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Re: power source

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  • rakolam
    ... and it ... it apart ... experience in ... immersed ... difficulties in ... integral part of ... wrong ... without a good ... never ... apart to see ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 3, 2003
      > Such friers can be used as boilers Dave (I use one as a water bath,
      and it
      > serves very well in that role), but I would caution about pulling
      it apart
      > to use components in a keg unless you have a good deal of
      experience in
      > matters electrical and mechanical. I see that it utilises an oil
      immersed
      > heater element, and this is likely to present considerable
      difficulties in
      > removing the 'working parts' as the oil bath is probably an
      integral part of
      > the structure of the beast. So while there is nothing 'glaringly
      wrong'
      > with your idea, it is not something that should be undertaken
      without a good
      > deal of knowledge about the construction of the beast .. a lesson I
      never
      > seemed to learn when when I was a kid intent on pulling clocks
      apart to see
      > how they work. They come apart fine ... the trick is getting them
      back
      > together again! :-)
      > All the best,
      > Mike N

      Mike,
      I completely agree. I too did the clock thing when I was a kid..
      one of the all mechanical ones with the two bells on top with a
      striker in the middle. I got the backing off, and *SPROING*... the
      parts suddenly lept out of the casing. Oops. From then on it was
      electronic clocks only, and then only until I found out what a 555
      timer IC was.

      I'm not too worried about putting humpty dumpty back together
      again, as I've had a great deal of tinkering experience since my
      clock killing days. Though there are certainly dangers in making
      modifications to existing appliances, I am much more concerned about
      about building something that plugs into the wall from scratch.
      Since the controller and element is all one unit that conveniently
      comes out for cleaning, I figured all I had to do was seperate the
      plastic controller from the element. and extend the two power and
      temperature leads. These I can check with a multimeter before and
      after to make sure that there properties are still the same (I am
      betting on the fact that any very slight increase in resistance won't
      be a problem) I had thought about the difference of viscosity between
      oil and the contents of my boiler.... and to be quite frank, I am
      pretty much going on a hunch that it won't be a big deal. Either
      way, precautions are always in order during the testing phase, and
      the worst that could happen is that I lose a fryer that I don't use.

      Thanks for the response!

      Dave
    • Mike Nixon
      rakolam wrote: Subject: [new_distillers] Re: power source Mike, I completely agree. I too did the clock thing when I was a kid.. one of the all mechanical
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 3, 2003
        rakolam wrote:
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: power source

        Mike,
        I completely agree. I too did the clock thing when I was a kid..
        one of the all mechanical ones with the two bells on top with a
        striker in the middle. I got the backing off, and *SPROING*... the
        parts suddenly lept out of the casing. Oops. From then on it was
        electronic clocks only, and then only until I found out what a 555
        timer IC was. (snip)
        ===========================
        Those were the days! :-) We were allowed to climb trees then too without
        some PC idiot telling us it was 'too dangerous'.

        Good luck with your project. Just think, if it works then you can have a
        side order of fries with your booze! :-)

        Mike N
      • Alexander-James Corbin Rauwsen III
        ... The secret to getting clocks and watches apart with out the parts flying all over the place is to let the mainspring down before you take any screws out of
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 4, 2003
          > I completely agree. I too did the clock thing when I was a kid..
          > one of the all mechanical ones with the two bells on top with a
          > striker in the middle. I got the backing off, and *SPROING*... the
          > parts suddenly lept out of the casing. Oops.
          The secret to getting clocks and watches apart with out the parts
          flying all over the place is to let the mainspring down before you
          take any screws out of the bridges. The second largest problem is
          cheap clocks and watches use a single plate to hold all the wheels and
          escapment together more expensive ones use seperate plates (bridges)
          for the train, balance, escapement, mainspring. If you dont know what
          any of this means is best to leave your broken clock broken but complete.
          Im working on still #2 the small carbonator tank (4 USG) worked great
          but Im looking to bigger and more high tech. A friend left me 2 old
          stainless firestone 15.5 USG kegs over the weekend the kind with a
          hole in the side and top. the thing that really caught me was the
          keyhole shaped bulge in the bottom perfect for fitting a heating
          element into fron the side. I threaded a piece of stainless pipe to
          take a water heater element planning to weld it in the side tomorrow.
          For control I picked up a really cool foxboro temp controller takes
          RTD in, on off control out, multiple set points ect...
          Ive been lurking for awhile but the weather is getting cold and that
          means time to work on things around the house where its warm.
          Laterz
          AJ
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