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Home made natural yeast.

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  • wzuccarello
    Great article on acquiring and using. natural yeasts. Be sure to read the comments for even more info. I want to try the raisin yeast in place of the DADY in
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 4, 2014
      Great article on acquiring and using. natural yeasts. Be sure to read the comments for even more info.

      I want to try the raisin yeast in place of  the DADY in my sugarhead, just to see what happens.

      http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/
    • RLB
      Thanks for the info.  I will never have to again buy yeast after some experimentation. Robert  ________________________________ From: wzuccarello@yahoo.com
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 4, 2014
        Thanks for the info.  I will never have to again buy yeast after some experimentation.

        Robert 


        From: "wzuccarello@..." <wzuccarello@...>
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, January 4, 2014 1:24 PM
        Subject: [new_distillers] Home made natural yeast.

         
        Great article on acquiring and using. natural yeasts. Be sure to read the comments for even more info.

        I want to try the raisin yeast in place of  the DADY in my sugarhead, just to see what happens.

        http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/
      • Ric Cunningham
        I like to harvest my cider yeast each year and use it for various fermentations. Generally tolerant to high alcohol even if it is a bit slow sometimes. ... --
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 6, 2014
          I like to harvest my cider yeast each year and use it for various fermentations. Generally tolerant to high alcohol even if it is a bit slow sometimes.


          On Sat, Jan 4, 2014 at 1:24 PM, <wzuccarello@...> wrote:
           

          Great article on acquiring and using. natural yeasts. Be sure to read the comments for even more info.

          I want to try the raisin yeast in place of  the DADY in my sugarhead, just to see what happens.

          http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/




          --
          US Navy - 100% on watch
        • Zapata Vive
          It seems like the article is written by someone without much knowledge on yeast. Not saying the methods don t work. But All of the potato methods for example
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 6, 2014
            It seems like the article is written by someone without much knowledge on yeast.  Not saying the methods don't work.  But All of the potato methods for example aren't getting any yeast from the potatoes, despite what the article says about potatoes being covered in yeasts.  By boiling the potatoes, the only source for the yeast would be whatever might be on the flour, or just as likely whatever is floating around in the kitchen air.

            Again, not saying they won't work, just not how the article implies.  Yeast is everywhere, especially in kitchens used for baking...
          • Douglas French
            How do you harvest the yeast? And how do you store it until you are ready to use it?   Douglas French Caballeros, Inc./ Scorpion Mezcal sa de cv Oaxaca,
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 6, 2014
              How do you harvest the yeast? And how do you store it until you are ready to use it?

               
              Douglas French
              Caballeros, Inc./ Scorpion Mezcal sa de cv
              Oaxaca, Mexico
              Tel: 52-951-516-0654
              Destileria: 951-511-5701
              Cel: 951 508 1030
              www.scorpionmezcal.com
              www.oaxacanstuff.com
              Enviar factura o comprobante de pago a: scorpionfactura@...


              From: Ric Cunningham <wilypig@...>
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, January 6, 2014 5:33 AM
              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Home made natural yeast.

               
              I like to harvest my cider yeast each year and use it for various fermentations. Generally tolerant to high alcohol even if it is a bit slow sometimes.


              On Sat, Jan 4, 2014 at 1:24 PM, <wzuccarello@...> wrote:
               
              Great article on acquiring and using. natural yeasts. Be sure to read the comments for even more info.

              I want to try the raisin yeast in place of  the DADY in my sugarhead, just to see what happens.

              http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/



              --
              US Navy - 100% on watch


            • wzuccarello
              Read the 43 or so comments below the linked article.Plenty info on harvesting and storing in the replies .
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 6, 2014
                Read the 43 or so comments below the linked article.Plenty info on harvesting and storing in the replies .
              • wzuccarello
                OK, I started some raisin yeast bt throwing some raisins and sugar water in a pint jar and letting it sit . After 5 days, it was bubbly and had a wine smell.
                Message 7 of 15 , Jan 12, 2014
                  OK, I started some raisin yeast bt throwing some raisins and sugar water in a pint jar and letting it sit . After 5 days, it was bubbly and had a wine smell.

                  Last night I made a gallon of wash with 4 cups sugar and juice of 1/2 lemon on the stove. Poured it in a demijohn, cooled it and added 1/2t fermax, then decanted about a cup of the wash out and poured in the raisin juice.and added a airlock. Forgot to measure SG but from previous experience with my normal 4.5gal wash recipie  I think it's real close to 1.080
                   I poured the decanted cup of wash in the jar with the raisins and after a few hours, the raisins were bubbling harder than ever.

                  This morning, the gallon ferment in the jug had really taken off, had the airlock slobbering lots of good smelling foam.

                  I will post the results as this experiment progresses.
                  Wayne
                • RLB
                  You was describing the same way they make vinegar, so the critical part here is to harvest yeast before it turns into vinegar. Robert
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 12, 2014
                    You was describing the same way they make vinegar, so the critical part here is to harvest yeast before it turns into vinegar.

