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Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)

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  • Zeke Jones
    You need two separate 110V circuits to get one 220V output....two outlets on the same 110V circuit will not equal 220V......its like running two wires from
    Message 1 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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      You need two separate 110V circuits to get one 220V output....two outlets on the same 110V circuit will not equal 220V......its 'like' running two wires from one- 1.5V battery...you still get only 1.5V....also,I wouldnt recommend using outlets,its better to 'hardwire' your 220V circuit to a breaker box with (at least)two 110V breakers...run one to each element...when you want to shut-off one element,simply 'throw' one of the breakers....better yet...pay an electrician to do the job for you...good luck:>)

      >From: "orgulasmaggot"
      >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
      >Date: Thu, 07 Nov 2002 19:14:22 -0000
      >
      >So I can't just plug in two plugs to each jack in one outlet and get

      >this to work?

      NO!!!

      >

      >Or would I need to use one plug in each of two different outlets?

       

      >
      >Or would they need to be on completely different circuit breakers?
      >
      >Or I could just wire it up to use the same plug my dryer uses I
      >suppose.
      >
      >And install a cheaper 1500W element for when things are hot enough.
      >
      >Hmmmm.... Wires.....
      >
      >
      >--- In new_distillers@y..., "Zeke Jones" wrote:
      > > two separate circuits
      >
      >


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    • Zeke Jones
      Two scenarios.... 1...I am intoxicated... 2...This (as unbelieveable as it is) went over Mike s head...: ) ... Protect your PC - Click here for McAfee.com
      Message 2 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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        Two scenarios....

        1...I am intoxicated...

        2...This (as unbelieveable as it is) went over Mike's head...:>)

        >From: "Mike Nixon"
        >To:
        >Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
        >Date: Fri, 8 Nov 2002 09:32:27 +1300
        >
        >orgulasmaggot wrote:
        >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
        >
        >If I use the 220V 4500W element I've been eyeing (ca 45$! Easy to
        >remember), I thought to dual plug it in to my 110V service and then,
        >once it's up to temperatures near what I want, unplug one and drop down
        >to about a 1500W level. Isn't that the way this sort of thing works.
        >===========================
        >The power will drop to a quarter when you plug a 240V 4500W rated element into 110V, down to 1125W.
        >This is an established technique and works very well. Plugs and sockets for the two different voltages are different shapes (so you don't inadvertently plug something rated at 110V into a 220V socket), so the neatest, easiest and safest way to get dual voltage control is to make a small adaptor lead with a 220V socket on one end and a 110V plug on the other. Use this adaptor lead when you want to change down to 1125W.
        >
        >Mike N
        >


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      • peter_vcb
        James, if it is plugged into the 220V socket it will be drawing over 20A. you will need thick cable rated to this. make sure your supply can handle this. i had
        Message 3 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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          James,
          if it is plugged into the 220V socket it will be drawing over 20A.
          you will need thick cable rated to this. make sure your supply can
          handle this. i had 2x2.8kW elements on mine



          --- In new_distillers@y..., "Mike Nixon" <mike@s...> wrote:
          > orgulasmaggot wrote:
          > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
          >
          > If I use the 220V 4500W element I've been eyeing (ca 45$! Easy to
          > remember), I thought to dual plug it in to my 110V service and
          then,
          > once it's up to temperatures near what I want, unplug one and drop
          down
          > to about a 1500W level. Isn't that the way this sort of thing
          works.
          > ===========================
          > The power will drop to a quarter when you plug a 240V 4500W rated
          element into 110V, down to 1125W.
          > This is an established technique and works very well. Plugs and
          sockets for the two different voltages are different shapes (so you
          don't inadvertently plug something rated at 110V into a 220V socket),
          so the neatest, easiest and safest way to get dual voltage control is
          to make a small adaptor lead with a 220V socket on one end and a 110V
          plug on the other. Use this adaptor lead when you want to change
          down to 1125W.
          >
          > Mike N
        • Proko
          ... I m not sure I m with either of you! Dual plugging at 110volts will still only suppl 110v, current will increase, but the voltage will remain the same.
          Message 4 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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            --- In new_distillers@y..., "Zeke Jones" <joneszeke@h...> wrote:
            >
            I'm not sure I'm with either of you! Dual plugging at 110volts will
            still only suppl 110v, current will increase, but the voltage will
            remain the same. Dual plugging, I take it, is a parallel connection.
            A series connection will double the voltage but I wouldn't suggest
            doing this within a state's power supply let alone a household. Mind
            you, I've been partaking in a few samples of the wares tonight so
            I'm not too sure if I may have missed the point!! Cheers anyway!
          • Zeke Jones
            Combining two separate 110v circuits,in parallel,directly from your breaker/fuse box will provide a 220v circuit...I have used this method in old houses to
            Message 5 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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              Combining two separate 110v circuits,in parallel,directly from your breaker/fuse box will provide a 220v circuit...I have used this method in old houses to supply power to water heaters,space heaters etc that required 220v when no 220v circuits were available...also used this scheme to power a 220v/110v outlet for a 'fake' fireplace,which required 220v for the heat and 110v for the light and motor to provide the 'flicker' effect.....it DOES work....:>)

