Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Gelatinization Temperatures

Expand Messages
  • last2blast
    I found a complicated issue that needs to be addressed by people who make spirits. I was checking out the White Labs web site and they posted Grain Starch
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 11, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      I found a complicated issue that needs to be addressed by people who make spirits.  I was checking out the White Labs web site and they posted Grain Starch Gelatinization Temperature chart as follows:

      Barley - 57 / 59 C    -----   126 / 138 F
      Wheat - 58 / 64 C    -----   136 / 147 F
      Rye    - 57 / 70 C    -----   135 / 158 F
      Corn  - 62 / 72 C     -----   144 / 162 F
      RICE - 68 / 77 C    -----   154 / 171 F
      SORGHUM - 68 / 77 --   154 / 171 F

      Example: I plan to make bourbon, so corn, wheat, and rye and heated up to the required 160 F for corn and rye.


      What happens to the wheat that Gelatinized after 147 F?

      I add my barley malt but the wash is still close to 160.  Is my barley malt denatured?

      Would it be better to cook the wheat separately from the corn and rye, and then combine the washes before adding the barley malt?

      Does Barley Gelatinization effect barley enzymes or visa a versa?

      Robert

      P.S. After 6 months of looking, I finally found a place for my malt house and work shop.  Soon the fun will start.
    • last2blast
      I found another chart with more Grain Starch Gelatinization Temperatures: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/grain-gelatinization-chart-188872/
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 12, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        I found another chart with more Grain Starch Gelatinization Temperatures:


        It also show enzyme rest temperature and when enzymes become denatured.  It also shows that corn, sorghum, millet, and rice benefit from boiling to produce more alcohol.

        Robert
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.