                    Robert



                    From: "wzuccarello@..." <wzuccarello@...>
                    To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2014 2:51 PM
                    Subject: [new_distillers] RE: Home made natural yeast.

                     
                    OK, I started some raisin yeast bt throwing some raisins and sugar water in a pint jar and letting it sit . After 5 days, it was bubbly and had a wine smell.

                    Last night I made a gallon of wash with 4 cups sugar and juice of 1/2 lemon on the stove. Poured it in a demijohn, cooled it and added 1/2t fermax, then decanted about a cup of the wash out and poured in the raisin juice.and added a airlock. Forgot to measure SG but from previous experience with my normal 4.5gal wash recipie  I think it's real close to 1.080
                     I poured the decanted cup of wash in the jar with the raisins and after a few hours, the raisins were bubbling harder than ever.

                    This morning, the gallon ferment in the jug had really taken off, had the airlock slobbering lots of good smelling foam.

                    I will post the results as this experiment progresses.
                    Wayne


                  • wzuccarello
                    Oops Forgot that I also added 1/2 cup of cornmeal and a heaping tablespoon of Maltomeal to the wash while heating it. Been doing this with my sugar wash last
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jan 12, 2014
                      Oops Forgot that I also added 1/2 cup of cornmeal and a heaping tablespoon of Maltomeal to the wash while heating it. Been doing this with my sugar wash last few batches.
                       Makes a very smooth tasty storebought like liqor with no solvent like taste, when run slowly thru an unpacked short column still, then dilluted to 50% and aged on JD chips a few days.
                      This recipie makes a run with very short heads and tails and a very wide hearts cut.
                    • Jan
                      Hi, What still did you use, a pot still to get the taste across? Cheers, Jan.
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jan 12, 2014
                        Hi,
                        What still did you use, a pot still to get the taste across?
                        Cheers,
                        Jan.



                        On 13/01/2014 6:16 AM, wzuccarello@... wrote:
                         

                        Oops Forgot that I also added 1/2 cup of cornmeal and a heaping tablespoon of Maltomeal to the wash while heating it. Been doing this with my sugar wash last few batches.
                         Makes a very smooth tasty storebought like liqor with no solvent like taste, when run slowly thru an unpacked short column still, then dilluted to 50% and aged on JD chips a few days.
                        This recipie makes a run with very short heads and tails and a very wide hearts cut.


                      • Yahoo! Mail
                        I used a 1 1/2 x 16 column still with a Liebig condenser. I use an 1100 watt hotplate with a router speed controller from HF set at around 40%  to maintain
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jan 12, 2014
                          I used a 1 1/2" x 16" column still with a Liebig condenser. I use an 1100 watt hotplate with a router speed controller from HF set at around 40%  to maintain around 180 deg . I took out 4 oz for the fores and another 4oz for heads then made mostly 8 oz seperate draws until close to the end where I dropped back to 4 oz cuts.

                          After many hours the temp will eventually climb to 200. I quit hour or so later when it creeped up to 201 and still couldn't taste or smell anything like tails coming out of the condenser.
                           This last batch yesterday yeilded a full 48 ounces of sweet flavorful 70%  and 4 oz foreshots and 4 oz heads put aside.



                          On Sunday, January 12, 2014 6:51 PM, Jan <jkooms@...> wrote:


                          Hi,
                          What still did you use, a pot still to get the taste across?
                          Cheers,
                          Jan.



                          On 13/01/2014 6:16 AM, wzuccarello@... wrote:
                           
                          Oops Forgot that I also added 1/2 cup of cornmeal and a heaping tablespoon of Maltomeal to the wash while heating it. Been doing this with my sugar wash last few batches.
                           Makes a very smooth tasty storebought like liqor with no solvent like taste, when run slowly thru an unpacked short column still, then dilluted to 50% and aged on JD chips a few days.
                          This recipie makes a run with very short heads and tails and a very wide hearts cut.





                        • Robert Hubble
                          At the risk of having eyes rolled at me, you need to understand that you didn t maintain a boiling temperature of 180F; there is only one boiling point for a
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jan 14, 2014
                            At the risk of having eyes rolled at me, you need to understand that you didn't "maintain" a boiling temperature of 180F; there is only one boiling point for a given mixture of ethanol and water, and when you distill, that's the temperature of the vapor coming off your wash. Depending on heat losses in your riser, your head temperature may show as a tiny bit lower. If you started boiling at 180F, ~85C, your wash was about 34% to start.

                            In a potstill, because the ethanol comes over faster than the water (at first, anyway), the ethanol concentration of your wash will drop as your still run progresses, and your boiling point will also change accordingly, rising gradually throughout the still run, according to this graph. When the last drop boils, it will be almost pure water, and will boil at 212F, 100C.

                             
                             

                            Since you turned off the still at 201F, just about 94C, assuming negligible riser heat loss, you turned off the still while the wash was still about 8% and the emerging distillate was 50%, all from the graph. No wonder you didn't taste tails, but you threw out a lot of ethanol.

                            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            From: wzuccarello@...
                            Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 19:14:35 -0800
                            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] RE: Home made natural yeast.