              >From: "Proko"
              >Reply-To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
              >Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 12:15:01 -0000
              >
              >--- In new_distillers@y..., "Zeke Jones" wrote:
              > >
              >I'm not sure I'm with either of you! Dual plugging at 110volts will
              >still only suppl 110v, current will increase, but the voltage will
              >remain the same. Dual plugging, I take it, is a parallel connection.
              >A series connection will double the voltage but I wouldn't suggest
              >doing this within a state's power supply let alone a household. Mind
              >you, I've been partaking in a few samples of the wares tonight so
              >I'm not too sure if I may have missed the point!! Cheers anyway!
              >


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            • Mike Nixon
              Zeke Jones wrote: Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V) Two scenarios.... 1...I am intoxicated... 2...This (as unbelieveable as it is) went
              Message 6 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                Zeke Jones wrote:
                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)

                Two scenarios....
                1...I am intoxicated...
                2...This (as unbelieveable as it is) went over Mike's head...:>)

                >orgulasmaggot wrote:
                >Subject:
                [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
                >
                >If I use the 220V
                4500W element I've been eyeing (ca 45$! Easy to
                >remember), I thought to
                dual plug it in to my 110V service and then,
                >once it's up to
                temperatures near what I want, unplug one and drop down
                >to about a 1500W
                level. Isn't that the way this sort of thing works.
                >===========================
                >The power will drop to a quarter
                when you plug a 240V 4500W rated element into 110V, down to 1125W.
                >This
                is an established technique and works very well. Plugs and sockets for the two different voltages are different shapes (so you don't inadvertently plug something rated at 110V into a 220V socket), so the neatest, easiest and safest way to get dual voltage control is to make a small adaptor lead with a 220V socket on one end and a 110V plug on the other. Use this adaptor lead when you want to change down to 1125W.
                >
                >Mike N
                ============================
                A reply which apparently led to your quandary Zeke!  :-))
                You wrote today:
                You need two separate 110V circuits to get one 220V output....two outlets on the same 110V circuit will not equal 220V......its 'like' running two wires from one- 1.5V battery...you still get only 1.5V....also,I wouldnt recommend using outlets,its better to 'hardwire' your 220V circuit to a breaker box with (at least)two 110V breakers...run one to each element...when you want to shut-off one element,simply 'throw' one of the breakers....better yet...pay an electrician to do the job for you...good luck:>)
                 
                Are you telling us that you can simply wire two 110V AC power supplies together to get 240V?  I can well imagine that a single 240V supply is center-tapped on a transformer to provide two 110V circuits, and if you knew the house wiring layout then this could be done ... but how could you tell by just looking at the sockets whether two adjacent 110V sockets are supplied that way?  Being adjacent, is it not likely that they are wired in parallel and supplied from just one of the two 110V circuits?  What I was trying to get at by recommending an adaptor lead and using an existing, correctly installed 24V and 120V sockets, was that you should NOT try and mess with house wiring ... so I fully agree with you when you recommend paying a qualified electrician to do the job for you if you want to do that.  I know that some North American homes are wired with just 110V sockets, in which case a qualified electrician is the answer.  However, if your home comes with both 110V and 220V supply sockets, then the job has been done for you and you can safely use an adaptor cord to safely connect a 220V element to 110V, like so .....
                 
