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Aluminum Cooker

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  • Wil
    I have been under the impression that Aluminum was a Verboten in distilling because of some adverse reaction with alcohol and THAT was why everyone was using
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 19 7:46 PM
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      I have been under the impression that Aluminum was a Verboten in
      distilling because of some adverse reaction with alcohol and THAT
      was why everyone was using stainless or copper, however after
      reading back a few months in the posts, the only bad publicity seems
      to be that it pitts easier and requires a little more upkeep. Can
      someone clarify this for me please?? If alumimum DOES work, How
      come I am busting my ass looking around for a stainless pot that
      that i'm going to have to plumb up to make it do what I want and
      costs 3X more!!
    • Shane Kirkman
      Good question Will. Eat-Drink-Smoke and be Happy. Shane. ... From: Wil To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:46 PM Subject:
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 20 5:16 AM
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        Good question Will.
         
         
         
         
         

        Eat-Drink-Smoke and be Happy.
        Shane.
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Wil
        Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:46 PM
        Subject: [new_distillers] Aluminum Cooker

        I have been under the impression that Aluminum was a Verboten in
        distilling because of some adverse reaction with alcohol and THAT
        was why everyone was using stainless or copper,  however after
        reading back a few months in the posts, the only bad publicity seems
        to be that it pitts easier and requires a little more upkeep.  Can
        someone clarify this for me please??  If alumimum DOES work, How
        come I am busting my ass looking around for a stainless pot that
        that i'm going to have to plumb up to make it do what I want and
        costs 3X more!!



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      • peter_vcb
        there is more stainless stuff usually available. aluminum is difficult to weld. most kegs are stainless. copper has good heat transfer properties and is easy
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 22 1:24 AM
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          there is more stainless stuff usually available. aluminum is
          difficult to weld. most kegs are stainless. copper has good heat
          transfer properties and is easy to machine and also strips the
          sulphides from vapours.



          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Wil" <wbg_us@y...> wrote:
          > I have been under the impression that Aluminum was a Verboten in
          > distilling because of some adverse reaction with alcohol and THAT
          > was why everyone was using stainless or copper, however after
          > reading back a few months in the posts, the only bad publicity
          seems
          > to be that it pitts easier and requires a little more upkeep. Can
          > someone clarify this for me please?? If alumimum DOES work, How
          > come I am busting my ass looking around for a stainless pot that
          > that i'm going to have to plumb up to make it do what I want and
          > costs 3X more!!
        • cletemeaders
          I use an aluminum boiler. Am very pleased with it. Found it easy to work-with. It is made from two aluminum pressure-cookers. A 10 gal. (All American) & a 5
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 27 6:55 AM
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            I use an aluminum boiler. Am very pleased with it. Found it easy to
            work-with. It is made from two aluminum pressure-cookers. A 10 gal.
            (All American) & a 5 gal.(National). the lid of the 5 gal. is
            discarded. The pot of the 5 gal. was turned upside-down & centered
            on lid of the 10 gal. I scribed along the outer-edge, then cut
            opening 1/4" smaller (in diameter). Welded the two together and
            smoothed-off the interior edge. It does take alittle more time to
            clean, but with the exisiting-handles on the 10 gal. pot .. its
            makes it very easy to handle which is important to me. I could cook
            10 gal. at a time. clete



            > I have been under the impression that Aluminum was a Verboten in
            > distilling because of some adverse reaction with alcohol and THAT
            > was why everyone was using stainless or copper, however after
            > reading back a few months in the posts, the only bad publicity
            seems
            > to be that it pitts easier and requires a little more upkeep. Can
            > someone clarify this for me please?? If alumimum DOES work, How
            > come I am busting my ass looking around for a stainless pot that
            > that i'm going to have to plumb up to make it do what I want and
            > costs 3X more!!
          • Wil
            Thanks Clete, After NOT getting any major GOD NO YOU CANT DO THATs I decided to go for an Aluminum cooker, found a nice MIRRO 22Q Pressure canner, very
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 27 2:54 PM
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              Thanks Clete,

              After NOT getting any major "GOD NO YOU CANT DO THATs" I decided to
              go for an Aluminum cooker, found a nice MIRRO 22Q Pressure canner,
              very cheap. Should be a snap to plumb up and drill for the heating
              elements.. Am gonna put a 3/4" adapter on it for a thumper to make
              Brandy as well.
            • cletemeaders
              wouldn t it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4 adaptor for brandy? If 22 quart is total volume ..
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 28 4:54 AM
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                wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy? If
                22 quart is total volume .. wouldn't this be small since you'll need
                25-30% air-space? This "new distillers" group can get awful
                technical & indept by those with more experience & knowledge. Half
                the time I do not even know what they're talking about .. however I
                make a clean 92% as a beginner. Quality clean spirit. Its hard to
                get basic info sometimes, even here. although, a handful are very
                understanding and can still talk on a beginner level without trying
                to be impressive. the main thing in my opinion, is to go slow. Read
                info published by tony & "the complete distiller", then educate
                yourself from there. good luck, clete

