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Re: Greetings from a Newbie

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  • CornFed (Randy)
    http://www.distill.com/specs.html this webpage lists specific requirements of ethanol producers in various countries. ... wannabe moonshiner who is currently
    Message 1 of 16 , May 4, 2003
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      http://www.distill.com/specs.html this webpage lists specific
      requirements of ethanol producers in various countries.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, William Coyne
      <coynefamilia@y...> wrote:
      > Hello, I am new to the group. My name is William Coyne. I am a
      wannabe moonshiner who is currently masquerade as a computer
      technician. :) I don't know much about the alcohol manufacturing
      process. I just started educated myself on the subject, via the
      internet, this week. My goal in joining your discussion boards is
      to learn how to manufacture a reflux still and the feasibility of a
      business idea I have been entertaining. I want to distill alcohol for
      profit, outside the US, legally. The still plans I have seen on the
      internet tend to be half-keg size or smaller. Small professionally
      made reflux stills of 100-600 gallons are available on some internet
      sites but appear to cost 10s of thousands of dollars. To this
      prospective moonshiner these stills look like a piece of fine dining
      room furniture or silverware. I am not furniture shopping, I need a
      working tool. The true beauty of any tool is measured in its value
      on the job. That said, does anyone have any suggestions where I could
      buy stainless steel, or copper, equipment that could be used in the
      creation of a 300+ gallon reflux still? or know of an economic
      alternative for sale? (I would prefer the boiler be made of stainless
      steel for safety and cleanliness.) Does anyone have plans for a still
      heads that size? Could you take smaller still plans and just scale
      them up? Also, I have read a little at the different sites about
      output and such. One still company wrote me that I could
      expect, "Our 100 gallon still will produce about 25 to 30 gallons of
      140 proof alcohol a run, at an estimated run time of 3 to 4 hours,
      counting heat up time." I asked for output figures with either
      potatoes or corn as the mash ingredient. Do these numbers sound
      realistic? Since that email I learned you can use table sugar to
      make your liquor. (assuming tasteless ethenol is your goal) If the
      company based their output on potatoes or corn and I switched to
      table sugar does that mean I could double those output figures? Do
      you think gas is a safe and economical way to heat the boiler?
      Besides labor is there any other significant costs involved in the
      production of liquor? IE. Any costly equipment I am overlooking?
      Thanks,Bill coynefamilia@y...
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
    • Brandon Lee
      William-- i recently ran across a man who had constructe a s.s. still operation for fuel purposes-- he has a license to produce 10,000 gals. per year-- he is
      Message 2 of 16 , May 4, 2003
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        William-- i recently ran across a man who had constructe a s.s. still operation for fuel purposes-- he has a license to produce 10,000 gals. per year-- he is selling out his sheet metal business and this is part of it-- the unit  if i am not mistaken is about 300 gal. capacity-- it is professionally built and it fired with propane fuel--i am of no need of such but would be happy to inquire as to the asking price of this setup-- he has a large farm and used it to produce fuel for his tractors-among other things--
        your brother in the spirits
        Blueflame456

        "CornFed (Randy)" <cornfed15@...> wrote:
        http://www.distill.com/specs.html  this webpage lists specific
        requirements of ethanol producers in various countries. 


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, William Coyne
        <coynefamilia@y...> wrote:
        > Hello,  I am new to the group.  My name is William Coyne.  I am a
        wannabe moonshiner who is currently masquerade as a computer
        technician.  :) I don't know much about the alcohol manufacturing
        process.  I just started educated myself on the subject, via the
        internet, this week.   My goal in joining your discussion boards is
        to learn how to manufacture a reflux still and the feasibility of a
        business idea I have been entertaining. I want to distill alcohol for
        profit, outside the US, legally.  The still plans I have seen on the
        internet tend to be half-keg size or smaller.  Small professionally
        made reflux stills of 100-600 gallons are available on some internet
        sites but appear to cost 10s of thousands of dollars.  To this
        prospective moonshiner these stills look like a piece of fine dining
        room furniture or silverware.  I am not furniture shopping, I need a
        working tool.  The true beauty of any tool is measured in its value
        on the job. That said, does anyone have any suggestions where I could
        buy stainless steel, or copper, equipment that could be used in the
        creation of a 300+ gallon reflux still? or know of an economic
        alternative for sale? (I would prefer the boiler be made of stainless
        steel for safety and cleanliness.) Does anyone have plans for a still
        heads that size?  Could you take smaller still plans and just scale
        them up? Also, I have read a little at the different sites about
        output and such.  One still company wrote me that I could
        expect, "Our 100 gallon still will produce about 25 to 30 gallons of
        140 proof alcohol a run, at an estimated run time of 3 to 4 hours,
        counting heat up time." I asked for output figures with either
        potatoes or corn as the mash ingredient.  Do these numbers sound
        realistic?   Since that email I learned you can use table sugar to
        make your liquor.  (assuming tasteless ethenol is your goal)  If the
        company based their output on potatoes or corn and I switched to
        table sugar does that mean I could double those output figures? Do
        you think gas is a safe and economical way to heat the boiler?   
        Besides labor is there any other significant costs involved in the
        production of liquor?  IE.  Any costly equipment I am overlooking? 
        Thanks,Bill coynefamilia@y...     
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.



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      • William Coyne
        Thanks Randy CornFed (Randy) wrote:http://www.distill.com/specs.html this webpage lists specific requirements of ethanol producers
        Message 3 of 16 , May 4, 2003
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          Thanks Randy

          "CornFed (Randy)" <cornfed15@...> wrote:
          http://www.distill.com/specs.html  this webpage lists specific
          requirements of ethanol producers in various countries. 


          Do you Yahoo!?
          The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
        • William Coyne
          Thanks, I would be curious how much it costs. I am probably not in a position to buy it right now though. I am currently trying to get re-settled in the US.
          Message 4 of 16 , May 4, 2003
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            Thanks, I would be curious how much it costs.  I am probably not in a position to buy it right now though.  I am currently trying to get re-settled in the US.  If he still has it in the future though, who knows.
             
            Bill

            Brandon Lee <blueflame456@...> wrote:
            William-- i recently ran across a man who had constructe a s.s. still operation for fuel purposes-- he has a license to produce 10,000 gals. per year-- he is selling out his sheet metal business and this is part of it-- the unit  if i am not mistaken is about 300 gal. capacity-- it is professionally built and it fired with propane fuel--i am of no need of such but would be happy to inquire as to the asking price of this setup-- he has a large farm and used it to produce fuel for his tractors-among other things--
            your brother in the spirits
            Blueflame456


            Do you Yahoo!?
            The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
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