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Re: [new_distillers] Triac controllers

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  • Mike Nixon
    Robert Stam wrote: Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Triac controllers Hi Mike, I have a 6VDC 1000mA charger for my old cellphone, could I use that do you think,
    Message 1 of 21 , Oct 2, 2002
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      Robert Stam wrote:
      Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Triac controllers

      Hi Mike, I have a 6VDC 1000mA charger for my old cellphone, could I use that do you think, instead of the 6V battery power supply? Failing that, I also have a 5V power supply out of an old network switch, will 5V work with these components?
      ============================
      Hi Rob,
       
      I can think of no reason why you shouldn't be able to use either one.  The control side chip is CMOS and works fine at lower voltages.  6V was selected as it's convenient if using ordinary batteries.  That side of the circuit draws only tiny amounts of current.
       
      Cheers,
      Mike N
    • Reima
      Good one Mike. Why don t you post the wiring diagram as well, I am sure that a few of us will play around with it. I should add that I do not really need my
      Message 2 of 21 , Oct 3, 2002
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        Good one Mike.
        Why don't you post the wiring diagram as well, I am sure that a few of us will play around with it.
        I should add that I do not really need my Triac controller since I run my 2 x 1,2kW heaters in parallel first to warm up and then I switch on either one only or both in series depending on my heat load and then usually fine-adjust with cooling water.
        It was just fun to make one .-)
        For those interested in just using 2 heaters and 15 Amp switches, check Tony's site under controllers.
         
        Reima
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2002 11:42 AM
        Subject: [new_distillers] Triac controllers

        The circuit posted by Reima and John is a a good example of a well designed phase controlled triac, but is inherently 'noisy'.  The CR components shown connected by dotted lines on the right of the schematic will damp some of the RFI, but will be hard pressed to do a complete job at the currents we use.  If you choose to make this circuit, it will help a lot to keep those connections as short as possible. 
         
        An alternative means of control is by using burst fire techniques.  The circuit below uses a zero crossing trigger so that only full cycles of the power supply are used, so minimising the sharp current ramps that cause radiation.  No zero crossing device ever switches at precisely zero voltage, so the RF choke and small decoupling capacitor are added as belts and braces.  You may choose to leave them out as any radiation will be small and localised.  Another advantage of this circuit is that the controller, which is battery powered, may be connected to the power switch (the trigger/triac combination) by a simple lead, so keeping you well away from mains power supplies.  By the way, the triacs shown (the 240V and the 120V versions) are both rated to handle up to 60 amp.  The duty cycle is around 2 seconds with the components shown, red LED being on when power flows and the green LED on when power does not.  By varying the on/off ratio in the duty cycle, you vary the mean power delivered to the load.
         
        If anyone is interested in this option, I will be happy to post a wiring diagram.
         
        Mike Nixon


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      • r ryner
        Just a quick note on safety. The cooling explained in earlier posts is called a heatsink and to be safe should be electrically isolated from the triac and the
        Message 3 of 21 , Oct 3, 2002
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          Just a quick note on safety. The cooling explained in earlier posts is called a heatsink and to be safe should be electrically isolated from the triac and the case of your controller earthed. A standard power point in australia is only made to deliver 10Amps so thats about a 2.5 kilowatt heater. a fuse of suitable capacity should be inserted in the active line feed to your heater again for safety. The safeest way to run your heating controller is to use an earth leakage circuit breaker, or RCD, these are standard in aussie homes built today so you should be OK.

          I only mention this for your own safety as i love the brewing of my own spirits.

          Be safe and distill your hearts out.

          Regards

          Richie

          PS. has anyone else tried the new 24 hour yeasts, they rock.

          --

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        • John Vandermeulen
          Hello Reima, would you provide Chapter, page, for the two heaters/switches please? I did go through Tony s website, but can t find the mention of it. John V
          Message 4 of 21 , Oct 3, 2002
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            Hello Reima,
            would you provide Chapter, page, for the two heaters/switches please? I
            did go through Tony's website, but can't find the mention of it.
            John V

            Reima wrote:

