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Blue Vodka?

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  • maddiesmom69
    I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 1.5” X 15 long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 14, 2014
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      I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

      1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
      The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

      The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

      My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

      Thank you!
      Michelle :)
    • cdennyb@hotmail.com
      The blue is caused by the copper. It goes away the more you run it. Usually only the first little bit is colored and the hearts are fine. Do a couple of runs
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 14, 2014
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        Click Me!
        The blue is caused by the copper. It goes away the more you run it.
        Usually only the first little bit is colored and the hearts are fine. Do a couple of runs and it'll be gone.
         
         
         
         
        -------Original Message-------
         
        Date: 01/14/14 21:17:38
        Subject: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?
         
         

        I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

        1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
        The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

        The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

        My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

        Thank you!
        Michelle :)

         
      • Robert Hubble
        Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer s reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 14, 2014
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          Michelle,

          That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          From: maddiesmom69@...
          Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2014 20:24:41 -0800
          Subject: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

           
          I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

          1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
          The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

          The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

          My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

          Thank you!
          Michelle :)

        • cdennyb
          I suspect he used sugar and a turbo yeast. I hardly think the nutrients were to blame. If you look at the fact it s a clean copper condenser tube made of
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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            I suspect he used sugar and a turbo yeast. I hardly think the nutrients were to blame. If you look at the fact it's a clean copper condenser tube made of copper all shiny and bright right before the run and it happens to me in occasion right after a thorough cleaning with citric acid. The chopper mesh I use is real clean but my first run is always bluish tinted so I just strip the first one and take my time on the remaining ones. look at the fact it's a clean copper condenser tube made of copper all shiny and bright right before the run and it happens to me in occasion right after a thorough cleaning with citric acid. My copper mesh is always bright and clean but leaves a copper color of bluish tint on the first run through. Just my experience.


            Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


            -------- Original message --------
            From: Robert Hubble
            Date:01/14/2014 11:29 PM (GMT-08:00)
            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

             

            Michelle,

            That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            From: maddiesmom69@...
            Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2014 20:24:41 -0800
            Subject: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

             
            I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

            1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
            The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

            The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

            My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

            Thank you!
            Michelle :)

          • Robert Hubble
            If it s just a blue tinge that appears once and then is gone, you re probably right. If it persists, it s Schweizer s reagent formed when ammonia gas is
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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              If it's just a blue tinge that appears once and then is gone, you're probably right. If it persists, it's Schweizer's reagent formed when ammonia gas is liberated by a combination of high pH and the boatload of ammonium compound nutrients in turbo "yeast" (really a mixture of yeast and high-activity nutrients), to react with the copper in your still.

              Often, the conditions arise from adding sodium bicarbonate to a turbo wash.

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


              From: cdennyb@...
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 01:53:05 -0800
              Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

               

              I suspect he used sugar and a turbo yeast. I hardly think the nutrients were to blame. If you look at the fact it's a clean copper condenser tube made of copper all shiny and bright right before the run and it happens to me in occasion right after a thorough cleaning with citric acid. The chopper mesh I use is real clean but my first run is always bluish tinted so I just strip the first one and take my time on the remaining ones. look at the fact it's a clean copper condenser tube made of copper all shiny and bright right before the run and it happens to me in occasion right after a thorough cleaning with citric acid. My copper mesh is always bright and clean but leaves a copper color of bluish tint on the first run through. Just my experience.


              Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


              -------- Original message --------
              From: Robert Hubble
              Date:01/14/2014 11:29 PM (GMT-08:00)
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

               

              Michelle,

              That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem.

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              From: maddiesmom69@...
              Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2014 20:24:41 -0800
              Subject: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

               
              I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

              1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
              The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

              The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

              My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

              Thank you!
              Michelle :)



            • Michelle Houser
              Thank you!  I am going to try and use carbon and see if that will help clean it up too.  On Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:24 AM, cdennyb@hotmail.com
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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                Thank you!  I am going to try and use carbon and see if that will help clean it up too. 



                On Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:24 AM, "cdennyb@..." <cdennyb@...> wrote:
                 
                Click Me!
                The blue is caused by the copper. It goes away the more you run it.
                Usually only the first little bit is colored and the hearts are fine. Do a couple of runs and it'll be gone.
                 
                 
                 
                 
                -------Original Message-------
                 
                Date: 01/14/14 21:17:38
                Subject: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?
                 