                > After NOT getting any major "GOD NO YOU CANT DO THATs" I decided
                to
                > go for an Aluminum cooker, found a nice MIRRO 22Q Pressure
                canner,
                > very cheap. Should be a snap to plumb up and drill for the
                heating
                > elements.. Am gonna put a 3/4" adapter on it for a thumper to make
                > Brandy as well.
              • mwmccaw
                Aluminum pots will work well, but can suffer from corrosion with an acidic wash. All turbo washes are quite acidic. (Note - nickel- clad copper heating
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 29 6:20 AM
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                  Aluminum pots will work well, but can suffer from corrosion with an
                  acidic wash. All turbo washes are quite acidic. (Note - nickel-
                  clad copper heating elements will also corrode rapidly in an acidic
                  wash). If an aluminum pot is quickly drained and rinsed thoroughly
                  after each run, it should last a good long time.

                  Both hotplates and mounted elements have their strong points and
                  weak points. If I had to chose, I'd go with a hotplate because the
                  good ones have good heat control, and when not distilling, they are
                  useful for many other things, and it is easy to set up a system for
                  thick or delicate mashes to avoid scorching.
                  If you aren't doing thick mashes, though, an internal element has
                  the advantage of smaller size and a well-defined heat input without
                  your having to set anything.

                  In the end, both questions come down to a matter of personal
                  preference - both choices can and do work very well for a lot of
                  people.

                  Cheers,
                  Mike McCaw


                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cletemeaders"
                  <spacejug@a...> wrote:
                  > wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                  > heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy?
                  If
                  > 22 quart is total volume .. wouldn't this be small since you'll
                  need
                  > 25-30% air-space? This "new distillers" group can get awful
                  > technical & indept by those with more experience & knowledge. Half
                  > the time I do not even know what they're talking about .. however
                  I
                  > make a clean 92% as a beginner. Quality clean spirit. Its hard to
                  > get basic info sometimes, even here. although, a handful are very
                  > understanding and can still talk on a beginner level without
                  trying
                  > to be impressive. the main thing in my opinion, is to go slow.
                  Read
                  > info published by tony & "the complete distiller", then educate
                  > yourself from there. good luck, clete
                  >
                  > > After NOT getting any major "GOD NO YOU CANT DO THATs" I
                  decided
                  > to
                  > > go for an Aluminum cooker, found a nice MIRRO 22Q Pressure
                  > canner,
                  > > very cheap. Should be a snap to plumb up and drill for the
                  > heating
                  > > elements.. Am gonna put a 3/4" adapter on it for a thumper to
                  make
                  > > Brandy as well.
                • Wil
                  Might be easier, bur I have 2 1500 Watt elements here any way, and NO hot plate so it s the munted elements. as for the 3/4 adapter, i will just use a 2 to
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 29 3:26 PM
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                    Might be easier, bur I have 2 1500 Watt elements here any way, and
                    NO hot plate so it's the munted elements. as for the 3/4 adapter,
                    i will just use a 2" to 3/4" reducer to plumb everything to the
                    thumper and coil. Not very high tech, more like the pot still
                    grandpa used, help me get back to my roots :o)


                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cletemeaders"
                    <spacejug@a...> wrote:
                    > wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                    > heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy?>
                  • Raymond Massey
                    hi, having used an aluminium boiler; i would just like to tell you of my experience. after a few go s the aluminium developed tiny holes. this makes it clear
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 30 12:29 AM
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                      hi, having used an aluminium boiler; i would just like to tell you of my experience.
                      after a few 'go's' the aluminium developed tiny holes. this makes it clear that i
                      would recomend that no one use aluminum containers for such a process.
                      remember alziners? dont give it a chance you could regret it in a big way, ray

                      Wil <wbg_us@...> wrote:
                      Might be easier,  bur I have 2 1500 Watt elements here any way,  and
                      NO hot plate so it's the munted elements.  as for the 3/4 adapter, 
                      i will just use a 2" to 3/4" reducer to plumb everything to the
                      thumper and coil.  Not very high tech,  more like the pot still
                      grandpa used,  help me get back to my roots :o)


                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cletemeaders"
                      <spacejug@a...> wrote:
                      >  wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                      > heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy?>



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                    • mwmccaw
                      Pinholes are precisely the result of that pitting corrosion I was referring to. Did you let the spent wash sit in the boiler for any long periods of time?
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 30 6:36 AM
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                        Pinholes are precisely the result of that pitting corrosion I was
                        referring to.
                        Did you let the spent wash sit in the boiler for any long periods of
                        time?
                        Alzheimer's is not a thing to worry about - the aluminum that is
                        dissolved remains in the boiler, it does NOT vaporize and end up in
                        the product.