                220V Element ---- 220V plug ::                                               :: 220V wall socket
                220V Element ---- 220V plug :: 220V socket ===== 110V plug :: 110V wall socket
                 
                As Peter as prudently pointed out though:
                If it is plugged into the 220V socket it will be drawing over 20A. You will need thick cable rated to this. make sure your supply can
                handle this.
                Over in this part of the world and in Europe, 220-240V wiring is usually rated for only 10 amp (maximum 2.2 - 2.4 kW), and that may well be true too of North America.  The exception is wiring specifically put in to supply cookers or hot water supply cisterns, and this is much thicker grade cable.  So James, please follow Peter's advice and check the rating of your 220V wiring (check the circuit breaker).
                Plugging into 110V should not be a problem however, as the current drawn by that element would be just over 10 amp and low voltage wiring is usually designed to cope with more than that.  However ... just to be on the safe side, check that too!
                 
                Have I missed something Zeke?  More than happy to learn more about the mysteries of North American house wiring is I have :-))
                 
                All the best ... and join me in having another drink Mate!
                Mike N

              • Mike Nixon
                Zeke Jones Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V) Combining two separate 110v circuits,in parallel,directly from your breaker/fuse box will
                Message 7 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                  Zeke Jones
                  Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)

                  Combining two separate 110v circuits,in parallel,directly from your breaker/fuse box will provide a 220v circuit...I have used this method in old houses to supply power to water heaters,space heaters etc that required 220v when no 220v circuits were available...also used this scheme to power a 220v/110v outlet for a 'fake' fireplace,which required 220v for the heat and 110v for the light and motor to provide the 'flicker' effect.....it DOES work....:>)
                  =================
                  There you have it ... you know what you are doing with electrical circuits and so can safely dive directly into the main supply breaker/fuse box.  Not everyone has this advantage, and so any recommended method should be simple and safe for the "electrically challenged".  I know it CAN be done, but SHOULD it be done by anyone who thinks that a "fuse" is what you light and then retire rapidly to a safe distance?
                   
                  Mike N
                   
                • George
                  Mike Maybe I can help explain for everybody. In North America we have two 110 - 120 volt circuits. Line 1 and Line 2 is usually how they are marked. Each
                  Message 8 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                    Mike

                    Maybe I can help explain for everybody. In North America we have two
                    110 - 120 volt circuits. Line 1 and Line 2 is usually how they are
                    marked. Each line is 110 volts but they are 180 degrees out of syn.
                    When Line 1 is positive then at that time Line 2 is negative. They
                    switch 60 times a seconds for AC current. If you measure across the two
                    you will get a 220 - 240 volt reading. From one outlet you can get two
                    completely different 110 volts circuit or one 220 volt circuit which
                    could be wired up with 2 - 110 volts breakers or fuses. That is one on
                    Line 1 and another on Line 2. Our 220 has 3 wires, 2 hots and one common.

                    Hope this helps
                    George
                  • Reima
                    In US they seem to have power delivery from a delta transformer where one leg is 220V (Stinger) and the others 110V. So 110V leg to neutral (ground) = 110V and
                    Message 9 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                      In US they seem to have power delivery from a delta transformer where one leg is 220V (Stinger) and the others 110V.
                      So 110V leg to neutral (ground) = 110V and 220V between any of the 3-phases.
                      Cheers,
                      Reima
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2002 3:52 AM
                      Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)

                      Combining two separate 110v circuits,in parallel,directly from your breaker/fuse box will provide a 220v circuit...I have used this method in old houses to supply power to water heaters,space heaters etc that required 220v when no 220v circuits were available...also used this scheme to power a 220v/110v outlet for a 'fake' fireplace,which required 220v for the heat and 110v for the light and motor to provide the 'flicker' effect.....it DOES work....:>)

                      >From: "Proko"
                      >Reply-To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)
                      >Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 12:15:01 -0000
                      >
                      >--- In new_distillers@y..., "Zeke Jones" wrote:
                      > >
                      >I'm not sure I'm with either of you! Dual plugging at 110volts will
                      >still only suppl 110v, current will increase, but the voltage will
                      >remain the same. Dual plugging, I take it, is a parallel connection.
                      >A series connection will double the voltage but I wouldn't suggest
                      >doing this within a state's power supply let alone a household. Mind
                      >you, I've been partaking in a few samples of the wares tonight so
                      >I'm not too sure if I may have missed the point!! Cheers anyway!
                      >


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                    • Mike Nixon
                      Thanks George. A very clear explanation. Mike N ... From: George To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2002 12:05 PM Subject: Re:
                      Message 10 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                        Thanks George.  A very clear explanation.
                         
