homecoming was a somewhat outdated
      event.
      "And since the student body elected me, lots of them must
      agree," he
      said. Morris students choose him to preside over homecoming
      festivities
      with king Ryan Brux.
      Woods received thunderous applause at the three big homecoming
      events - coronation, the parade and the football game - but his
      experience
      also had a darker side.
      The men's wrestling team boycotted some homecoming activities,
      and
      this week Woods has found himself the target of threats that have
      made him
      "feel more afraid than I ever have in my life."
      "I can't believe how seriously people take this," he said. "I
      mean,
      homecoming is just a two-day event. It's not like I'm going to be out
      cutting ribbons at Wal-Marts or something."
      Woods was nominated by E-Quality (Morris' gay, lesbian,
      bisexual and
      transgender student organization), the Women's Resource Center and his
      rock-climbing club.
      "I'm a pretty social guy, but now I don't feel like I can go
      anywhere
      alone and be safe," he said. "I wish life could just go back to
      normal.
      But it's not."


      San Francisco Chronicle, October 5, 2001
      901 Mission St., San Francisco, CA, 94103
      (Fax: 415-896-1107 ) (E-Mail: chronletters@... )
      ( http://www.sfgate.com )
      http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
      bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/10/05
      /DD22083.DTL
      Not all mum on new Lynch film
      Actress Watts divulges details of lesbian bed scene
      Ruthe Stein
      At a sneak preview of "Mulholland Drive" at the Embarcadero
      Cinema,
      star Naomi Watts offered to take questions from the audience, but
      warned,
      "As you know, it is a David Lynch film, so I probably won't be able to
      answer all of them."
      There's one question Lynch has requested the cast to stay mum
      on:
      How much of the movie was lifted from his TV pilot? "Mulholland
      Drive"
      started life as a potential ABC series - until the network got a load
      of it
      and deemed it too weird for the small screen.
      With an impish smile, Watts allowed that her erotic love scene
      with
      Laura Elena Harring "obviously was not part of the pilot." The
      anticipation
      of getting naked in bed with her co-star was "a little bit nerve-
      racking,
      but once we got down to it, it was OK," Watts confided to me.
      "The lighting was very dark, and almost nobody was allowed on
      the
      set, so you didn't feel exploited. We'd be kissing and doing
      whatever we
      were doing, and then David would yell, 'Cut,' and we would fall back
      in bed
      in a state of giggles. When I see the scene now, it seems so
      sensual, as if
      these two women really do love each other. But it didn't feel as
      authentic
      when we shot it. That's just as well. Otherwise, I would have had
      to marry
      Laura!"
      =====================================================
      • Would you like to help promote the Newsclippings service?
      HTML Code for Newsclippings - Just copy and paste this link into your
      web page.
      HTML code:
      <center>
      <a href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/newsclippings/join">
      <img src="http://groups.yahoo.com/img/ui/join.gif" border=0><br>
      Click to subscribe to newsclippings</a>
      </center>
      ====================================================
      • TO SUBSCRIBE NEWS CLIPPINGS LIST, E-mail to:
      newsclippings-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      __________________________________________________________
      * Questions / Feedback / Archive / Links
      • Message Archive
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/newsclippings
      • Links
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/newsclippings/links
      List owner: newsclippings-owner@yahoogroups.com
      Unsubscribe: newsclippings-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      __________________________________________________________
      Australian Business Number (ABN): 51 226 695 391
      • Any donations to help cover the costs involved in providing you with
      this service would be appreciated. Either a bank draft in Australian
      dollars, or an Australian bank cheque. Please mail to:
      Graham Underhill
      P O Box 2214
      GPO Melbourne
      Victoria, 3001
      Australia.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.