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Polish Plum Brandy

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  • goldenshine65802
    Hi John and to all interested, I got tired of looking on the Net, So I desided to see if I could call in a few favors from a few good old boys in the business,
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2002
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      Hi John and to all interested, I got tired of looking on the Net, So I desided to see if I could call in a few favors from a few good old boys in the business, after talking to them I got a locataion of a old Polish man in Virgina that makes Plum brandy. His outfit is done with steam heat, simular to what I'm building, only his boiler jacketed still can produce 3 gallons of low wines in a hour and then he redistills for a second time bringing the brandy up to 45% alcohol then makes a final run at 75% this is a clear white brandy and is then put in unchared white oak barrels, and it is aged only for a month or two. Much like our Shine here in the south only it gets put in good oak barrels and not cheap milk jugs. A practice that I do not follow as plastic can and does leach, At any rate he was not very spesific on what he uses, but he did say that He uses 18 pounds of plums if he makes a small Batch, he does not use sugar and ferments the pulp after removing the pits. He does use a pictin enzyme and a wine yeast that only goes as high as 15% He didn't say what it was, only that If I was to make some not to add a sulfate and to use very little yeast Starter. I don't know if this will be of any help , but he does not remove he skins either. Well good luck to all.
    • ups474@aol.com
      Having just read a section of a technical manual about distilling on the flavors of whiskey- I think I know why the old polish plum distiller uses very little
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 2, 2002
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        Having just read a section of a technical manual about distilling on the
        flavors of whiskey- I think I know why the old polish plum distiller uses
        very little yeast, and why the slivovitz post from John V. mentioned aging
        the plum wine for a long time before distilling it. Appearantly, over the
        last 20 years research has proven that the majority of flavor compounds in
        whiskey come from the yeast that is used. The aldehydes that the yeast
        contributes turn into esters on long aging. These halp to provide a better
        flavor for the whisky. In a fruit brandy (like plums)- this would mar the
        flavor of the fruit- It may make it more complex if it were aged on oak for a
        while- but for those attempting to make a clear slivovitz/schnaps type of
        spirit- the yeast would give flavors that prevent the pure plum flavor from
        coming through. I guess another rule for fruit brandy/schnaps has got to be:
        Let the wine clarify fully before distilling- no distilling on the lees!.
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