            > Good one Mike.Why don't you post the wiring diagram as well, I am sure
            > that a few of us will play around with it.I should add that I do not
            > really need my Triac controller since I run my 2 x 1,2kW heaters in
            > parallel first to warm up and then I switch on either one only or both in
            > series depending on my heat load and then usually fine-adjust with
            > cooling water.It was just fun to make one .-)For those interested in just
            > using 2 heaters and 15 Amp switches, check Tony's site under
            > controllers. Reima ----- Original Message -----
            >
            > From: Mike Nixon
            > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2002 11:42 AM
            > Subject: [new_distillers] Triac controllers
            > The circuit posted by Reima and John is a a good example of a
            > well designed phase controlled triac, but is inherently
            > 'noisy'. The CR components shown connected by dotted lines on
            > the right of the schematic will damp some of the RFI, but will
            > be hard pressed to do a complete job at the currents we use.
            > If you choose to make this circuit, it will help a lot to keep
            > those connections as short as possible. An alternative means of
            > control is by using burst fire techniques. The circuit below
            > uses a zero crossing trigger so that only full cycles of the
            > power supply are used, so minimising the sharp current ramps
            > that cause radiation. No zero crossing device ever switches at
            > precisely zero voltage, so the RF choke and small decoupling
            > capacitor are added as belts and braces. You may choose to
            > leave them out as any radiation will be small and localised.
            > Another advantage of this circuit is that the controller, which
            > is battery powered, may be connected to the power switch (the
            > trigger/triac combination) by a simple lead, so keeping you
            > well away from mains power supplies. By the way, the triacs
            > shown (the 240V and the 120V versions) are both rated to handle
            > up to 60 amp. The duty cycle is around 2 seconds with the
            > components shown, red LED being on when power flows and the
            > green LED on when power does not. By varying the on/off ratio
            > in the duty cycle, you vary the mean power delivered to the
            > load. If anyone is interested in this option, I will be happy
            > to post a wiring diagram. Mike Nixon
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            > Service.
            >
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            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • Reima
            OK no worries John, I send you the original. Forget the 240V same result whatever you put in and the 0,1kW heater is too lousy anyway and I have taken it out.
            Message 5 of 21 , Oct 3, 2002
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              OK no worries John, I send you the original. Forget the 240V same result whatever you put in and the 0,1kW heater is too lousy anyway and I have taken it out. You can easily over ride it with more or less cooling water. Just cross over the light dimmer and the 0,1kW and use the rest of wiring diagram.
              Cheers
              Reima
               
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2002 11:16 PM
              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Triac controllers

              Hello Reima,
              would you provide Chapter, page, for the two heaters/switches please?  I
              did go through Tony's website, but can't find the mention of it.
              John V

            • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
              John, ... See http://homedistiller.org/control.htm (right at the bottom of the page). Via the new menu, this is Equipment - Making.. - Control Systems
              Message 6 of 21 , Oct 3, 2002
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                John,

                > Hello Reima,
                > would you provide Chapter, page, for the two heaters/switches
                > please? I
                > did go through Tony's website, but can't find the mention of it.

                See http://homedistiller.org/control.htm (right at the bottom of the page).

                Via the new menu, this is "Equipment" - "Making.." - "Control Systems"

                Tony
              • Shane Kirkman
                Hi Mike could you please send me the diagram. Eat-Drink-Smoke and be Happy. Shane. ... From: Mike Nixon To:
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 14, 2003
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                  Hi Mike could you please send me the diagram.
                   
                   
                                                     
                   

                  Eat-Drink-Smoke and be Happy.
                  Shane.
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Mike Nixon" <mike@...>
                  Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2002 11:42 AM
                  Subject: [new_distillers] Triac controllers

                  > edit.< 

                  An alternative means of control is by using burst fire techniques.  The circuit below uses a zero crossing trigger so that only full cycles of the power supply are used, so minimising the sharp current ramps that cause radiation.  No zero crossing device ever switches at precisely zero voltage, so the RF choke and small decoupling capacitor are added as belts and braces.  You may choose to leave them out as any radiation will be small and localised.  Another advantage of this circuit is that the controller, which is battery powered, may be connected to the power switch (the trigger/triac combination) by a simple lead, so keeping you well away from mains power supplies.  By the way, the triacs shown (the 240V and the 120V versions) are both rated to handle up to 60 amp.  The duty cycle is around 2 seconds with the components shown, red LED being on when power flows and the green LED on when power does not.  By varying the on/off ratio in the duty cycle, you vary the mean power delivered to the load.

                  If anyone is interested in this option, I will be happy to post a wiring diagram.

                  Mike Nixon

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