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Greetings & Q's from newbie

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  • tom bombadilo
    hello folks,   firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.   i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).   i have been quite
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 25 7:02 AM
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      hello folks,
       
      firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
       
      i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
       
      i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
       
      however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
       
      sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
       
      i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
       
      the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
       
      this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
       
      do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
       
      i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
       
      the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
       
      one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
       
      the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
      I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
       
      Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

      Thanks in advance for any replies.
      When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
       
      Cheers
      Tom
       
    • Paulo Jurza
      Hi Bombadill! I am from Brasil, new here too. I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it! Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes -
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 26 7:58 AM
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        Hi Bombadill!

        I am from Brasil, new here too.

        I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it!

        Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes - are these pipes the ones that carry water to cool down the worm - if they are, no problem.

        But the spirits should not pass thru (thou shall not pass! hehehe - nerd joke) plastic, nor fall down of the tap into plastic - high grades of alcool corrode the plastic, and could be smelly, foggy or poisonous.

        So, use copper if you can - copper really reacts with sulfur compounds and diminishes them.

        But you have to remember to maintain them clean, or your distillate will turn bluish, and harmfull.

        Good luck!

        Regards, 



        2014-08-25 11:02 GMT-03:00 tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>:
         

        hello folks,
         
        firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
         
        i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
         
        i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
         
        however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
         
        sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
         
        i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
         
        the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
         
        this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
         
        do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
         
        i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
         
        the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
         
        one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
         
        the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
        I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
         
        Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

        Thanks in advance for any replies.
        When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
         
        Cheers
        Tom
         


      • tom bombadilo
        thank you jurza. i understand the theory of copper to remove sulphurs. the pvc was used for the spirit not the water. i have seen silicon tubing designed for
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 27 2:00 AM
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          thank you jurza.


          i understand the theory of copper to remove sulphurs.

          the pvc was used for the spirit not the water.

          i have seen silicon tubing designed for high temperatures in brewing could these be used or would the spirit corrode this as well ?

          it will be difficult to join the copper pipe to the glass worm i'm worried the copper may crush the glass - any ideas ?

          Namaarie  (more nerdiness)

          Tom





          On Tuesday, 26 August 2014, 22:27, "Paulo Jurza paulo.jurza@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Hi Bombadill!

          I am from Brasil, new here too.

          I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it!

          Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes - are these pipes the ones that carry water to cool down the worm - if they are, no problem.

          But the spirits should not pass thru (thou shall not pass! hehehe - nerd joke) plastic, nor fall down of the tap into plastic - high grades of alcool corrode the plastic, and could be smelly, foggy or poisonous.

          So, use copper if you can - copper really reacts with sulfur compounds and diminishes them.

          But you have to remember to maintain them clean, or your distillate will turn bluish, and harmfull.

          Good luck!

          Regards, 



          2014-08-25 11:02 GMT-03:00 tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>:
           
          hello folks,
           
          firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
           
          i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
           
          i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
           
          however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
           
          sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
           
          i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
           
          the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
           
          this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
           
          do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
           
          i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
           
          the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
           
          one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
           
          the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
          I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
           
          Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

          Thanks in advance for any replies.
          When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
           
          Cheers
          Tom
           



        • RLB
          In just my opinion, and plastic in any distilling process is a mistake. Glass worm?  A $30 coil of copper, sand and a round pipe will build you a better
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 27 2:17 PM
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            In just my opinion, and plastic in any distilling process is a mistake.

            Glass worm?  A $30 coil of copper, sand and a round pipe will build you a better worn.  Heck! you can buy a copper beer cooling coil for less than $100, so why a glass worm?

            Use Stainless Steel or copper.

            Robert


            From: "tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
            To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:00 AM
            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Greetings & Q's from newbie

             
            thank you jurza.


            i understand the theory of copper to remove sulphurs.

            the pvc was used for the spirit not the water.

            i have seen silicon tubing designed for high temperatures in brewing could these be used or would the spirit corrode this as well ?

            it will be difficult to join the copper pipe to the glass worm i'm worried the copper may crush the glass - any ideas ?

            Namaarie  (more nerdiness)

            Tom





            On Tuesday, 26 August 2014, 22:27, "Paulo Jurza paulo.jurza@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


             
            Hi Bombadill!

            I am from Brasil, new here too.

            I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it!

            Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes - are these pipes the ones that carry water to cool down the worm - if they are, no problem.

            But the spirits should not pass thru (thou shall not pass! hehehe - nerd joke) plastic, nor fall down of the tap into plastic - high grades of alcool corrode the plastic, and could be smelly, foggy or poisonous.

            So, use copper if you can - copper really reacts with sulfur compounds and diminishes them.