                        Mike N
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: George
                        Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2002 12:05 PM
                        Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: still (reply to John V)

                        Mike

                        Maybe I can help explain for everybody.  In North America we have two
                        110 - 120 volt circuits.  Line 1 and Line 2 is usually how they are
                        marked.  Each line is 110 volts but they are 180 degrees out of syn.
                        When Line 1 is positive then at that time Line 2 is negative.  They
                        switch 60 times a seconds for AC current.  If you measure across the two
                        you will get a 220 - 240 volt reading.  From one outlet you can get two
                        completely different 110 volts circuit or one 220 volt circuit which
                        could be wired up with 2 - 110 volts breakers or fuses. That is one on
                        Line 1 and another on Line 2.  Our 220 has 3 wires, 2 hots and one common.

                        Hope this helps
                        George


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                      • stillyaakman
                        I don t have anything to add except I recently wired my water heater boiler so i can switch between 240and 120 volts to drop the wattage after my initial heat
                        Message 11 of 28 , Nov 8, 2002
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                          I don't have anything to add except I recently wired my water heater
                          boiler so i can switch between 240and 120 volts to drop the wattage
                          after my initial heat up. I used a range (cooker) outlet and plug I
                          wired it normally for the 240v application and then made a jumper
                          cord with an outlet and plug. The L1 leg was joined with the neutral
                          (ground,earth) line so the two sockets that normally are hot in the
                          plug now have a hot and a neutral line. I also then eliminated the L1
                          prong on the plug so when it is plugged into the wall it doesn't
                          contact the hot L1 in the outlet.When my boiler comes up to temp. I
                          unplug it from the wall and into the jumper and the jumper into the
                          wall and go from 4500 watts to 1125 watts. Works just fine.
                          Cheers, Dan
                        • BOKAKOB
                          I want to have a go at making this but would appreciate the exact position on the drawing to place the thermometer. The thermometer is best located under the
                          Message 12 of 28 , Mar 20, 2003
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                            I want to have a go at making this but would appreciate the exact position on the drawing to place the thermometer.
                            The thermometer is best located under the top plate and above the bottom plate. This way the thermometer measures vapor temperature at the very top of the process and avoids returning reflux to cool it and through off the temperature reading.

                            Have you made this one yourself or did you make the type with the reducer.
                            I made this one and a few more that I did not publish. All of them work fine.

                            I note also that some of your pictures show a return  pipe T 'd off the take of pipe returning alcohol to the column. Is this the final design or do you favor the method shown in the drawing which has an over flow return inside? This seems logical.
                            The reason for a return branch outside of the separator is that it was easier for me to manufacture. Another thing to consider is that the amount of �overflow� or �return� alcohol is better when kept to an absolute minimum. Those pools of hot alcohol on top of columns, I learned, do not help distillation process. The design with a �T� contains the volume of � piping only. The overflow without this arrangement may have larger volume of alcohol pool depending on construction of plates.

                            Did you end up double winding the condenser or is one layer sufficient?
                            I use the same coil as shown on the photographs. It is sufficient for my particular needs and the amount of the output volume. With this coil and level of heat under the boiler I can achieve maximum non‑refluxed output of about 1.7L per hour. With the reflux it is approximately 0.4L � 0.5L per hour.

                             Blue <blue24@...> wrote:

                            Gooday, I have seen your design for   Elliptical in-Line Overflow Vertical Condenser Head.PDF and have printed of the drawing you have provided.....