                 
                I made my first batch of sugar wash vodka in the following: 

                1.5”  X 15" long copper pipe and Cooling is achieved with a copper condenser tube, so no WORM is required.
                The still is made with a  Professional Commercial Grade 8 gallon, 32QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Boiler

                The Large dome vapor chamber top increases surface area to increase fractional distilling

                My question is this:  The vodka appears to have a light blue tinge to it.  I have not cut it yet or polished it.  Is this normal or a concern and if it is a concern what could be causing it and what should I do? 

                Thank you!
                Michelle :)
                 


              • Paul
                Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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                  Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                   
                  Thanks for your help
                  Paul

                     
                   
                  Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                • maddiesmom69
                  Another person pointed me to this article and now I don t know if I should just run my batch again with a bit of lemon juice or throw it out? Blue Distillate -
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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                    Another person pointed me to this article and now I don't know if I should just run my batch again with a bit of lemon juice or throw it out?


                    Blue Distillate - and how to correct it.
                     
                    The problem:
                    If ever you distill your mash and find that you get a blue-ish colour (and perhaps even a copper/metallic taste) don't drink it!
                    It is not fit for human consumption.
                     
                    When distilling "faulty" mashes the distillate will start off with a bluish colour and slowly the blue-ishness will turn less blue as you continue to distill.
                     
                    These faulty mashes is the result of chemical reaction between the copper of your still and ammonia.
                     
                    To explain:
                    Nitrogen is used in many nutrients to allow the yeast to grow and ferment healthly.
                     
                    However, too much unconsumed nutrients can also create a problem during distilling. 
                     
                    The nitrogen (from the nutrients) reacts in an alkaline environment to form ammonia. The more residual nitrogen and the more alkaline the mash, the more ammonia results.
                     
                    This ammonia then corrodes the copper and results in a "blue-ish distillate which tastes not good at all.
                     
                    "Blue-ish" distillate should be discarded and is not fit for human consumption.
                     
                    To prevent this: 
                    Use less nitrogen containing nutrients and ensure the pash pH is acidic rather than alkaline  - easy as that!

                    If you do expect the mash to contain residual nitrogen just before distillation, make sure to keep the pH low (acidic) before distillation. An alkaline mash makes the nitrogen/ammonia/copper problem even worse. Ideally your mash's pH shuld be between 4 and 5.5 (use pH test strips to confirm this).

                    After a blue run, just flush all copper with clean water and it will be fine again
                  • Paul
                    I found the email that Z Bob sent that contained these words of wisdom when I had the blues. - I m betting that blue floc is a copper compound, maybe just a
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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                      I found the email that Z Bob sent that contained these words of wisdom when I had the blues. -

                      "I'm betting that blue floc is a copper compound, maybe just a trace of Schweizer's reagent, which can occur when your pH is too high and you have some ammonium compounds in your wash. When it happens, it's always in the first distillation. If you would have put bicarb in that wash, it would have raised the pH and probably made that blue a lot more abundant, so never put bicarb in your wash to be stripped.

                      Bicarb is only to be used when you are re-distilling low wines, and then only if you want to remove all flavor from your liquor, so only use it on a vodka spirit run, and never on a nice whiskey where you've taken pains to get a good flavor.

                      Only use citric acid to lower a pH that you know is too high; guessing at pH and then taking action can cause may problems, often like your blue floc. Oh, just re-distill that."

                      Paul




                       
                      Another person pointed me to this article and now I don't know if I should just run my batch again with a bit of lemon juice or throw it out?


                      Blue Distillate - and how to correct it.
                       
                      The problem:


                    • RLB
                       4 and 5.5   is real questionable because ZBob has shown us charts that say it s 4.8 to 5.2. Robert ________________________________ From:
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 15, 2014
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                        " 4 and 5.5"  is real questionable because ZBob has shown us charts that say it's 4.8 to 5.2.

                        Robert


                        From: "maddiesmom69@..." <maddiesmom69@...>
                        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 2:32 PM
                        Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                         
                        Another person pointed me to this article and now I don't know if I should just run my batch again with a bit of lemon juice or throw it out?


                        Blue Distillate - and how to correct it.
                         
                        The problem:
                        If ever you distill your mash and find that you get a blue-ish colour (and perhaps even a copper/metallic taste) don't drink it!
                        It is not fit for human consumption.
                         
                        When distilling "faulty" mashes the distillate will start off with a bluish colour and slowly the blue-ishness will turn less blue as you continue to distill.
                         
                        These faulty mashes is the result of chemical reaction between the copper of your still and ammonia.
                         
