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making "cointreau"

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  • Thomas Hart
    Howdy- I m new in these parts, but not to this mad pursuit. I look forward to many future exchanges. Recently Lynn mentioned an interested in Cointreau. I
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2001
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      Howdy-

      I'm new in these parts, but not to this mad pursuit. I look forward to many
      future exchanges.

      Recently Lynn mentioned an interested in Cointreau. I have had success
      making orange essence as follows:

      Place a tall shot glass upside down in the bottom of a wide-mouthed glass
      jar.

      Pour neutral spirits into the jar to just below the top (once the bottom) of
      the shot glass. High proof spirits gets good results.

      Place a good quality, fresh, washed orange on the shot glass. It should sit
      just above the liquid level and not be touching it.

      Seal the jar and let the whole mess sit for a week or two (the wait pays
      off). During this time the alcohol will cause the oils in the orange to
      sweat out and be pickup by the liquor. For stronger flavor, repeat with
      another orange.

      Decant the liquor and process as you please with sugar or whatever you wish.

      This is not exactly Cointreau but very nice in all sorts of beverages.

      Hope this helps.

      Ain't life a kick?

      Peace-
      the Stillpastor
    • Lynne
      ... Thanks for this - coincidentally I have a fresh supply of 85% downstairs, so am looking forward to trying it. As for not exactly cointreau , after the
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4, 2001
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        At 12:24 PM 4/4/01 -0600, you wrote:
        >Howdy-
        >
        >I'm new in these parts, but not to this mad pursuit. I look forward to many
        >future exchanges.
        >
        >Recently Lynn mentioned an interested in Cointreau. I have had success
        >making orange essence as follows:

        Thanks for this - coincidentally I have a fresh supply of 85% downstairs,
        so am looking forward to trying it. As for "not exactly cointreau", after
        the success of the homemade gin essence I quickly discarded the notion that
        whatever I made had to be an exact replica of a commercial product to be
        any good.

        I don't suppose anyone has a recipe for something resembling jagermeister
        ... ? If I get that, I'll have my 3 pet 'poisons' covered; or 4, if you
        count vodka ...

        Cheers,
        Lynne
      • ups474@aol.com
        According to commercial literature, Jagermeister is a bitters not a liqueur, and it has: anise, poppy seed, juniper, and ginseng in it (Spirits &Cocktails,
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 5, 2001
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          According to commercial literature, Jagermeister is a bitters not a liqueur,
          and it has:
          anise, poppy seed, juniper, and ginseng in it (Spirits &Cocktails, Dave
          Broom, Carlton publishing, 1998) What amounts these are in, or if there is
          anything else, I don't know. Another unknown is the base spirit used to make
          it (brandy, grain alcohol, rum, etc). I tried a while ago, but after a nasty
          Jager-inspired hangover, I no longer drink it. My one experiment shows that
          poppy seeds leave an oily residue on the surface of the alcohol they are
          soaked in. I hope this ingredient list may help- Good luck!
        • Kev
          ... success ... Thanks for that, Tom - I m off to get a couple of good oranges this weekend :-) ... notion that ... to be ... Yep, I m with you all the way on
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5, 2001
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            > >Recently Lynn mentioned an interested in Cointreau. I have had
            success
            > >making orange essence as follows:

            Thanks for that, Tom - I'm off to get a couple of good oranges this
            weekend :-)

            >As for "not exactly cointreau", after
            > the success of the homemade gin essence I quickly discarded the
            notion that
            > whatever I made had to be an exact replica of a commercial product
            to be
            > any good.

            Yep, I'm with you all the way on that one, Lynne. If it tastes good,
            drink it! You can see the family resemblance between commercial gin
            and the stuff produced with that other recipe, but the home made
            stuff is much, much tastier. I'm looking forward to trying this new
            recipe, too.

            For me, the missing poison is bourbon. I must have tried every
            bourbon essence on the market and the best I've come up with so far
            is the Jack Daniels soaker chips. Maybe I'm just too impatiant to let
            the flavours develop properly...

            Kev.
          • ups474@aol.com
            bourbon isn t a difficult drink to make. Just use some of the artificial aging methods to speed things up. Heating and cooling the spirit while in contact
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5, 2001
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              bourbon isn't a difficult drink to make. Just use some of the artificial
              aging methods to speed things up. Heating and cooling the spirit while in
              contact with the wood in fairly rapid cycles speeds things up (one hot cool
              cycle is equivalent to one day of aging). Bubbling air through the spirit
              also has been shown to help. By the way, here's a good recipe to try- 50%
              corn, 30%rye, 20% 6row barley- just brew an all grain style batch of beer
              without adding hops. If you have no interest or knowledge about all grain
              brewing try this: Boil for 1 hour in 2.5gallons of water: 3/4 lb of yellow
              cornmeal and 1/4lb flaked rye. After this boiling time add in ten pounds of
              sugar and stir until it dissolves, then add another 2 gallons of cool water
              to it to bring the temp down fast, then pitch your yeast. Sourdough bread
              yeast is good for this recipe. After it's done, pour it through a window
              screen (or something similar) to catch the grain and prevent it from getting
              in the still, then run it to about 70 to 80%abv. age it and water it down
              however you like.
            • Kev
              Thanks! That s what I love about all this, there s always something new to learn - and taste! I ll try your suggestions out. I think the main problem I have
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 5, 2001
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                Thanks! That's what I love about all this, there's always something
                new to learn - and taste!

                I'll try your suggestions out. I think the main problem I have with
                bourbon essences is the burnt sugar taste they all seem to have. I'd
                rather have a drink that tasted like bourbon and not necessarily
                looked like it. I wouldn't care if it was bright green as long as it
                tasted OK!

                Kev.
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