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Re: ANYLASE ENZIME: CONVERT STARCHES INTO SUGARS

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  • flaming_pinto
    Wal, you are probably correct, all I know is that for our purposes, good old malted barley is all the bourbon brewers or Kentucky and Tennessee have needed to
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 2, 2003
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      Wal,
      you are probably correct, all I know is that for our purposes, good
      old malted barley is all the bourbon brewers or Kentucky and
      Tennessee have needed to convert their cracked corn. Most of them
      don't malt their corn because the malted barley does a good enough
      job without going to the trouble of malting all that corn.

      Flaming_pinto


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      > For full conversion you need alpha-amylase, beta-amylase and gluco-
      > amylase. Malted barley might not have the gluco-amylase which is
      > added to get a dry beer and remove unconverted starches. Correct me
      > if I am wrong.
      > Wal
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "flaming_pinto"
      > <flaming_pinto@y...> wrote:
      > > FYI, the amylase you buy in the brew supply shops as a powder is
      > made
      > > to clear the starch-haze out of a beer wash during fermentation.
      > By
      > > itself it does a very poor job of converting starches during a
      > > mashing phase because it only attacks the short-chain sections of
      > the
      > > starch and can't break the bonds to get at the rest of the
      > molecule.
      > > Your best bet is to use some 6-row barley, as it contains plenty
      of
      > > the right kind of amylase to fully convert the corn sugars. You
      > > could add some of the powdered enzyme as extra insurance if you
      > like.
      > >
      > > A few pounds of 6-row barley at the brew-supply shop will only
      cost
      > > you a dollar or two more than buying the powdered enzyme but will
      > > make a world of difference in the finished product. Make sure
      you
      > > have the barley cracked before bring it home.
      > >
      > > Flaming_pinto
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "corn_wash"
      <corn_wash@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > PLACE CRACKED GRAIN INTO A COOKING POT, add 1/2 tsp. for each 3-
      5
      > > > gal,cook at 150F (no hotter) for 45min. to 1 hr. stir a few
      times
      > > > while cooking, the amylase will convert the starches to sugar
      for
      > > the
      > > > mash (wort) amylase can be purchased at most brew stores.
    • waljaco
      I am probably wrong. Malted barley contains alpha-amylase, beta- amylase and beta-glucanase. It appears beta-glucanase (optimum temp. 45-50C) removes gum-like
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 2, 2003
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        I am probably wrong. Malted barley contains alpha-amylase, beta-
        amylase and beta-glucanase. It appears beta-glucanase (optimum temp.
        45-50C) removes gum-like beta-glucans. It appears you can get
        complete conversion with malted barley which can be tested -
        http://www.realbeer.com/jjpalmer/ch14.html

        Glucoamylase enzyme is made by the Aspergillus mould.

        Wal
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "flaming_pinto"
        <flaming_pinto@y...> wrote:
        > Wal,
        > you are probably correct, all I know is that for our purposes, good
        > old malted barley is all the bourbon brewers or Kentucky and
        > Tennessee have needed to convert their cracked corn. Most of them
        > don't malt their corn because the malted barley does a good enough
        > job without going to the trouble of malting all that corn.
        >
        > Flaming_pinto
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...>
        wrote:
        > > For full conversion you need alpha-amylase, beta-amylase and
        gluco-
        > > amylase. Malted barley might not have the gluco-amylase which is
        > > added to get a dry beer and remove unconverted starches. Correct
        me
        > > if I am wrong.
        > > Wal
        > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "flaming_pinto"
        > > <flaming_pinto@y...> wrote:
        > > > FYI, the amylase you buy in the brew supply shops as a powder
        is
        > > made
        > > > to clear the starch-haze out of a beer wash during
        fermentation.
        > > By
        > > > itself it does a very poor job of converting starches during a
        > > > mashing phase because it only attacks the short-chain sections
        of
        > > the
        > > > starch and can't break the bonds to get at the rest of the
        > > molecule.
        > > > Your best bet is to use some 6-row barley, as it contains
        plenty
        > of
        > > > the right kind of amylase to fully convert the corn sugars.
        You
        > > > could add some of the powdered enzyme as extra insurance if you
        > > like.
        > > >
        > > > A few pounds of 6-row barley at the brew-supply shop will only
        > cost
        > > > you a dollar or two more than buying the powdered enzyme but
        will
        > > > make a world of difference in the finished product. Make sure
        > you
        > > > have the barley cracked before bring it home.
        > > >
        > > > Flaming_pinto
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "corn_wash"
        > <corn_wash@y...>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > > PLACE CRACKED GRAIN INTO A COOKING POT, add 1/2 tsp. for each
        3-
        > 5
        > > > > gal,cook at 150F (no hotter) for 45min. to 1 hr. stir a few
        > times
        > > > > while cooking, the amylase will convert the starches to sugar
        > for
        > > > the
        > > > > mash (wort) amylase can be purchased at most brew stores.
      • Robert N
        Came across this web site that may be able to source botanicals for those that are interested. http://www.screamingseeds.com.au/welcome.html Yours in Spirit
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 4, 2003
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          Came across this web site that may be able to source botanicals for
          those that are interested.
          http://www.screamingseeds.com.au/welcome.html


          Yours in Spirit


          Robert






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