                        There are a lot of folks on the list happily using aluminum pots. I
                        think that there could be a very fruitful discussion of the
                        pitfalls, and the best maintenance methods for them.
                        Cheers,
                        Mike McCaw




                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Massey
                        <protium2@y...> wrote:
                        > hi, having used an aluminium boiler; i would just like to tell you
                        of my experience.
                        > after a few 'go's' the aluminium developed tiny holes. this makes
                        it clear that i
                        > would recomend that no one use aluminum containers for such a
                        process.
                        > remember alziners? dont give it a chance you could regret it in a
                        big way, ray
                        >
                        > Wil <wbg_us@y...> wrote:
                        > Might be easier, bur I have 2 1500 Watt elements here any way,
                        and
                        > NO hot plate so it's the munted elements. as for the 3/4
                        adapter,
                        > i will just use a 2" to 3/4" reducer to plumb everything to the
                        > thumper and coil. Not very high tech, more like the pot still
                        > grandpa used, help me get back to my roots :o)
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cletemeaders"
                        > <spacejug@a...> wrote:
                        > > wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                        > > heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy?>
                        >
                        >
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                      • Raymond Massey
                        hi, no i did not let the wash sit for long; it was washed and dried as soon as the prosses was over. i m pleased that my boiler had thin walls and that i am
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 30 11:03 AM
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                          hi, no i did not let the wash sit for long; it was washed and dried as soon as the prosses was over. i'm pleased that my boiler had thin walls and that i am happy to leave others to experiment; i learnt my lesson. i hope others do. ray

                          mwmccaw <mwmccaw@...> wrote:
                          Pinholes are precisely the result of that pitting corrosion I was
                          referring to.
                          Did you let the spent wash sit in the boiler for any long periods of
                          time?
                          Alzheimer's is not a thing to worry about - the aluminum that is
                          dissolved remains in the boiler, it does NOT vaporize and end up in
                          the product.

                          There are a lot of folks on the list happily using aluminum pots.  I
                          think that there could be a very fruitful discussion of the
                          pitfalls, and the best maintenance methods for them.
                          Cheers,
                          Mike McCaw




                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Massey
                          <protium2@y...> wrote:
                          > hi, having used an aluminium boiler; i would just like to tell you
                          of my experience.
                          > after a few 'go's' the aluminium developed tiny holes. this makes
                          it clear that i
                          > would recomend that no one use aluminum containers for such a
                          process.
                          > remember alziners? dont give it a chance you could regret it in a
                          big way, ray
                          >
                          > Wil <wbg_us@y...> wrote:
                          > Might be easier,  bur I have 2 1500 Watt elements here any way, 
                          and
                          > NO hot plate so it's the munted elements.  as for the 3/4
                          adapter, 
                          > i will just use a 2" to 3/4" reducer to plumb everything to the
                          > thumper and coil.  Not very high tech,  more like the pot still
                          > grandpa used,  help me get back to my roots :o)
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cletemeaders"
                          > <spacejug@a...> wrote:
                          > >  wouldn't it be easier to use a hot plate than using a mounted
                          > > heating-element. What do you mean by .. 3/4" adaptor for brandy?>
                          >
                          >
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                        • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
                          ... Dont soak it in acidic solutions for longer than necessary, and if so, rinse well afterwards. Make sure that you always clean them well to remove any gunge
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 30 12:50 PM
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                            > There are a lot of folks on the list happily using aluminum pots. I
                            > think that there could be a very fruitful discussion of the
                            > pitfalls, and the best maintenance methods for them.

                            Dont soak it in acidic solutions for longer than necessary, and if so, rinse well afterwards.
                            Make sure that you always clean them well to remove any gunge adhering to them - the pitting will start forming around/under them.
                            ALWAYS dry the aluminium very well - it will only reform its protective surface if clean and dry
                            Dont scrub them too hard when cleaning - you'll be removing the protective oxide coating
                            Avoid contact with dissimilar metals

                            Tony
                          • cletemeaders
                            I think this is the most valid point of all - cleaning. Building my first still. Since it is a hobby,I (like most) use materials most accessible. Am very
                            Message 13 of 13 , Aug 2, 2003
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                              I think this is the most valid point of all - cleaning. Building my
                              first still. Since it is a hobby,I (like most) use materials most
                              accessible. Am very pleased w/my aluminum boiler but make no
                              doubt ... it does require more maintenence (cleaning). Especially if
                              whatever you use (pressure-cookers, etc) are not new or pitted. My
                              most recent was 94%, very clean & sweet-tasting. So it would be hard
                              to say I do not have a proficient still regardless of added time
                              required in maintenence. However, my next project will start from
                              Stainless Steel. since aluminum is softer, common-sense would
                              dictate it to be more absorbent. Making a cleaner-run now & then
                              with water & alittle vinegar seems to be the ticket for me. I think
                              it would be very possible to line the inside of a boiler with copper
                              and have it seal-proof (maybe with the help of a coppersmith).Will
                              attempt this in coming year. clete


                              > > There are a lot of folks on the list happily using aluminum
                              pots. I
                              > > think that there could be a very fruitful discussion of the
                              > > pitfalls, and the best maintenance methods for them.
                              >
                              > Dont soak it in acidic solutions for longer than necessary, and if
                              so, rinse well afterwards.
                              > Make sure that you always clean them well to remove any gunge
                              adhering to them - the pitting will start forming around/under them.
                              > ALWAYS dry the aluminium very well - it will only reform its
                              protective surface if clean and dry
                              > Dont scrub them too hard when cleaning - you'll be removing the
                              protective oxide coating
                              > Avoid contact with dissimilar metals
                              >
                              > Tony
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