                            I can be wrong I must say
                            Cheers, Alex...
                            A



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                          • vincero
                            Want to buy essential pro-series 11 still. From Brauhus in Calgary, is this the best way to go? Thank you.
                            Message 13 of 28 , May 23, 2006
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                              Want to buy "essential pro-series 11" still. From Brauhus in Calgary,
                              is this the best way to go?
                              Thank you.
                            • just me
                              I would recommend the essential extractor 2 pro series from brewhaus. it does a great job extracting essential oils. it works great with the 1100watt hot
                              Message 14 of 28 , Apr 10 5:41 PM
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                                I would recommend the essential extractor 2 pro series from brewhaus. it does a great job extracting essential oils. it works great with the 1100watt hot plate. don't use the diffuser plat if you use the hot plate.
                                 
                                just me
                                 
                                 
                                Contraceptive: An article to be worn on every conceivable occasion
                              • daddyman00126
                                I just bought the hot plate from brewhaus and have yet to try it on my 8 gallon pot. How big is your pot and what is your startup time like? The best for last
                                Message 15 of 28 , Apr 10 5:49 PM
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                                  I just bought the hot plate from brewhaus and have yet to try it on my
                                  8 gallon pot. How big is your pot and what is your startup time like?

                                  The best for last
                                  BILL1BURP


                                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "just me" <hifa222@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I would recommend the essential extractor 2 pro series from brewhaus.
                                  it does a great job extracting essential oils. it works great with the
                                  1100watt hot plate. don't use the diffuser plat if you use the hot
                                  plate.
                                  >
                                  > just me
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Contraceptive: An article to be worn on every conceivable occasion
                                  >
                                • just me
                                  hi bill, I have a 7.5 gallon. I am still playing with it. at four gallons it takes about fifty minutes. but I have made a lot of mistakes. keep the plate
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Apr 10 6:35 PM
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                                    hi bill,
                                    I have a 7.5 gallon. I am still playing with it. at four gallons it takes about fifty minutes. but I have made a lot of mistakes. keep the plate turned all the way up. I was trying to control it through bottom temp and condenser temp. I was using a 5 gallon bucket. I just moved up to a 32 gallon trash can. this lets me control through the condenser. I haven't tried a full run the right way. I have a tendency to jump in then read. the bad news is I make a lot of mistakes. the good news is I (hopefully) learn from them. though I could have read more and made life easier.
                                     
                                    just me
                                     
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                                  • pnmbalto@yahoo.com
                                    hello im new to this, i want to make a little corn product should i get a reflux or pot still? also need to know where to buy one. Thank You Mike
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Feb 25, 2012
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                                      hello
                                      im new to this, i want to make a little corn product should i get a reflux or pot still? also need to know where to buy one.
                                      Thank You
                                      Mike
                                    • White Bear
                                      Mike-   You said you just want to make a little corn product so I guess that you are not concerned with the refinement of the product so my suggestion would
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Feb 25, 2012
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                                        Mike-
                                          You said you just want to make a little corn product so I guess that you are not concerned with the refinement of the product so my suggestion would be a pot still instead of a reflux still.  You must be careful with your timing on the separation process so you remove the foreshots before the heads start coming.  The foreshots contain the poisonous substances you definitely want to avoid in a corn product. 
                                          My best suggestion first off is to READ, READ, READ  everything you can get your hands on pertaining to this fun hobby.  Check out the files section and the archives (past posts) and get familiarized with the WHOLE process.  It is rather easy to do yourself and others harm, and we all know that puts a damper on this hobby.
                                        White Bear


                                         
                                        --- On Sat, 2/25/12, pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...> wrote:

                                        From: pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...>
                                        Subject: [new_distillers] still
                                        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 2:27 PM

                                         
                                        hello
                                        im new to this, i want to make a little corn product should i get a reflux or pot still? also need to know where to buy one.
                                        Thank You
                                        Mike

                                      • pnmbalto
                                        White Bear Thanks for the reply I dont know what forshots or heads are yet but ill keep reading do you think a thumper would be a safer way to go? i thought a
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Feb 25, 2012
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                                          White Bear
                                          Thanks for the reply I dont know what forshots or heads are yet but ill keep reading do you think a thumper would be a safer way to go? i thought a 10 or 15 gal.. unit would be a good way to start
                                          Thanks Again
                                          Mike
                                          --- On Sat, 2/25/12, White Bear <sha_man_1@...> wrote:

                                          From: White Bear <sha_man_1@...>
                                          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] still
                                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 8:25 PM