            But you have to remember to maintain them clean, or your distillate will turn bluish, and harmfull.

            Good luck!

            Regards, 



            2014-08-25 11:02 GMT-03:00 tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>:
             
            hello folks,
             
            firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
             
            i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
             
            i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
             
            however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
             
            sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
             
            i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
             
            the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
             
            this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
             
            do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
             
            i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
             
            the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
             
            one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
             
            the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
            I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
             
            Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

            Thanks in advance for any replies.
            When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
             
            Cheers
            Tom
             





          • tom bombadilo
            The reason for a glass worm..... it was free along with the stainless steel pot. Both were surplus to requirements in a lab. So how do i attach a copper pipe
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 29 3:26 AM
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              The reason for a glass worm..... it was free along with the stainless steel pot. Both were surplus to requirements in a lab.
              So how do i attach a copper pipe to glass?

              Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

              From:"RLB last2blast@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
              Date:Wed, 27 Aug, 2014 at 22:18
              Subject:Re: [new_distillers] Greetings & Q's from newbie

               

              In just my opinion, and plastic in any distilling process is a mistake.

              Glass worm?  A $30 coil of copper, sand and a round pipe will build you a better worn.  Heck! you can buy a copper beer cooling coil for less than $100, so why a glass worm?

              Use Stainless Steel or copper.

              Robert


              From: "tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
              To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:00 AM
              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Greetings & Q's from newbie

               
              thank you jurza.


              i understand the theory of copper to remove sulphurs.

              the pvc was used for the spirit not the water.

              i have seen silicon tubing designed for high temperatures in brewing could these be used or would the spirit corrode this as well ?

              it will be difficult to join the copper pipe to the glass worm i'm worried the copper may crush the glass - any ideas ?

              Namaarie  (more nerdiness)

              Tom





              On Tuesday, 26 August 2014, 22:27, "Paulo Jurza paulo.jurza@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              Hi Bombadill!

              I am from Brasil, new here too.

              I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it!

              Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes - are these pipes the ones that carry water to cool down the worm - if they are, no problem.

              But the spirits should not pass thru (thou shall not pass! hehehe - nerd joke) plastic, nor fall down of the tap into plastic - high grades of alcool corrode the plastic, and could be smelly, foggy or poisonous.

              So, use copper if you can - copper really reacts with sulfur compounds and diminishes them.

              But you have to remember to maintain them clean, or your distillate will turn bluish, and harmfull.

              Good luck!

              Regards, 



              2014-08-25 11:02 GMT-03:00 tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>:
               
              hello folks,
               
              firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
               
              i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
               
              i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
               
              however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
               
              sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
               
              i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
               
              the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
               
              this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
               
              do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
               
              i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
               
              the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
               
              one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
               
              the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
              I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
               
              Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

              Thanks in advance for any replies.
              When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
               
              Cheers
              Tom
               





            • RLB
              Lack of proper information prevents me from being able to provide any reasonable answer to this question. 1) What is the I.D and O.D. of both? I would be
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 29 3:29 PM
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                Lack of proper information prevents me from being able to provide any reasonable answer to this question.

                1) What is the I.D and O.D. of both?

                I would be surprised if they are of similar size.  I for one would contact a lab equipment and ask them what they have in stock that would resolve this problem.

                I personally would forget using a glass worm.  Sounds more of a headache then a solution to a problem.

                Robert


                From: "tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 6:26 AM
                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Greetings & Q's from newbie

                 
                The reason for a glass worm..... it was free along with the stainless steel pot. Both were surplus to requirements in a lab.
                So how do i attach a copper pipe to glass?
                From:"RLB last2blast@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                Date:Wed, 27 Aug, 2014 at 22:18
                Subject:Re: [new_distillers] Greetings Q's from newbie

                 
                In just my opinion, and plastic in any distilling process is a mistake.

                Glass worm?  A $30 coil of copper, sand and a round pipe will build you a better worn.  Heck! you can buy a copper beer cooling coil for less than $100, so why a glass worm?

                Use Stainless Steel or copper.

                Robert




                From: "tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:00 AM
                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Greetings Q's from newbie

                 
                thank you jurza.


                i understand the theory of copper to remove sulphurs.

                the pvc was used for the spirit not the water.

                i have seen silicon tubing designed for high temperatures in brewing could these be used or would the spirit corrode this as well ?

                it will be difficult to join the copper pipe to the glass worm i'm worried the copper may crush the glass - any ideas ?

                Namaarie  (more nerdiness)

                Tom





                On Tuesday, 26 August 2014, 22:27, "Paulo Jurza paulo.jurza@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                 
                Hi Bombadill!

                I am from Brasil, new here too.