                        To explain:
                        Nitrogen is used in many nutrients to allow the yeast to grow and ferment healthly.
                         
                        However, too much unconsumed nutrients can also create a problem during distilling. 
                         
                        The nitrogen (from the nutrients) reacts in an alkaline environment to form ammonia. The more residual nitrogen and the more alkaline the mash, the more ammonia results.
                         
                        This ammonia then corrodes the copper and results in a "blue-ish distillate which tastes not good at all.
                         
                        "Blue-ish" distillate should be discarded and is not fit for human consumption.
                         
                        To prevent this: 
                        Use less nitrogen containing nutrients and ensure the pash pH is acidic rather than alkaline  - easy as that!
                        If you do expect the mash to contain residual nitrogen just before distillation, make sure to keep the pH low (acidic) before distillation. An alkaline mash makes the nitrogen/ammonia/copper problem even worse. Ideally your mash's pH shuld be between 4 and 5.5 (use pH test strips to confirm this).
                        After a blue run, just flush all copper with clean water and it will be fine again


                      • Robert Hubble
                        Sorry to be confusing, Paul. If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn t me, for two reasons. Since it s a combination of high pH and ammonium
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                          Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                          If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          From: sudokuhater-b@...
                          Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                           

                          Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                           
                          Thanks for your help
                          Paul

                             
                           
                          Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                        • marcornantel
                          Y Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Robert Hubble Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                            Y
                            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                            From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                            Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014 11:40:00 -0800
                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com<new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                            ReplyTo: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                             

                            Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                            If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            From: sudokuhater-b@...
                            Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                             

                            Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                             
                            Thanks for your help
                            Paul

                               
                             
                            Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                          • marcornantel
                            Ty Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Robert Hubble Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                              Ty
                              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                              From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                              Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014 11:40:00 -0800
                              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com<new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                              ReplyTo: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                               

                              Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                              If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              From: sudokuhater-b@...
                              Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                               

                              Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                               
                              Thanks for your help
                              Paul

                                 
                               
                              Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                            • marcornantel
                              Yet Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Robert Hubble Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                                Yet
                                Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                                From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                                Sender: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014 11:40:00 -0800
                                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com<new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                ReplyTo: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                 

                                Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                                If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                From: sudokuhater-b@...
                                Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                 

                                Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                                 
                                Thanks for your help
                                Paul

                                   
                                 
                                Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                              • Paul
                                Thank you Bob. So re-distill without bicarb, but for better removal of ester flavors throw a tablespoon or two of bicard in. Paul
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                                  Thank you Bob. So re-distill without bicarb, but for better removal of ester flavors throw a tablespoon or two of bicard in.

                                  Paul


                                  From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                                  To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Sunday, 19 January 2014 8:40 AM
                                  Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                   
                                  Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                                  If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                                  Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                  To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: sudokuhater-b@...
                                  Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                                  Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                   

                                  Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                                   
                                  Thanks for your help
                                  Paul

                                     
                                   
                                  Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller



                                • Robert Hubble
                                  Reply inline in blue Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com From: sudokuhater-b@yahooxtra.co.nz Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014 14:40:55
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jan 18, 2014
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                                    Reply inline in blue

                                    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                    To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: sudokuhater-b@...
                                    Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2014 14:40:55 -0800
                                    Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                     

                                    Thank you Bob. So re-distill without bicarb, but for better removal of ester flavors IN A SECOND (OR MORE) DISTILLATION) throw a tablespoon or two of bicard in.

                                    Paul


                                    From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                                    To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Sunday, 19 January 2014 8:40 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                     
                                    Sorry to be confusing, Paul.

                                    If someone recommended redistilling with bicarb, it wasn't me, for two reasons. Since it's a combination of high pH and ammonium compounds that causes Schweizer's reagent, and since all those non-volatile ammonium compounds in the original wash never came through in your distillate, simply re-distilling would work fine. Bicarb is only useful for tripping ester flavors from low wines (already distilled).

                                    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                    To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: sudokuhater-b@...
                                    Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 10:55:09 -0800
                                    Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Blue Vodka?

                                     

                                    Bob, do you mean adding the acid in before doing another distilling run? How does this tie in with your advice to redistill with sodium bicarb to remove the schweitzer's reagent?
                                     
                                    Thanks for your help
                                    Paul

                                       
                                     
                                    Michelle, That blue is a copper compound, most probably Schweizer's reagent, and ammonium-copper complex. Usually this is a result of a wash with lots of (ammonium) nutrients, and a relatively high wash pH. Adding a little acid, citric or acetic, to get the pH below 6, should solve your problem. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




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