                                           
                                          Mike-
                                            You said you just want to make a little corn product so I guess that you are not concerned with the refinement of the product so my suggestion would be a pot still instead of a reflux still.  You must be careful with your timing on the separation process so you remove the foreshots before the heads start coming.  The foreshots contain the poisonous substances you definitely want to avoid in a corn product. 
                                            My best suggestion first off is to READ, READ, READ  everything you can get your hands on pertaining to this fun hobby.  Check out the files section and the archives (past posts) and get familiarized with the WHOLE process.  It is rather easy to do yourself and others harm, and we all know that puts a damper on this hobby.
                                          White Bear


                                           
                                          --- On Sat, 2/25/12, pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...> wrote:

                                          From: pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...>
                                          Subject: [new_distillers] still
                                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 2:27 PM

                                           
                                          hello
                                          im new to this, i want to make a little corn product should i get a reflux or pot still? also need to know where to buy one.
                                          Thank You
                                          Mike

                                        • White Bear
                                          Mike-   Here again you need to ask yourself do I want to use/build/buy a reflux still or a pot still.  I am assuming by your answer - pertaining to a
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Feb 27, 2012
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                                            Mike-
                                              Here again you need to ask yourself do I want to use/build/buy a reflux still or a pot still.  I am assuming by your answer - pertaining to a thumper, that you are considering a pot still.  A thumper is not used on a reflux still as the refinement all occurs in the column.  The thumper on a pot still does the same thing, roughly, it refines the vapor and through consequent runs you get a higher ABV ( alcohol by volume)
                                              when you distill a mash or a wash, mainly one made out of grain, your first collection from the still will be your fore-shots.  This bit will contain most of the lower temp volatiles such as methanol ( a poison) and phenol acetate also bad.  the next to come are the heads. this contains some phenol acetate and most of the flavor of the mash.  Further distillations will give you the middle runs or what you collect to drink and the tails which contain various oils, some mid-run and water.  This is a quick run-down of the contents of each cut, there are other volitiles in each which I will not try to confuse you with.
                                              The trick with a pot still is to know (through experience) when to switch containers for each of the cuts during a run.  Also what/when to dump the thumper contents and refill with the various cuts to purify your drinking alcohol.
                                              As I said in the last post - get as much information from where ever you can and READ, READ, READ.  Ask questions and experiment with a small batch still.  The people here on this group are fantastic in their knowledge and are happy to help you as you go along.  Be well.
                                            White Bear


                                            --- On Sat, 2/25/12, pnmbalto <pnmbalto@...> wrote:

                                            From: pnmbalto <pnmbalto@...>
                                            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] still
                                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 11:20 PM

                                             
                                            White Bear
                                            Thanks for the reply I dont know what forshots or heads are yet but ill keep reading do you think a thumper would be a safer way to go? i thought a 10 or 15 gal.. unit would be a good way to start
                                            Thanks Again
                                            Mike
                                            --- On Sat, 2/25/12, White Bear <sha_man_1@...> wrote:

                                            From: White Bear <sha_man_1@...>
                                            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] still
                                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 8:25 PM

                                             
                                            Mike-
                                              You said you just want to make a little corn product so I guess that you are not concerned with the refinement of the product so my suggestion would be a pot still instead of a reflux still.  You must be careful with your timing on the separation process so you remove the foreshots before the heads start coming.  The foreshots contain the poisonous substances you definitely want to avoid in a corn product. 
                                              My best suggestion first off is to READ, READ, READ  everything you can get your hands on pertaining to this fun hobby.  Check out the files section and the archives (past posts) and get familiarized with the WHOLE process.  It is rather easy to do yourself and others harm, and we all know that puts a damper on this hobby.
                                            White Bear


                                             
                                            --- On Sat, 2/25/12, pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...> wrote:

                                            From: pnmbalto@... <pnmbalto@...>
                                            Subject: [new_distillers] still
                                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012, 2:27 PM

                                             
                                            hello
                                            im new to this, i want to make a little corn product should i get a reflux or pot still? also need to know where to buy one.
                                            Thank You
                                            Mike

                                          • pnmbalto
                                            White Bear Thanks for your info. Mike
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Feb 27, 2012
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                                              White Bear
                                              Thanks for your info.
                                              Mike
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