                I am fermenting a jar of Plums to make slivovitz - I love it!

                Well, you said that your glass worm has pvc pipes - are these pipes the ones that carry water to cool down the worm - if they are, no problem.

                But the spirits should not pass thru (thou shall not pass! hehehe - nerd joke) plastic, nor fall down of the tap into plastic - high grades of alcool corrode the plastic, and could be smelly, foggy or poisonous.

                So, use copper if you can - copper really reacts with sulfur compounds and diminishes them.

                But you have to remember to maintain them clean, or your distillate will turn bluish, and harmfull.

                Good luck!

                Regards, 



                2014-08-25 11:02 GMT-03:00 tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>:
                 
                hello folks,
                 
                firstly thanks for the wealth of info on here.
                 
                i am a cider maker based wales (thats hard cider for US readers).
                 
                i have been quite successful over the years and made several awarding winning ciders.
                 
                however each year there always some that does not meet the grade.
                 
                sometimes this gets mulled - but now i fancy making some Calvados.
                 
                i have been lucky enough to get myself a second-hand purpose-built stainless steel 60 litre still and glass worm from a friend who works in a lab.
                 
                the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
                 
                this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?
                 
                do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
                 
                i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.
                 
                the pot has two stainless steel pipes coming out of the lid.
                 
                one bent at 90 deg which will be ideal to attach the worm.
                 
                the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?
                I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.
                 
                Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

                Thanks in advance for any replies.
                When I work out how to post photos I’ll put some up.
                 
                Cheers
                Tom
                 







              • o1bigtenor
                On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 5:26 AM, tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@yahoo.co.uk ... Carefully! You have dissimilar materials with quite different coefficients of
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 30 4:32 AM
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                  On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 5:26 AM, tom bombadilo t_bombadilo@... [new_distillers] <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                  The reason for a glass worm..... it was free along with the stainless steel pot. Both were surplus to requirements in a lab.
                  So how do i attach a copper pipe to glass?

                  Carefully!

                  You have dissimilar materials with quite different coefficients of expansion.

                  With absolutely no experience in this art I would suggest looking at some high quality silicon tubing.
                  (High temperature capable, possible to find in FDA rated (think milk machine tubing), and flexible allowing for differential installation pressures and clamping.)

                  Dee

                • Zapata Vive
                  One point I d make about the use of silicon tubing is the risk of leaking. Not necessarily from degradation, just the ease of it popping off. An accidental
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 4, 2014
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                    One point I'd make about the use of silicon tubing is the risk of leaking. Not necessarily from degradation, just the ease of it "popping" off.  An accidental tug, trip or slip, and you've got a big flammable accident.

                    Personally I'd skip any soft tubing on a still for this reason alone, there simply aren't foolproof connections for hard to soft tubing.  Even the often used cooling water hose connections many use are suspect to me, it may be rare, but I've seen a hose come off even held down by a worm drive hose clamp (jubilee clip).  Hard plumbing lasts forever and is safer.

                    I say sell the glass piece to someone who wants it for lab use, and replace with copper/stainless which solves any issue with toxicity of materials as well as safety from accidental disconnections.

                    The best time to do it right is the first time.

                  • RLB
                    Also don t for get that copper can handle a bumps whereas glass can develop unseen cracks even from a slight bump. Hot vapor and cool water would shatter the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 4, 2014
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                      Also don't for get that copper can handle a bumps whereas glass can develop unseen cracks even from a slight bump.  Hot vapor and cool water would shatter the glass.  Free is not always easy or free in the end.

                      Robert


                      From: "Zapata Vive zapatavive@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Saturday, October 4, 2014 4:59 PM
                      Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Greetings & Q's from newbie

                       
                      One point I'd make about the use of silicon tubing is the risk of leaking. Not necessarily from degradation, just the ease of it "popping" off.  An accidental tug, trip or slip, and you've got a big flammable accident.
                      Personally I'd skip any soft tubing on a still for this reason alone, there simply aren't foolproof connections for hard to soft tubing.  Even the often used cooling water hose connections many use are suspect to me, it may be rare, but I've seen a hose come off even held down by a worm drive hose clamp (jubilee clip).  Hard plumbing lasts forever and is safer.
                      I say sell the glass piece to someone who wants it for lab use, and replace with copper/stainless which solves any issue with toxicity of materials as well as safety from accidental disconnections.
                      The best time to do it right is the first time.


                    • Zapata Vive
                      Responses inline, apologies for the formatting; ... Definity not safe for beverages ... with copper tubing ? ... suffer from this. You want some copper, all
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 4, 2014
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                        Responses inline, apologies for the formatting;

                        > the glass worm originally had clear pvc hose as its input and output.
                        >  
                        > this might be fine for lab experiments but will it effect my eau de vie ?