                             

                            I used a 1 1/2" x 16" column still with a Liebig condenser. I use an 1100 watt hotplate with a router speed controller from HF set at around 40%  to maintain around 180 deg . I took out 4 oz for the fores and another 4oz for heads then made mostly 8 oz seperate draws until close to the end where I dropped back to 4 oz cuts.

                            After many hours the temp will eventually climb to 200. I quit hour or so later when it creeped up to 201 and still couldn't taste or smell anything like tails coming out of the condenser.
                             This last batch yesterday yeilded a full 48 ounces of sweet flavorful 70%  and 4 oz foreshots and 4 oz heads put aside.



                            ----snip----


                          • RLB
                            I totally agree with everything Bob said, but I was wondering if anyone has ever distilled at 180 F throughout the whole run.  Every time the temperature
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jan 14, 2014
                            I totally agree with everything Bob said, but I was wondering if anyone has ever distilled at 180 F throughout the whole run.  Every time the temperature increased the heat is reduced to maintain that 180 F?  I would try it myself, but too many people are watching me.

                            Robert


                            From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                            To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 6:31 PM
                            Subject: RE: [new_distillers] RE: Home made natural yeast.

                             
                            At the risk of having eyes rolled at me, you need to understand that you didn't "maintain" a boiling temperature of 180F; there is only one boiling point for a given mixture of ethanol and water, and when you distill, that's the temperature of the vapor coming off your wash. Depending on heat losses in your riser, your head temperature may show as a tiny bit lower. If you started boiling at 180F, ~85C, your wash was about 34% to start.

                            In a potstill, because the ethanol comes over faster than the water (at first, anyway), the ethanol concentration of your wash will drop as your still run progresses, and your boiling point will also change accordingly, rising gradually throughout the still run, according to this graph. When the last drop boils, it will be almost pure water, and will boil at 212F, 100C.

                             
                             

                            Since you turned off the still at 201F, just about 94C, assuming negligible riser heat loss, you turned off the still while the wash was still about 8% and the emerging distillate was 50%, all from the graph. No wonder you didn't taste tails, but you threw out a lot of ethanol.

                            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                          • wzuccarello
                            Thanks for chiming in, I m a newbie and I need all the rapport I can get. Yes, I know 180 wasn t the boiling temp, it s just a thermometer reading that makes
                            Message 14 of 15 , Jan 14, 2014

                              Thanks for chiming in, I'm a newbie and I need all the rapport I can get.
                              Yes, I know 180 wasn't the boiling temp, it's just a thermometer reading that makes the run faster than holding a lower reading, from my experience.. Once the still was stable and producing at 180, about 4 drops per second, it still took 14 hours to get to 201 and it was 2:00 am, I was tired and sleepy so I sacrificed what was left in the boiler, which was prolly pretty close to the tails, according to the volume I had already collected.
                              I have the boiler and column insulated. so there wasn't much heat loss there.
                            • Robert Hubble
                              Well, after the run has progressed to where the boiling point of the wash is 181F, if you hold the wash temperature to 180F, it just won t boil. Oh, it ll
                              Message 15 of 15 , Jan 14, 2014
                                Well, after the run has progressed to where the boiling point of the wash is 181F, if you hold the wash temperature to 180F, it just won't boil. Oh, it'll still evaporate some but a still run might take weeks, and by Roualt's law, the ethanol content of the vapor will be the same as if it did boil. As the ethanol rich vapor is removed, the boiling point will go up still more, and the process will go still slower at 180F.

                                In truth, though, running at temperatures below a boil has one major advantage. You'll have that time to read War and Peace that you've always wanted.

                                Think of how fast water evaporates at 211F, compared to 212F.

                                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                From: last2blast@...
                                Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2014 16:04:04 -0800
                                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] RE: Home made natural yeast. [1 Attachment]

                                I totally agree with everything Bob said, but I was wondering if anyone has ever distilled at 180 F throughout the whole run.  Every time the temperature increased the heat is reduced to maintain that 180 F?  I would try it myself, but too many people are watching me.

                                Robert


                                From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
                                To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 6:31 PM
                                Subject: RE: [new_distillers] RE: Home made natural yeast.

                                 
                                At the risk of having eyes rolled at me, you need to understand that you didn't "maintain" a boiling temperature of 180F; there is only one boiling point for a given mixture of ethanol and water, and when you distill, that's the temperature of the vapor coming off your wash. Depending on heat losses in your riser, your head temperature may show as a tiny bit lower. If you started boiling at 180F, ~85C, your wash was about 34% to start.

                                In a potstill, because the ethanol comes over faster than the water (at first, anyway), the ethanol concentration of your wash will drop as your still run progresses, and your boiling point will also change accordingly, rising gradually throughout the still run, according to this graph. When the last drop boils, it will be almost pure water, and will boil at 212F, 100C.

                                 
                                 

                                Since you turned off the still at 201F, just about 94C, assuming negligible riser heat loss, you turned off the still while the wash was still about 8% and the emerging distillate was 50%, all from the graph. No wonder you didn't taste tails, but you threw out a lot of ethanol.

                                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


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