                        Definity not safe for beverages

                        > do all stills need to use copper ? would i be better replacing the pvc with copper tubing ?
                        >  
                        > i've read the copper helps remove sulphur - however my cider does not suffer from this.

                        You want some copper, all calvados stills are copper for a reason. The sulfur may not be a problem in your cider but you definitely don't want it in your distillate. Perhaps some copper mesh in the lyne arm would suffice? Or making a copper condenser to replace the glass.

                        > the other is vertical and it reaches down inside the pot to about 3 inches from the bottom. What would this have been used for ?

                        If this is repurposed lab gear, lots of uses.  An air inlet, a way to add reactants, take samples etc. I see no obvious use for it for distilling other than maybe a fill port?

                        > I am considering cutting this off and putting a thermometer into the top of the still instead.

                        Thermometers aren't really very useful on pot stills, especially if they aren't at the very top right before the vapor is condensed.  That said sometimes it is useful to decide when to stop a stripping run if you aren't using a parrot to measure emerging %. That said, get or make a parrot, I can't imagine running a pot without one.

                        > Lastly I am looking at buying a gas boiling ring. What sort of output (kw) would be best for the distillation of 60 litres of cider ( I understand that a gentle but slower heat source gives better results)

                        Heat input is not determined by the volume of feed.  Heat input needs to match your condensers abilities, and the physical parameters of your still for issues such as foaming (which leads to puking)

                        For example 1 kW will provide the exact same amount of distillate at the exact same rate from 6 liters as it does from 60 liters. The only difference is the 60 l will take longer to boil.

                      • Zapata Vive
                        Hey Tom Bom, jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo! He likes the sweet tart appleos The sweet calvados oh calvadill, calvadilladillos! Realized I gave short advice on the
                        Message 11 of 13 , Oct 5, 2014
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                          Hey Tom Bom, jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo!
                          He likes the sweet tart appleos
                          The sweet calvados oh calvadill, calvadilladillos!

                          Realized I gave short advice on the power level. It is important to understand that it is your condensers heat exchange capability or " knock down power" that dictates maximum distilling power, not pot size. Personally i wont even heatup with more power than a condenser can handle, its just an unnecessary risk to me. But I can give better advice than just that.

                          For distilling, as little as 1 kW would be reasonable for 60 l, though rather slow, and tediously slow at heatup.  If the condenser can handle it, and the the other parameters can handle it (wash doesnt scorch, riser, lyne and condenser are wide enough, no choking or puking etc) as high as 5.5 kW for stripping runs is reasonable. That would be super fast for a spirit run, so I'd say about 2 kW would be good for that.

                          Basically anywhere from 1-5 kW.

                          I like the speeds of running ~ 5 kW for heat up and stripping, and 2-3kw for spirit runs, assuming that works with the still, wash, and operator.

                        • sheltonus
                          Mr. Vive, Please speak to calculating condenser knock down power
                          Message 12 of 13 , Oct 5, 2014
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                            Mr. Vive, 

                            Please speak to calculating condenser "knock down power" 


                             
                          • Zapata Vive
                            Well the calculator on homedistiller.org is fairly adequate and is probably as close as most people get to actually calculating anything. It is quite handy
                            Message 13 of 13 , Oct 5, 2014
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                              Well the calculator on homedistiller.org is fairly adequate and is probably as close as most people get to actually calculating anything.  It is quite handy for ball parking.

                              Honestly most people probably just emulate a documented setup or guess and then overbuild a little.  Good ol' boys would build and test. The condenser either knocks down all the vapor, or it doesn't.

                              If you really want to calculate by hand how much power a condenser can knock down, I'd recommend The Heat Exchange Handbook, its in Harry's library at tastylime.net.  Honestly though most of the math in there is over my head, but the principles are approachable. 

                              A shortcut is to use an emulator program.  I found a very detailed software program with a trial period and played with it extensively while designing a shotgun as a shortcut to actually doing the math described in the Handbook.  I don't remember the program name but can check next time I have that computer booted up if you like.  For example an interesting comparison the software allowed was that a shotgun condenser with properly designed coolant side baffles calculated out to having something like 40% more capacity than one with no baffles. (I've yet to actually quantify that in the real world though).

                              To measure "knockdown power" in the real world, just crank up the heat until steam spits out, then back off until it doesn't. That is all the power you can knock down, at that flow rate of coolant.  Note though that most of us will want to run a good bit less than that to cool the distillate to something more convenient and within a safety margin.

                              On Oct 5, 2014 5:03 PM, "sheltonus@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                               

                              Mr. Vive, 


                              Please speak to calculating condenser "knock down power" 


                               
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